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Full text of "Meredith College Bulletin"

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CARLYLE CAMPBELL LIBRARY 



A M54jq 

376.8 Ser. 55-58 



ACCESSION 



57864 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/meredithcollegeb1962mere 




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MEREDITH 
COLLEGE 



RALEIGH, N. C. 




Summer Session 

JUNE ll-JULY 21 




GENERAL INF0R3UTI0N 

Dormitory students slioiild arrive in time to 
register on Monday, June 11. Registration will 
be held irt the College library, beginning at, 
2:00 p.m. Vann Dormitory will be used, but 
will not be open until 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, 
June 10. 

Upon arrival, students will register in the 
odice of the Dean of Students in Johnson Hall 
before keys are issued by the House Director. 

High school graduates and transfer students 
who have been approved for admission to 
Meredith may complete certain required 
courses during the summer session. Students 
enrolled at other colleges should send in ad- 
vance a statement from a college ofHcial au- 
thorizing particular courses for credit a. Mere- 
dith. 

During the six-week session a student mty 
earn a maximum of six semester hours of 
credit. 

Classes will meet from 7:45 a.m. to 1:00 
p.m., Monday through Saturday, except July 
4. 

The residence halls provide comfortable liv- 
ing quarters. Meals will be served in the Col- 
lege dining hall. Students will furnish their 
own towels and bed linen (for single beds). 

Recreational and social programs and 
weekly round table discussions o£ current 
afliairs are traditional. Buses leave frequently 
from the administration building to tlie busi- 
ness district. The outdoor swimming pool will 
be available. 




CALENDAR 

JiiiiL' 10-11 Siiiulay and Monday — Dor- 
iiiilory stiulentg arrive before 
2:00 p.m. Monday 

June 11 Monday — Regislration in li- 
brary, 2:00 p.m. 

June 12 Tuesday — Classes begin 

Jidy 4 Wednesday — Holiday 

July 20 Friday — Examinations 

July 2 1 Saturday — Summer session 
ComniencenienI 



RECOGNITION 

Meredith College, a standard four-year 
college for women, is a member of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, and the Association 
of American Colleges. Graduates of 
IMeredilh are eligible for membership in 
the American Association of UniverBily 
Women. Meredith is a Liberal Arts mem- 
ber of the National Association of Schools 
of Music. 




FACULTY AND STAFF 

Carlyle Campbell, A.M., LL.D President- 

Leisliman A. Peacock, Ph.D Dean 

V. Howard Belcher, B.S Business Manager 

Vera Tart Marsh Registrar 

Ma Belle Smith Dean of Students 

Hazel Baity, A.B, in L.S Librarian 

Jane Gieeii, A.M Librarian 

Lila Bell, M.Ed Education 

Edwin K. Blaiichard, M.Mus. Lit Music 

Ernest F. Canaday, Pli.D Mathematics 

Harry E. Cooper, Mns.D., F.A.G.O Music 

Roger H. Ciook, Th.D Religion 

Aitlnir C. Downs, Jr., Ed.D Art 

James H. Eads, Jr., M.S Biology 

Saiah Lemnion, Ph.D History 

Qiientin 0. McAllister, Ph.D Spanish 

Anna B. Peck, AM.,.Geography, Government 

Stuart Pratt, Mus.M .' Music 

Norma Rose, Ph.D English 



EXPENSES 

General Fees: 

Tuition (for two courses, giving six 

semester hours of credit) S90.00 

Student activities fee 2.00 

Residence: room and board 90.00 

Special Fees: 

Late registration (after June 11}.... 2.00 
Tuition for special students, for each 

three-hour course 45.00 

Piano, Organ, Voice (Two half-hour 

lessons a week) 45.00 

One half-hour lesson a week.... 25.00 

Voice Class 30.00 

Use of piano, one hour daily 3.00 

For each additional hour 1.75 

Use of organ, tliirty-five or forty-five 

cents an hour. 

Fees are payable upon registration. NO 
REFUNDS WILL BE ALLOWED FOR 
WITHDRAWALS. 



U M M E R 



ION 



/««s // - gidif. 2i, i962 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Tlie number in parentlieses following tlie title of the course indicates tlie 
semester hours of credit allowed. The ColJege does not guarantee to offer 
any course listed below for which there is not a minimum registration of 
six students. The class schedule printed below is not necessarily final. If 



conflicts are apparent, please indicate preferences on the attached appli- 
cation form. Unless othenvise indicated, classes meet six days a week 
for one hour and fifteen minutes each. 



ART 



9:05-11:40 



S26. Ceramics (3). 

An inlroduclory course in ceramic processes and 
material. Projects in coil, slab, and wheel methods 
of construction. Experimentation with various types 
of decoration. Not open to freshmen except by 
special permission. 

Joyner 205 Dr. Downs 

S3I. An Appreciation (3). ^='^5 

A course designed to satisfy the need of general 

students for a key to the understanding of art. Not 

open to art inajors- 

Joyner 201 Dr. Downs 

BIOLOGY 

SL S2. General Biology (3 or 6). 
Lcclure SI— 7:45 Lecture S2— 9:05 

Lali. SI Lab. S2 

10:25-1:00 10:25-1:00 

Mnn. and Wed. Tues. and Tliur. 



A course presenting ihe most important biological 
fads and principles, and so relating them that the 
student can apply them lo the ordinary affairs of life. 
A study of protoplasm, the cell, the lole of gieen 
plants, including simple experiments in plant physi- 
ology, ihe adjustment of organisms to their environ- 
ment, and ihe structure and functions of vertebrates 
with special reference to man, constitutes the work 
of the first part. In S2 a study of typical animal and 
plant forms is made as an introduction to these two 
kingdoms. Students may register for either half of 
the course, or for six hours. 



Hunter Hall 



Mr. Eads 



EDUCATION 

S31. Educational Psychology (3). 9:05 

A course intended to he basic to the others in the 
various sequences which give direction to the pro- 
fessionally trained teaclier. 

Joyner 101 

S52. The Secondary School (3). 11:45 

Organization and administration of the high 
school curriculum; methods of planning and teach- 
ing: ijualilications of the high school teacher. 



S53. Child and Adolescent I'sycholosy (3) 10:25 

A survey of ihe psychological development of the 
individual through childhood and adolescence, 
joyner 101 Miss Bell 

S91. Social Problems in Education 7:45 

A review of current problems confronting educa- 
tion in the LTnited States. 

Joyner 101 Dr. lieveley 

ENGLISH 

S2. Principles of Writing (3). 10:25 

Joyner 107 Dr. Rose 

S21. Development of English Literature (2). 7;45 

Survey of English literature from the beginnings 
through Shakespeare. 

Joyner 107 Or. Rose 



GEOGRAPHY 

S22. Geography of North America (3). 10:25 

Joyner 236 Miss Peck 

GOVERNMENT 

S21. Government of the United Slates {3) . 9:05 
Joyner 236 Miss Peck 



521. History of the United Stales lo 

1865 (3). 9:05 

Joyner 126 Or. Lemrnon 

522. llislary of the United Stales from 

1865 13). 10:25 

Joyner 126 Or. Lemmon 



MATHEMATICS 

SI. College Algebra (3). 7:45 



Dr. Canaday 



S2. Trigonometry {3). 10:25 

Hunter 21S Or. Canaday 



APPLIED MUSIC 

Instruction in organ, piano, and voice will be 
ivailuhle in private lessons. The work will he ad- 



justed lo suit Ihe needs of each student. College 
credit will be granted for this work on the basis of 
one semester hour for nine hours per week of prac- 
tice. 

Organ — Or. Cooper 
Piano — Mr. Pratt 
Voice— Mr. Blanchard 



Voice Class (non credit) 9:05 four days per week 

Fundamentals of correct voice production, breath- 
ing, efficient use of breath, study of elementary vowA 
forms and consonants, elementary songs. Some at- 
tention given to poise, posture, and stage presence. 



Jones 202 



S26. Music Appreciation (3). 



Mr. Blanchard 



I 



A course adapted to the needs of the general col- 
lege student. 

Jones 104 Or. Coopei 



SI. An introduction lo the Old Testament (3). 
9:05 

Joyner 238 Dr. Croc 



S2. An Introduction to the New Testament (3) . 

11:45 

Joyner 238 Dr. Crook 



SPANISH 

S21. Intermediate College Spanish (3). 9:05 

Review of the essentials of the Spanish language; 
composition; intensive oral-aural practice; conver- 
sational drill. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or equivalent. 

Dr. McAllister 



^ 



Joyn 



S22. Intermediate College Spanish (3). 11:45 

Reading and conversation of appropriate difh- 
culty. Oral-aural aids used include records, tape re- 
corder, and short wave radio. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 21, or equivalent, unless 
the student registers for the full year's work. 



Joyner 211 



Dr. McAllister 



Please fill out the attached application blank a 
return before June 1st to 

DEAN L. A. PEACOCK 
Meredith College 
Raleigh, N. C. 




Q 1 = - 5 



A\EUED1TH COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 

Apra, 1962 




Announcements for 1962-1963 



Raleigh 



North Carolina 



Meredith College Library 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

Please address inquiries as indicated below so as to insure prompt 
handling : 

Academic Eecords Registrar 

Admissions Dean of the College 

Alumnae Matters Alumnae Secretary 

Business Matters Business Manager and Treasurer 

Educational Programs Dean of the College 

Employment of Students Business Manager 

Expansion Program Office of Public Relations 

Expenses Business Manager and Treasurer 

General Information Office of President 

News Items News Bureau 

Scholarships and Student Aid Scholarship Committee 

Self-Help Business Manager 

Student Interests Dean of Students 

Student Recruitment Assistant, Public Relations 

Student Reports Registrar 

Summer School Dean of the College 

Transcripts Registrar 

An index at the back of this book will help you to use this catalogue 
to a greater advantage. 

Visitors are always welcome on the Meredith campus. Write the 
Public Relations Office for information and for arranging tours of 
the campus. 



2WEUED1TH COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 

April, 1962 




Announcements for 1962-1963 



Raleigh North Carolina 



Publlahefl qunrterly by Meredith CoUeBe at RnlelRh, N. C. Entered Jnnunry IS, 1908, 
at Raleigh, N. C. aa Bccond-class matter under act of Congress of July 18, 1894. 

Series 65 APRIL,. 1962 No. S 



CONTENTS 

Communications with College Inside Front Cover 

Recognition 4 

Purpose and Policy 4 

College Calendar 6 

Board of Trustees 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Faculty 9 

Faculty and Staff Committees 13 

Officers of the Alumnae Association 14 

General Information 15 

Location 15 

Expenses 21 

Scholarships 23 

Student Loan Funds 24 

Summer Session 25 

Requirements for Admission 26 

Requirements for Degrees 30 

General Academic Regulations 30 

Courses of Instruction 41 

Degrees Conferred 80 

Register of Students 83 

Index 94 



(8) 



Purpose and Policy 



"The purpose of Meredith College is to develop in its students 
the Christian attitude toward the whole of life, and to prepare 
them for intelligent citizenship, home-making, graduate study, and 
for professional and other fields of service. Its intention is to provide 
not only thorough instruction, but also culture made perfect through 
the religion of Jesus Christ. These ideals of academic integrity and 
religious influence have always been cherished at Meredith." 

". . . that Meredith College, a liberal arts college for women, 
should continue to emphasize and develop its academic program 
in terms of scholastic standards and service, giving appropriate 
attention to requirements for the admission and retention of students, 
the formulation and administration of its curriculum, and the main- 
tenance of procedures implicit in an educational institution of high 
quality; 

"and that, aa a Christian college, Meredith should be primarily 
concerned to inculcate attitudes, provide activities, and promote learning 
calculated to deepen and broaden the Christian experience of its 
students and to prepare them for maximum service in the Christian 
enterprise." 

— from Purpose and Policy, as re- 
stated by Board of Trustees, 1954 



Recognition 



Meredith College is a member of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools and the Association of American 
Colleges. Graduates of Meredith are eligible for membership in the 
American Association of University Women. Meredith College is a 
liberal arts member of the National Association of Schools of Music. 



(4) 



1962 







JANUARY 










MAY 










SEPTEMBER 






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1 2 3 


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1 


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9 10 11 


12 


13 


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8 9 10 


11 


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7 


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15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


13 


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14 


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21 


22 


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26 


27 


20 


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22 23 24 


25 


26 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


28 


29 


30 31 






27 


28 


29 30 31 






23 

20 


24 


25 26 27 
OCTOBER 


28 


29 






FEBRUARY 










JUNE 








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19 20 21 


22 


23 


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MARCH 










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13 


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16 


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16 


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12 


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16 


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IS 


19 


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23 


24 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


22 


24 


25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


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25 


26 


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APRIL 










AUGUST 










DECEMBER 






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20 


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17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


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26 


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31 




23 
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31 


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1963 

JANUARY MAY SEPTEMBER 



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10 11 12 


13 


14 


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14 


15 16 17 


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14 15 16 


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IS 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


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29 30 31 






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31 




29 


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FEBRUARY 










JUNE 










OCTOBER 






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F 


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1 


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5 


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11 


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15 


16 


9 


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14 


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14 


15 16 17 


IS 


19 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


24 


25 


26 27 28 






23 
30 


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JULY 


28 


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28 


29 30 31 










MARCH 










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AUGUST 










DECEMBER 






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26 


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29 


30 


31 







COLLEGE CALENDAR 



SUMMER SESSION, 1962 



June 
July 

September 



11 Monday 

12 Tuesday 
18-22 Mon.-Fri. 

20 Friday 

21 Saturday 



Registration, 2 :00 p.m. 
Beginning of classes, 7 :45 a.m. 
School of Christian Studies 
Examinations 
Commencement exercises 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1962-1963 



December 
January 



January 
February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



6 Thursday 
7-11 Fri.-Tues. 
10 Monday 



N^ovember 



11 Tuesday 

12 Wednesday 
22 Saturday 

25 Tuesday 
1-3 Thurs.-Sat. 

8 Thursday 

13 Tuesday 
21 "Wednesday 

26 Monday 
16 Sunday 
20 Thursday 

3 Thursday 

18 Friday 

19-25 Sat.-Fri. 

26 Saturday 



Arrival of all new students 
Orientation program for all new students 
Eegistration of freshmen and transfer 

students 
Registration of returning students 
Beginning of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
Last day for class-schedule changes 
Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
Examinations in "block" courses 
Founders' Day 
Mid-semester reports due 
Beginning of Thanksgiving recess, 1 K)0 

p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
Program of Christmas music 
Beginning of Christmas recess, 1 :00 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
Reading Day 

First semester examinations 
Commencement exercises 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1962-1963 



29 Tuesday 

30 Wednesday 
8 Friday 

11-15 Mon.-Fri. 

22 Friday 

26 Tuesday 
26-28 Tues.-Thurs. 

27 Wednesdav 
11 Thursdaj 
17 Wednesday 

4 Saturday 

24 Friday ' 

25-31 Sat.-Fri. 

1-3 Sat.-Mon. 



Registration for second semester 

Beginning of classes, 8:25 a.m. 

Last day for class-schedule changes. 

Religious Focus Week 

Last day to file applications for degrees 

in June, 1963 
Meeting of the Board of Tru-^tees 
Examinations in "block" courses 
Mid-semester reports due 
Beginning of spring recess, 
Resumption of classes, 8:25 
May Day 
Reading Day 

Second semester examinations 
Commencement exercises 



1 :00 p.m. 
a.m. 



(6) 



ORGANIZATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

L. M. Massey Chairman 

Elizabeth J. Dotterer Vice-Chair man 

V. H. Belcher Secretary-Treasurer 

Terms Expire 1962 

Claudilene S. Bone Nashville 

Randolph Gregory "Wilmington 

J. M. Kesler Winston-Salem 

Charles O. Milford Charlotte 

Mary C. Norwood Goldsboro 

Herman A. Rhinehart Durham 

W. H. Weatherspoon Raleigh 

Terms Expire 1963 

Raymond A. Bryan Goldsboro 

C. C. Cameron Raleigh 

Foy J. Farmer Raleigh 

W. W. Finlator Raleigh 

L. M. Massey Zebulon 

Marvin L. Slate Higb Point 

W. Fred Williams Greensboro 

Terms Expire 196k 

Maude D. Bunn Raleigh 

Elizabeth J. Dotterer Sanford 

Paul Early Greensboro 

Hatcher S. Elliott Charlotte 

Hayden B. Hayes Hickory 

Ernest P. Russell Concord 

Straughan H. Watkins Henderson 

Terms Expire 1965 

Claude T. Bowers Raleigh 

Hubert M. Craig Lincolnton 

Charles B. Deane Rockingham 

lone K. Knight Madison 

E. L. Rankin, Jr. Raleigh 

Virginia L. Robertson Rocky Mount 

Virginia L. Wood Lraksville 

Executive Committee 
W. H. Weatherspoon, Chairman W. W. Finlator 

Elizabeth J. Dotterer, Vice-Chairman L_ Jf. Massey 

Maude D. Bunn E. L. Rankin, Jr. 

C. (J. Cameron -nr -c j tir-iv 

■r. T T W. Fred Williams 

Foy J. iarmer 

(7) 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



ADMINISTRATION 

President Carlyle Campbell, A.M., LL.D. 

Director of Public Relations Robert G. Deyion, A.B. 

Dean Leishman A. Peacock, Ph.D. 

Business Manager and Treasurer V. Howard Belcher, B.S. 

Dean of Students Louise E. Fleming, A.M. 



Library 

Records 

Student Personnel 

Religious Activities 
Health Service 



Alumnae Association 
Public Relations 
News Bureau 
Dining Hall 



Dormitories 

Equitation 
Supply Store 
Secretarial Staff 



Librarian Hazel Baity, A.B. in L.S. 

Asst. Librarian Jane Greene, A.B. in L.S., A.M. 
Assistant Virginia B. Pruden, A.B. 

Assistant Dorothy F. McCombs, A.B. 

Registrar Vera Tart Marsh 



Asst. Dean of Students 
Asst. Dean of Students 
Asst. Dean of Students 



Director 

Physician 

Nurse 

Nurse 



Lula M. Leahe, M.R.E. 

MaBelle Smith 

Joyce Causey, A.B. 

Miriam H. Prichard, A.M. 

William J. Senter, B.S., M.D. 

Edna Burst, R.N. 

Lucy H. Saunders, R.N. 



Executive Secretary 

Assistant 

Director 

Dietitian 

Assistant 

Hostess 



Mae Grimmer, A.B. 

Mary Bland Josey, A.B. 

Agnes Cooper, A.B. 

Bohbye Hunter 

Harriet Holler 

Frances E. Thome 



Acting House Director Martha J. Whilden 

Asst. House Director Lucille Dandridge 

Director Mary M. Edwards 

Manager Dru M. Hinsley, A.B. 

Secretary to the President Lois S. Renfrow 
Secretary to the Vice-President 

Carolyn Covington, A.B. 
Secretary to the Dean Mary K. Hamilton 

Secretary to the Registrar Virginia Banhhead 
Bookkeeper Faye F. Orders 

Secretary to the Business Manager 

Virginia Scarboro 
Secretary, Business Office Margaret L. Johnson 
Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Betty Jean T eager, A.B. 
Secretary, Alumnae Office Patricia H. Lewis 



ORGANIZATION 8 

FACULTYi 

CARLTLE CAMPBELL (1939), A.M., LL.D. President 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College ; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University ; LL.D., University of South Carolina, Wake Forest 
College 

LEISHMAN A. PEACOCK (1948), PH.D. Dean 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University ; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

ERNEST F. CANADAY (1920), PH.D. Professor of Mathematics 

A.B , William Jewell College; A.M., University of Missouri; Ph.D., 
Duke University 

ELLEN DOZIEB BREWER (1919), A.M. Professor of Home EconotnUiB 
A.B., Meredith College; B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

HARRY E. COOPER (19.37), MUS.D., F.A.G.O. Professor of Music 

A.B., Ottawa X'nlversity ; Mus.B., Horner Institute of Fine Arts ; 
Mus.D., Bu.sh Conservatory; Fellow, American Guild of Organists; 
Guy Weitz, London 

MARY YARBROUGH (1928), PH.D. Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
A.B., Meredith College; M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 
Duke University 

JOHN A. YARBROUGH (194.3), PH.D. Professor of Biology 

A.B., Oklahoma Baptist University ; M.S., University of Oklahoma ; 
Ph.D., State University of Iowa ; Graduate Student, Northwestern 
University 

QUENTIN OLIVER McALLISTER (15M4), PH.D. 

Professor of Foreifjn Languages 
A.B., A.M., Washington and Jefferson College; Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh 

RALPH E. McLAIN (1945), PH.D. Professor of Religion 

A.B., Muskingum College; Th.M.. Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; Graduate Student, Columbia University, University of 
Chicago 

MARY LYNCH JOHNSON (1918), PH.D.. L.H.D. Professor of English 
A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., Cornell 
University; L.H.D., Wake Forest College 

STUART rrtATT (1942), MtTS.M. Professor of Music 

A.B., Ilartwlck College; Mus.B., Philadelphia Musirnl Academy; 
Mus.M., Syraeu.ie University; Two years in Berlin; Marta Slebold, 
Hugo Kaun, Walter Scbarwenka, Egon Petri 



> The date nftor a name Indicates the first year of service at Meredith College. 



10 MEREDITH COLLEGE 



LILLIAN PARKER WALLACE (1921), PH.D. Professor of History 

A.B., University of Denver; M.S., North Carolina State College; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

ALICE BARNWELL KEITH (1928), PH.D. Professor of History 

B.S., Columbia University; JI.S., University of Tennessee; Graduate 
Student, Columbia University ; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

DAVID R. REVELET (1955), PH.D. Professor of Education 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College ; A.M., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

LESLIE W. STRON (1945), PH.D Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Mary Baldwin College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina 

NORMA ROSE (1937), PH.D. Professor of English 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 
Tale University 

BOGER H. CROOK (1949), TH.D. Professor of Religion 

A.B., Wake Forest College; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary ; Graduate Student, Duke University 

ETHEL TILLET (1951), PH.D. Professor of Psychology and Philosophy 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University ; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

JENNIE M. HANTEN (1931), A.M. Associate Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

BEATRICE DONLEY (1942), B.M. Associate Professor of Music 

B.M. (Voice), B.M. (Public School Music), West Virginia University; 
Voice with Horatio Connell, Juilliard School of Music ; Voice with 
Adelaide Gescjaeidt, New York 

HARRY K. DORSETT (1941), A.M. Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., Wake Forest College; A.M., Columbia University; Graduate 
Student, George Peabody College for Teachers 

SARAH McCULLOH LEMMON (1947), PH.D. Associate Professor of History 
B.S., Madison College ; A.M., Columbia University ; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina 

SUSANNE H. FREUND (1947), PH.D. 

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Abiturium, Berlin ; Ph.D., University of Heidelberg 

ZONE KEMP KNIGHT (1956), PH.D. Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Meredith College ; A.M., University of Pennsylvania ; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina 

LOIS FRAZIER (1954), ED.D. Associate Professor of Business and Economics 
B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.S., 
University of North Carolina ; Ed.D., Indiana University 



ORGANIZATION U 

LUCY ANN NEBLETT (1947), A.M. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., University of Texas; A.M., University of California at Los 
Angeles ; Graduate Student, University of Mexico, University of 
Havana, University of North Carolina, Inter-American University 

lilLA BELL (1941), M.ED. Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.Ed., 
I>uke University ; Graduate Student, Columbia University 

HELEN JO COLLINS (1944), M.S. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Colorado State Agricultural CoUege; M.S., Iowa State College 

JEAN SWANSON (1954), MUS.M., F.A.G.O. Assistant Professor of Music 
A.B., Macalester College; M.Mus., Northwestern University; Graduate 
Student, University of California, Union Theological Seminary School 
of Sacred Music ; Fellow, American Guild of Organists 

EDWIN K. BLANCHARD (1952), M.MUS.LIT. AsHstant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., M.Mus.Llt., Eastman School of Music 

IRA O. JONES (1957), PH.D. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Ph.B., University of Chicago ; A.M., Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

JAY D. MASSEY (1957), A.M. Assistant Professor of HcaUh and 

Pliysical Education 
B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; A.M., 
New York University 

JAMES H. EADS, JR. (1958), M.S. Assistant Professor of Biology 

A.B., University of Kansas ; M.S., University of Alabama 

PHYLLIS W. GARRTSS (1951), M.MUS. Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., B.M., Hastings College; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music 

BERNARD H. COCHRAN (19G0), PH.D. Assistant Professor of Religion 
AM., Stetson University ; B.D., Th.M., Southeastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary ; Ph.D., Duke University 

LUCY B. JEFFRIES (19C0), M.F.A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S'., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.F.A. , Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina 

ARTHUR C. DOWNS, JR. (1961). ED.D. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Philadelphia Museum College of Art; A.M., Ed.D., Columbia 
University 

JACK W. HICKMAN (1961), M.S. Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., United States Military Academy: Graduate Student, University 
of Sdutlicrn California: M.S., I'liiversity of Missouri; (iraduate 
Student, University of Florida 



12 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

MARGARET C. MARTINI (1953), A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Lang)iage» 
A.B., Meredith College ; A.M., Columbia University ; Graduate Student, 
George Peabody College for Teachers 

HELENA W. ALLEN (1952), B.S. Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

RUTH B. ROBINSON (1953), B.S. Instructor in Business 

B.S., Oregon State College 

VELMA MAE CORSAGE (1956), A.M. Instructor in Engligh 

B.F.A., Illinois Wesleyan University ; A.M., University of Arkansas 

ISABELLE HAESELER (195(i), M.S.M. Instructor in Mutio 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, M.S.M. , Union Theological Seminary ; 
Graduate student, Colorado Seminary, University of North CaroUna 

WILLIAM R. LEDPORD (1957), A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languagea 
A.B., Berea College; A.M., State University of lov/a ; Graduate 
Student, Middlebury College, University of North Carolina 

JAMES L. CLYBURN (1958), M.S. Instructor in Mutia 

A.B., Elon College; M.S., Juilliard School of Music 

DOROTHY P. GREENWOOD (1959), A.M. Instructor in Englislt 

A.B., Randolph-JIacon Woman's College; A.M., Tulane University; 
Graduate Student, Columbia University 

RICHARD D. GOFP (1961), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., Duke University ; A.M., Cornell University ; Graduate Student, 
Duke University 

DOROTHY K. PRESTON (1961), A.M. Instructor in MathematUst 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University 

VERNON O. STUAIPF (1961), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., A.M., University of Southern California ; Graduate Student, 
Duke University 

P. A. CLINE, JR. 2 (1962), A.B., B.D. Instructor in Foreign hanguagea 

A.B., Wake Forest College; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary ; Graduate Student, University of North Carolina 



1 First Semester, 19C1-'C2 
" Second Semester, l<(61-'62 



ORGANIZATION 13 



PART-TIME MEMBERS OF FACULTY 

ANNA B. PECK (I960), A.M. Geography 

A.B., A.M., University of Kentucky 

JULIA M. SNYDER (1960), M.S.P.H. Health Education 

B.S., College of Charleston; M.S.P.H., University of North Carolina 

ANN ELIZA BREWER (1961), A.M. Foreign Languages 

A.B., Meredith College ; A.M., Columbia University 

ELIZABETH S. CHAMBERLAIN (1961), A.M. English 

A.B., Wellesley College; A.M., University of Michigan 

HELEN P. KELMAN (1961) A.M. Biology 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; A.M., 
University of North Carolina 

rEANCES W. STEVENS (1961). A.M. Physical Education 

A.B., Mary Washington College; A.M., New Tort University 

JOSEPHINE C. BONDl (1962), M.S. Art 

B.S'., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 



FACULTY AND STAFF COMMITTEES FOR 1961-62 

Administrative Council — Mr. Campbell, Mr. Peacock, Mis.s Fleming, 
Miss Baity, Mrs. Marsh, Miss Brewer, Mr. Canaday, Mr. Cooper, 
Miss Frazier, Mrs. Jeffries, Miss Johnson, Mr. McAlli.ster, Mr. 
McLain, Mrs. Massey, Mr. Reveley, Miss Syron, Miss Tilley, Mrs. 
"Wallace, Mr. Yarbrough, Miss Yarbrough 

Auditorium — Miss Fleming, Mr. Belcher, Miss Gorsage, Mrs. Massey, 
Mr. Pratt 

Budget — Mr. McAllister, Miss Baity, Mr. Belcher, Mr. Blanchard, 
Mrs. Collins, Miss Frazier 

Concerts, Lectures — Miss Tilley, Mr. Cochran, Mr. Clyburn, Miss 
Donley, Mr. Yarbrough, Mrs. Wallace 

Curriculum — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Cooper, Mr. McAllister, Mr. McLain, 
Miss Rose, Mrs. Wallace, Miss Yarbrough 

Instruction — Miss Lemmon, Mr. Crook, Miss Johnson, Mr. Reveley, 
Miss Swanson, Miss Syron, Mr. Yarbrough 

Library — Miss Baity, Jlrs. Freund, Mrs. Greenwood, Mrs. Jeffries, 
Miss Neblett, Miss Tilley 



•Second Semester, 1961-'62 



14 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Orientation— Miss Josey, Mr. Dorsett, Miss Gorsage, Miss Haeseler, 
Miss Knight, Miss Leake 

Scholarships — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Canaday, Mr. Crook, Miss Fleming, 
Miss Lemmon, Miss Eose, Miss Yarbrough 

Social Functions — Miss Fleming, Miss Brewer, Miss Grimmer, Miss 
Hanyen, Mrs.. Hunter. Mrs. Marsh, Mrs. Whilden 

Student Government — Miss Fleming, Mr. Peacock, Mr. Eads, Mr. Jones, 

Miss Bell 

Student Health — Mrs. Hurst, Mrs. Allen, Mr. Belcher, Mrs. Collins, 
Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Smith 

Vocational Information — Miss Syron, Miss Causey, Mr. Dorsett, Miss 
Frazier, Mrs. Garriss, Miss Knight, Mr. McLain 

OFFICERS OF THE MEREDITH COLLEGE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 1961-62 

Mrs. J. E. Overby, Smithfield President 

Mrs. "William M. Watts, Asheboro Past President 

Mrs. J. Gordon Eiddick, Ealeigh Vice-President 

Mrs. Louis P. Xipper, Asheville Vice-President 

(Asheville Division) 

Mrs. Furman Covington, Thomasville Vice-President 

(Charlotte Division) 

Mrs. Gene Watson, Whitakers Vice-President 

(Elizabeth City Division) 

Mrs. Harry B. Clements, Greensboro Vice-President 

(Greensboro Division) 

Mrs. John E. Elam, Bladenboro Vice-President 

(Wilmington Division) 

Mrs. John A. Edwards, Ealeigh Recording Secretary 

Miss Mae Grimmer, Ealeigh Executive Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. J. W. Duke, Jr., Durham ) 

r Alumnae-at-Large 

Mrs. J. L. Sutton, Chapel Hill ) 

Mrs. William C. Burris, Chapel Hill Commencement Vocalist 



GENERAL INPORMATION 



Meredith College, founded by the North Carolina Baptist Con- 
vention, was granted a charter in 1891, and was first opened to 
students in September, 1899. It was chartered as the Baptist P^emale 
University, a name changed in 1905 to the Baptist University for 
Women, and in 1909 to Meredith College. This last name was 
given in honor of Thomas Meredith, for many years a recognized 
leader of the Baptist denomination in North Carolina, who in 1838 
presented to the Baptist State Convention a resolution urging the 
establishment in or near Raleigh of "a female seminary of high order 
that should be modeled and conducted on strictly religious principles, 
but that should be, so far as possible, free from sectarian influences," 

The institution has had four presidents: James Carter Blasingame, 
1899-1900; Eichard Tilman Vann, 1900-1915; Charles Edward Brewer, 
1915-1939; Carlyle Campbell, 1939—. 

LOCATION 

Meredith College, with a campus of 170 acres, is located in the 
capital city of North Carolina. This area, the educational center of 
the state, provides mauy religious, social, and educational advantages. 
The campus may be found on U. S. Route 1 in the Western part of 
the city. 

BUILDINGS 

The administration building, four dormitories, and the dining 
hall — all brick fireproof structures — form a quadrangle around a court. 
Johnson Hall contains on the first floor administrative offices and 
reception rooms; on the second floor the library and rooms for the 
use of non-resident students; and on the third floor an assembly room 
for the two literary societies. The dormitories — Brewer Hall, Faircloth 
Hall, Vann Hall, and Stringfield Hall — accommodate from 140 to 
170 students in each building. The rooms in the dormitories, planned 
for two students each, ai'o arranged in suites of two witti a connecting 
bath. P^acli occui)ant has a single bed and a closet of licr own. 
There is a social room on each floor. A kitchenette, a pressing room 
and a launderette are available in each dormitory. 

On the east side of the campus, adjoining the quadrangle, the 
new dormitory will be open for the fall semester, 1962. Jones Hall, the 
auditorium and music building erected at a cost of half-a-million dollars, 
was completed for use in 1950. The two-story building contains a largo 

(15) 



16 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

auditorium, a lobby, a reception room, and facilities for tbe Department 
of Music : studios, offices and classrooms, a small assembly hall, practice 
rooms, a music library, a listening room, a recording studio, an 
instrument storage room, and provision for organ pumps and equip- 
ment. Storage space and a set-construction shop under the main 
stage are provided for college dramatic productions. 

West of Vann Hall is Joyiier Hall, a modern classroom building 
of two floors opened in 1956. Included in the building are classrooms 
for non-scientific subjects, offices for faculty, a small auditorium 
equipped with visual aids, sound-proof recording booths for languages 
and speech classes, art studios and a small art gallery, seminar rooms, 
a lounge and a kitchenette. 

Hunter Hall, the new science building, is on the west side of the 
campus, located north of Joyner Hall. Here are classrooms and 
laboratories for biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, home eco- 
nomies and business, offices and research laboratories for faculty, 
science library, reception room, photographic darkroom, and a green- 
house. 

Northwest of Hunter Hall is the Ellen Brewer House which 
provides an opportunity for seniors in the Home Economics Depart- 
ment in small, rotating groups, under the guidance of an instructor, 
to gain actual experience in home management. Erected in 1959, 
it offers all the modern facilities of a homelike, convenient residence, 
including, in addition to the four bedrooms and baths, a study for 
student use, an office for the supervisor, a living room, a dining room, 
a family room and a kitchen. 

Adjoining the quadrangle west of the dining hall a modern in- 
firmary will be available for the fall semester, 1962. 

East of the dormitories are the physical education building, the 
campus store, and the post office. 

LIBRARY 

The library, located on the second floor of Johnson Hall, 
offers facilities for study, supplementary and recreational reading, 
and reference work. It contains approximately 43,500 volumes and 
a large number of pamphlets. The books are carefully selected by the 
librarian and the heads of departments to meet the needs of the 
students. The periodical room is supplied with the leading literary, 
scientific, and educational magazines, and state and national news- 
papers. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

As a distinctly Christian college, Meredith makes every effort 
to encourage the spiritual growth of its students. A Director of 
Religious Activities gives guidance and counsel to students in their 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

organized work and in their individual problems. Each year, in 

February, a visiting speaker is invited to the campus to lead students 

in a series of services looking toward deeper spiritual thinking and 
experience. 

All regular students are required to attend the chapel services 
five days each week. All resident students, except seniors, are also 
required to attend Sunday school and church services each Sunday 
morning, eight absences without excuse being allowed during the year. 

HEALTH 

A well-equipped infirmary under the direction of two graduate 
nurses and the College physician is maintained for the care of the 
sick and for the teaching of good health habits. Three daily office 
hours are observed by the nurses and emergencies are cared for at any 
hour. The College physician has designated office hours at the College 
at which time students may see him. It is the purpose of the physician 
and nurses to prevent illness by means of the knowledge and observance 
of the general laws of health. Health ratings based on a positive 
health program are recorded annually. 

A questionnaire, furnished by the College, must be completed 
and mailed directly to the Student Health Service, Meredith College, 
Raleigh, N. C. Physical examinations by the Health Service and 
the Department of Health and Physical Education will be made during 
the orientation program and completed as soon as possible thereafter. 
All necessary ocular and dental work should be attended to before 
students enter or during vacations. In emergencies this work may 
be done by specialists in Raleigh without loss of time from classes. 
These appointments as well as those with other physicians and dentists 
must be made through the College infirmary. 

RESIDENCE 

Students not living at their own homes or with near relatives 
are required to live in the College dormitories. Stringfield Hall and 
a section of Vann Hall are reserved for freshmen. 

Students should bring with them towels, sheets, pillows, pillow- 
cases, bedspreads, and all other bed coverings likely to be needed. 
All rooms are furnished with single beds. Curtains, draperies, rugs, 
and pictures will make the room more attractive. 

All laundry must be clearly marked with name tape. The laundry 
fee collected by the College covers the cost of flat work only. Each 
student may have laundered each week two sheets, two pillowcases, 
one bedspread, four towels, and one bureau scarf. 

All dormitories will be closed during the Christmas and Spring 
holidays. 



18 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Association. "Eacli student in coming to 
Meredith College accepts college citizensliip involving self-government 
under the honor code." On this concept, so defined in Article III, 
Section 2, of the constitution of the Student Government Association, 
all campus government is based. All Meredith students are thereby 
members of the Student Government Association, the chief purpose 
of which is the promotion of a high sense of honor as the basis of aU 
student government policy. Through the effective functioning of the 
honor code, the Association seeks to regulate the life of the students 
for the good of all concerned. The leadership of the Association is 
composed of three elected groups : the Legislative, Judicial, and Student 
Activity Boards. The Student Government Council, composed of the 
Student Government president and representatives, from each board, 
serves as the Executive Committee of the Association. A Faculty 
Committee on Student Government confers with these boards on major 
matters of discipline and policy. The Student Government Association 
holds regular meetings at the chapel period each Thursday, at which 
time the students have an opportunity to discuss matters of special 
interest to them. 

Religious Organizations. The religious activities of the students 
are under the general direction of the Baptist Student Union, its 
council including the officers of auxiliary organizations and a repre- 
sentative of students belonging to other churches than a Baptist church. 
Vespers and Family Altar provide worship opportunities on the 
campus. Study groups are held throughout the year for helpful think- 
ing and working together. Missionary opportunities are provided by 
the Young Woman's Auxiliary. Enjoyable parties, to which students 
from the neighboring colleges are sometimes invited, are also included 
in the programs of the Union. One week each year is set aside as 
Religious Focus Week, at which time Christian leaders from outside 
the college community are invited to direct student thinking in all 
areas of life. The character and number of religious activities fostered 
on the Meredith campus are evidence of the Christian purposefulness 
of Meredith students. 

Honor Society. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor Society, organized 
in 1923, has as its special aim the promotion of scholarship at Meredith. 
Members are admitted on the basis of scholastic standing maintained 
over a period of two years or more. Each year Kappa Nu Sigma 
presents some distinguished speaker, who is heard by the entire college 
community. 

Departmental Clubs. A means of cultural enrichment is offered 
students in the various departmental clubs at Meredith. These are 
the International Relations Club and tlie Meredith League of Women 
Voters, the Elizabeth Avery Colton English Club, the Creative Writing 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 

Club, the Barber Science Club, the Art Club, the French Club, the 
German Club, La Tertulia Spanish Club, the Canaday Mathematics 
Club, the Home Economies Club, the Sociology Club, the Tyner Future 
Teachers Club, the Granddaughters' Club, the Hoof Print Club, the 
Monogram Club, the Price Latin Club, the Freeman Keligion Club, 
Psi Chi (Psychology) and Tomorrow's Business Women. Most of 
these hold monthly meetings and aim at an approach to their subjects 
somewhat different from the distinctly academic. 

Literary Societies. Two societies, the Astrotekton and the Philare- 
tian, have been in existence since the early days of the College. In 
addition to the presentation of programs at regular meetings, each 
society offers a medal for the best essay written by one of its members 
during the academic year. 

The Silver Shield. Selection for membership in the Silver Shield, 
honorary leadership society of the College, is based upon Christian 
character, constructive leadership, and service to the College. Members 
are chosen from the senior and jimior classes at a public "tapping" 
ceremony. The Silver Shield was organized in 1935. 

Puhlications. There are three student publications at Meredith : 
The Twig, a newspaper, issued bi-weekly, in the columns of which 
College happenings are recorded and student opinion expressed; The 
Acorn, a literary journal published four times during the College year ; 
and Oak Leaves, the College yearbook. 

The Chorus. The Meredith Chorus, directed by a member of the 
music faculty, appears in concert at stated intervals throughout the 
College year. 

Sigma Alpha Iota. Music majors and candidates for the Bachelor 
of Music degree who meet the scholastic requirements and have the 
approval of the music faculty are eligible for membership in Sigma 
Alpha Iota. This national music fraternity for women encourages 
students by both awards and scholarships. 

The Phi Kappa Chapter of Sigma Pi Alpha was organized at 
Meredith in 1941. Sigma Pi Alpha is a national honorary modern 
language fraternity which seeks to recognize outstanding achievement 
in modern languages and to encourage active interest in the culture 
of the nations in which such languages are spoken. Students of Spanish, 
French, and German are selected on the basis of achievement and 
interest. 

The Meredith Playhouse. The Meredith Playhouse provides for 
students who are interested in dramatics both the opportunity to 
appear in plays and practical experience in play production. Several 
plays are presented during the winter. A chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, 



aO MEREDITH COLLEGE 

national honorary dramatic fraternity, gives special recognition to 
members of The Meredith Playhouse who excel in its activities. 

The Athletic Association. The Athletic Association cooperates 
with the Department of Health and Physical Education in planning 
a wide range of recreational activities, ^chery, badminton, basketball, 
bowling, equitation, field hockey, golf, Softball, volleyball, and tennis 
are among the activities offered. 

The four classes compete in the presentation of an original dra- 
matic production on Stunt Night. 



GENERAIi INFORMATION 21 

EXPENSES 

GENERAL FEES FOR THE YEAR 

Resident Students 

Tuition: instruction, library, lectures and recitals, 

academic administration $620.00 

Residence: room and board, laundry, infirmary service, 

maintenance — 630.00 

$1,250.00 
Non-resident Students 

Tuition (as above) $620.00 

SPECIAL FEES FOR EACH SEMESTER 

Applied Music (two half-hour lessons a week): 

Regular Students $50.00 or $60.00 

Part-Time Students and Special Students _— 100.00 

Use of practice room, with piano, one hour daily 9.00 

For each additional hour 6.00 

Use of organ, one hour daily - 30.00 to 50.00 

Use of practice room, without piano, one hour daily 5.00 

For each additional hour 4.00 

Course fee, for special and part-time students, for each credit hour 20.00 

Education 95, 96 35.00 

Golf 6.00 

Home Economics 93 or 93S 40.00 

Horseback Riding (two hours a week) 40.00 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Graduation fee, including diploma $10.00 

Gymnasium Costume (approximate cost) 12.00 

Late regi.<;tration 2.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Transcript of academic record (after first copy) 1.00 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 
For resident students: 

A fee of $25.00 must accompany each application of a new 
student. This fco will be credited on the account of those applicants 
who enter. A $15.00 refund will be made if the request is received by 
April 1. 

The registration foe of $25.00 for a student now in college 
who wishes to reserve a room for next session must bo paid before 
March 1. This fee will be credited on the account of those students 
who re-enter. The fee will be refunded if the request is received by 
June 15. 

The balance is payable as follows : 

For new student.s, on or before April 1 ; old students 
on or before June 15, for the ensuing session (not 

refundable) $ 50.00 

/ft the beginning of the First Somesfir 266.00 



22 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

On November 7 the balance of the amount for the 
first semester 

At the beginning of the Second Semester $430.00 

On March 26 the balance of the amount for the second 

semester 

For non-resident students: 

At the beginning of each semester $180.00 

On November 7 the balance of the amount for the first 
semester wOl be due. On March 26 the balance for the 
second semester will be due. 

The preceding statements as to charges and terms of payment 
are the equivalent of a contract between the College and its patrons. 
Neither the President nor the Business Manager is expected to modify 
these regulations without specific authorization from the Board of 
Trustees. 

In view of the prevailing uncertainty as to cost of labor and 
materials, the College reserves the right to change its fees for room 
and board at the beginning of each semester if conditions make it 
necessary. Patrons will be given advance notice of any change to be 
made. 

A student is not oilicially registered or entitled to enroll in any 
class until satisfactory financial arrangements have been made with 
the Business Manager. Under no circumstances will a student be 
allowed to take semester examinations or receive a transcript of her 
record until her account has been paid in full. 

A deduction of ten per cent is allowed where two or more students 
come from the same family. 

A regular college student whose father or husband is an active 
ordained minister or full-time religious worker is allowed a concession 
of $125.00 on her expenses for the year. Members of the junior and 
senior classes planning to be missionaries will receive, on certification 
by their local churches, an allowance of $100 on their expenses for the 
year. ; 

Students are not required to make a breakage deposit to -'cover 
unjustifiable damage to college property, but for such damage they will 
be expected to pay. 

Resident students are not charged for the ordinary services of 
the College physician and nurses, and for the use of the infirmary. 
For additional service in case of serious or prolonged illness, and 
for all special medical prescriptions, the patron is expected to pay. 

If a student withdraws or is dismissed from the institution 
before the end of a semester, no refund will be made for the quarter 
of the year in which she leaves. Proportionate refund may be allowed 
on residence charges if a student is continuously absent for at least 
four weeks because of illnesr. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOAN FUNDS, SELF-HELP 

Freshman Scholarships. The Board of Trustees authorizes the 
annual award of forty-five scholarships to resident members of the in- 
coming freshman class. Fifteen of these scholarships are valued at 
$400.00 each; thirty, at $250.00 each. Awards will be based on 
outstanding scholastic achievement and promise, qualities of social 
leadership, and financial need. Applications and supporting credentials 
should be submitted to the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee 
by February 15. 

Upper-Class Scholarships. The Board of Trustees authorizes 
the award of twenty-five scholarships, valued at $250.00 each, to 
resident members of the sophomore, junior, and senior classes. These 
awards will be based on outstanding scholastic achievement and 
promise, qualities of social leadership, and financial need. Applications 
and supporting credentials should be submitted to the Chairman of 
the Scholarship Committee by May 1. 

Endowed Scholarships. Friends of the College have established 
endowment funds for scholarship aid, the principal of which amounts 
to $.39,850. These funds provide for sixteen scholarships, as indicated 
below. In some cases the donors have made specific restrictions affect- 
ing the award of the scholarships, but students interested may write 
the President of the College. Value, $120.00. 

The J. T. J. Battle Scholarships (four) 

The Z. M. Cavcncss Scholarship 

The Mr. and ilrs. John E. Efird Scholarships (two) 

The Myrtle Hart Farmer Scholarship 

The Hester Farrior Scholarship 

The Fuller B. Ilamrick Scholarship 

The Ella G. Iloloomb Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Matthews Scholarship 

The Ida Poteat Scholarship 

The Emma Barber Towler Scholarships (two) 

The Mollic B. Wyatt Hcholarsliip 

The Helen Price Scholarship. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor 
Society awards to the freshman who maintains the highest scholastic 
average during her first year in college a scholarship valued at $100. 
The Society reserves the right to withhold or to change the value of 
the award if circumstances require adjustment. 

The Perry-Uarris Scholarship. A $200 scholarship given by Dr. 
Julia Hamlet Harris in memory of her mother, Mrs. Ella Perry 
Harris, to a student who has completed one year of study at Meredith 
in the upper fifth of her class. Preference will be given to a student 
majoring or planning to major in English. 



24 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

The Ruth Ann Huhbell Creative Writing Award. The interest 
on $500, the gift of Miss Hubbell, an alumna, will be given each year 
to that student whose work submitted in competition for the award 
gives best evidence of ability and sustained interest in creative writing. 
Details may be obtained from the Department of English. 

Lillie Grandy Scholarship Fund. Granted under the will of the 
late Miss Lillie Grandy of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, the income 
from this fund makes available for the year 1962-63, eight $300.00 
scholarships. Applicants must be residents of Camden County or 
Pasquotank County, North Carolina, and must have completed the first 
year at Meredith College and "have proven to the faculty during their 
freshman year that they have intellectual ability and sterling character." 
These scholarships may be renewed during the junior and senior years 
if in the judgment of the faculty the recipients prove themselves 
worthy. Applications should be submitted to the Chairman of the 
Scholarship Committee. 

College Loan Funds. Earnings from the funds listed are available 
for loan purposes to students in residence. Inquiries should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. V. Howard Belcher, Business Manager and Treasurer, 
Meredith College. 

The Elizabeth Avery C«lton Loan Fund 

The Louis M. Curtis Loan Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. 0. S. Goodwin Loan Fimd 

The Mabel L. Haynes Loan Fund 

The John M. W. Hicks Loan Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs. John Billingsley Ingram Loan Fund 

The Henrietta S. Jarman Loan Fund 

The Edna Tyner Langston Loan Fimd 

The Helen Josephine Neal Loan Fund 

The Olive Chapel Loan Fund 

The "William H. Keddish Loan Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Stanback Loan Fund 

The W. A. Thomas Student Loan Fund 

The National Defense Student Loan Program. The National 
Defense Education Act provides for the creation, at American Colleges 
and Universities, of loan funds for which needy students may borrow 
on reasonable terms for the purpose of completing their higher 
education. This act requires that special consideration be given to 
students with superior academic backgrounds who intend to teach 
in public elementary or secondary schools or those whose academic 
background indicates superior capacity or preparation in science, 
mathematics, or a modern foreign language. Students interested in 
knowing more about this loan program should consult Mr. V. H. 
Belcher, Business Manager and Treasurer, Meredith College. 



GENBRAL INFORMATION 26 

The Ida Poteat Loan Fund. This fund haa been provided for 
juniors and seniors through the alumnae of the College. Application 
blanks will be furnished upon request addressed to Miss Mae Grimmer, 
Alumnae Secretary, Meredith College. 

Self-Help. Many students needing financial assistance reduce 
their expenses by part-time employment in the dining room, in the 
library and in various offices and academic departments of the college. 
Compensation varies with the character and amount of service rendered, 
but usually ranges from $125 to $250 for the year. Initial correspond- 
ence may be addressed to the President or to the Business Manager. 
Available appointments will be made on the basis of apparent ability 
and need. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1962 



During the summer of 1962 the College will operate a six-week 
term beginning Jxme 11 and ending July 21. Admission to the 
summer session is on the same basis as in the regular year. Graduates 
of accredited high schools who are planning to enter college in Septem- 
ber may begin some regular courses here in June. Attendance at the 
summer session will enable a student to complete her work in less 
than the usual time. The maximum amount of credit is six semester 
hours for the summer session (i.e., three hours each for two courses 
meeting daily). 

Regular academic courses will be available in several fields of 
instruction, including music. Private lessons may be arranged in this 
field. 

Full information about the summer session may be obtained by 
writing to the Dean of the College. 



AD2W1SS10N 

Students may be admitted to Meredith College as candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts either as members of the freshman 
class or as students with advanced standing from other colleges. 
Before being accepted, candidates must present credentials giving 
satisfactory evidence that in scholarship, health, and character they 
are qualified for the educational program and standards maintained 
in this institution. 

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 
Communications with regard to entrance should be addressed to 
the President of the College, who, upon request, will mail an application 
for admission. Applications, with the appropriate fee, should be re- 
turned to the President. 

Arrangements should be made by the applicant to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and the Writing Sample of the College 
Entrance Examination Board, details of which are given below. 
Not earlier than the close of the first semester for each freshman 
applicant the Dean will secure from the proper school official a 
certified academic record showing units, grades, and rank in graduating 
class. It is at this time that the student applying for advanced 
standing should request a complete transcript of her college work be 
sent to Meredith. 

Each student wiU be notified concerning her admission as promptly 
as possible after records have been evaluated. When an applicant is 
notified that she qualifies academically for admission, she is then 
sent a medical form to be completed by her physician and also a 
dormitory placement sheet. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN 

Secondary School Worh 

For admission to the freshman class, high school gi'aduates must 
offer a minimiun of sixteen units of credit. A unit represents a year's 
study of a subject in a secondary school, and is estimated to be 
equivalent to one-fourth of a full year's work. 

Of the sixteen units presented, four must be in English ; nine 
must be chosen from language, history, social studies, mathematics 
and natural science ; three additional units are required in these 
subjects or from eleetives approved by Meredith College. If a foreign 
language is included, at least two units in one language must be 
presented. 

Each student applying for admission from a secondary school 
must rank in the upper half of her graduating class. It is to be 
noted that three-fourths of the freshmen entering in September, 1961, 
ranked in the upper quarter of their graduating classes. 

(26) 



ADMISSION 27 

College Board Examinations 

All applicants including transfer students are expected to take 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board, and the Writing Sample given as a part of the afternoon tests. 
Applicants to Meredith are urged to complete these tests in either 
December or January. The applicant's total high school record, her 
rank in the graduating class, several recommendations, and, wherever 
possible, a personal interview are important considerations!. 

Eor 1962-63, the three-hour Scholastic Aptitude Test, administered 
at several centers in each state, will be given during the morning 
on the following dates : 
Saturday, December 1, 1962 Saturday, March 2, 1963 

Saturday, January 12, 1963 Saturday, May 18, 1963 

Wednesday, August 14, 1963 

The student should write as soon as possible directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N". J., and 
request a Bulletin of Information and a descriptive booklet, both 
publications obtainable without charge. (These publications often 
may be obtained from high school officials.) The Bulletin gives 
detailed information about fees ($5.00 for the morning test, $2.00 for 
the Writing Sample) ; the cities where the examination centers are 
located ; and dates when applications are to bo returned for each 
date listed above. The descriptive booklet, entitled A Description of 
the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test, gives a brief description 
of the test and sample test questions. 

Each student considering Meredith should indicate on the test 
application card that she wishes the report of her scores sent to 
Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. 

EARLY DECISION PLAN 

For the unquestionably well-qualified student who definitely desires 
to enter Meredith College there is designed an Early Decision Plan. 
Under this plan the applicant must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
of the College Entrance Examination Board before her senior year 
in high school. She should file ajiplication for admission to the College, 
with the appropriate fee, by September 15 of her senior year, requesting 
in an accompanying letter that her ajiplication receive an "early de- 
cision" and certifying that she is, therefore, applying only to ^lorcdith. 
On the basis of Junior year test scores, the applicant's three-year high 
school record, together with a notice of courses being pursued in the 
senior year and recommendations from school officials, the admissions 
officer will accept the qualified applicant by October 15 of her senior 
year. Dormitory students will be requested to make an advance pay- 
ment of $50.00 by November 15. This advance payment is not 
refundable. 



28 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

If, however, credentials do not justify early acceptance, the 
applicant will be notified in the fall either that her application htia 
been rejected or that action on the application will be deferred until 
the spring semester. In the latter case students will be asked to repeat 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test and to enroll for the Writing Sample 
on the December or January testing date; and they will, of course, 
be free to file applications at other institutions if they desire. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED STANDING 

A student applying for advanced standing should present the 
following information: (a) an official transcript of her record, in- 
cluding a statement of honorable dismissal, from the institution last 
attended; (b) details of the units offered for college entrance and the 
name of the high school from which the entrance units were received; 
(c) satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board; (d) a Writing Sample of the Collie 
Entrance Examination Board taken during the academic year im- 
mediately prior to entering Meredith. 

Students who have completed two years of college work should 
indicate the major and other subjects which they expect to pursue. 
Students admitted from other colleges with fewer quality points than 
semester hours of credit must make up the deficiency at Meredith 
College. 

When the candidate comes from a college belonging to the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, or an association of 
related rank, she will be given credit for the courses acceptable toward 
a degree at Meredith College. 

Candidates from other colleges will be given provisional credits 
which must be validated by success in work undertaken at Meredith 
College, or by examinations. In order to validate the provisional 
credit allowed a student from a non-accredited institution, other than 
by examination, she must make a minimum of twenty-four semester 
hours and twenty-four quality points during her first two semesters 
at Meredith. A student who fails to reach this standard will have 
her provisional credits reduced in number by the deficiency in houra 
or quality points. 

The maximum credit accepted from a junior college is sixty-two 
semester hours. Not more than thirty-two semester hours will he 
accredited for the work of either year in a junior college. 

A student transferring to Meredith at the beginning of the junior 
year will be expected to take at Meredith at least twelve hours in 
the department in which she is a major. A student transferring at 
the beginning of the senior year will be expected to take at Meredith 
at least nine hours in the department in which she is a major. 



ADMISSION 29 

RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student desiring to return to the College after an absence of 
more than a year should apply to the Dean for re-admission. Official 
transcripts of record at all other institutions should be submitted, 
together with a statement of honorable dismissal. vSuch a student wiU 
comply with the requirements either of the catalogue under which 
Bhe is re-admitted, or of a subsequent catalogue. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Part-time students are understood to be those qualifying for a 
degree who enroll for not more than nine credit hours a semester. 
Such students will meet the entrance requirements outlined above. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

A student of mature age who gives evidence of a serious purpose 
and who is otherwise properly qualified is allowed to enter a special 
course without fulfilling the entrance requirements. All such courses 
must be approved by the Dean and the instructor concerned, but will 
not receive college credit. 

ORIENTATION-REGISTRATION 

All students, upon arrival in the city, should enroll promptly 
at the office of the Dean of Students. Dormitories will be open to 
receive freshmen and transfer students at 2 :00 p.m. on Thursday, 
September 6. The registration and orientation program begins at 
8 :30 a.m. on Friday, September 7. Returning students should ar- 
rive in time to complete their registration by 3 :00 p.m. on Tuesday, 
September 11. All students who fail to complete registration on the 
date specified must pay a special fee of two dollars. 

All freshmen and all transfer students are expected to take part 
in the special program arranged for the opening week. Included in 
this program will bo a physical examination, instruction in the use 
of the library, social activities and achievement tests, English and 
language placement tests, registration, and talks on various phases 
of college life. 



ACADBiWlC REGULATIONS 

Meredith College confers two degrees, that of Bachelor of Arts 
and that of Bachelor of Music. To be eligible for a degree, a student 
must meet the academic requirements for the degree and must be a 
person of unquestionably good character.^ 

The requirements for these degrees are based on the general 
principle of a broad distribution of studies among the representative 
fields of human culture and a concentration of studies within a special 
field. The object of distribution is to give the student a general view 
of our cultural heritage and to broaden her outlook. The object of 
concentration is to aid the student in acquiring comprehensive knowl- 
edge and systematic training in a particular field of scholarly achieve- 
ment. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Hours: A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must 
complete at least 120 semester hours of work. Each semester hour 
of credit is supposed to represent for the average student three hours 
of academic work a week, including preparation, classes and labora- 
tories. 

Residence: Every candidate for the degree must attend Meredith 
College for one full year, with not less than thirty semester hours of 
credit. If she enters from a senior college not approved by the 
Southern Association or by an association of related rank, she must 
attend for at least two years. The last thirty semester hours must 
be taken at Meredith College, except that not more than six^ semester 
hours may be taken at another institution of approved standing.^ 

A student who completes the work required by the College for 
the Bachelor's degree will be granted the degree at the end of that 
session. 

Grades: The College requires that all students maintain at least 
an average grade of C in : 

1. All grades of courses offered for graduation. 

2. All grades of courses completed at Meredith. 

3. All grades of courses completed at Meredith in the field of 

concentration. 



' A student may elect to follow the degree requirements listed in any subsequent 

catalogue in force during her period of residence. 
' See exception, P. 34. 
'These exceptions do not apply to senior transfer students. 

(30) 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 31 

4. All grades of courses completed at Meredith in the major 
subject. 

5. All grades of courses completed in the senior year. 
I. Prescribed Courses 

To be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, a 
candidate must have completed 53 to 70 hours from the prescribed 
courses listed below. These course requirements should be met by the 
end of the junior year. 

Semester 
Hours 

Art or Music. Art 31, 59, GO or Music 1 and 2 or 26 3-6 

Students majoring in art or music will be excused from this re- 
quirement. Those majoring in elementary education may substitute 
Music 33, 34 or Art 43, Ed. SG Art ; those majoring in home 
economics may substitute Art 62. 

English. English 1-2, English 21-22 13 

Foreign Language 6-18 

High School Units Offered College Requirements 

None IS hrs. in one language or 

12 hrs. in each of two 

Two units in one language 12 hrs. in any language 

Two units in each of two languages 6 hrs. in one of these or 

12 hrs. in a third language 

Four units in one language G hrs. in that language 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences 12-14 

Biology 1-2; Chemistry 1-2; Mathematics 1, 2; Physics 21-22. 
Majors in home economics may substitute Biology 64 for Biology 2. 

Social Studies 12 

Economics 21, 22; Geography 21, 22; History 1-2; Political Science 
21, 22; I'sychology 21; Sociolow 21, 22. At least six hours in one 
subject. History 1-2 is required for all students except those who offer 
two units in history, one of which must lip in world or European 
history. Juniiir and senior transfer students may substitute for 
History 1-2 a eoursf in European History agreed upon by the Dean 
and the Chairman of the Department of History. Majors in home 
economics may substitute Sociology 74 for ;^ociology 22. 

Religion. Religion 1, 2 6 

Health Education. Health Edueation 1-2 2 

Students transferrinj; to Meredith College as juniors or seniors will be 
excused from this rexiuirement. Elementary Education majors should 
consult certificate requirements. 

Physical Education 

Only one course in physical education will be required during any one 
semester except for the student who failed a course In physical education 
the previous semester. Students enrolled for Physical Education 86 nuiy 
substKiite this for an activity course for that semester. 



32 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Students entering Meredith must successfully complete physical educa- 
tion courses according to the following program — unless excused by the 
Dean: 

Those entering as first-year students — three years 
Those entering as second-year students — two years 
Those entering as third-year students — one year 

II. Field of Concentration 

Each student will select a field of concentration consisting of 
forty-two semester hours distributed as follows : eighteen to twenty-four 
semester hours in a major subject and twenty-four to eighteen semester 
hours in one or two related subjects, with a minimum of six semester 
hours in a subject. The field of concentration may not include any 
courses open primarily to freshmen. Required courses not open pri- 
marily to freshmen may count as a part of the field of concentration. 

Concentration in a field of study is intended to be more than a 
series of unrelated courses listed in the catalogue under several depart- 
ments. The work required of each student in a field of concentration 
should be planned by the major department as a unified, coherent whole, 
consisting of closely related courses. The requirements of a depart- 
mental major in a field of concentration are listed under each depart- 
ment. Without consent of the administrative council, a student may 
not change her major subject after becoming a senior. 

Not later than the close of the sophomore year, a candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts shall select a departmental major. 
When this selection has been approved by the department concerned, 
the head of that department becomes the adviser of the student in her 
field of concentration. The program of studies arranged by the head 
of the department and the student for the student's field of concentration 
must receive the final approval of the dean. 

The major must be selected from the following list of subjects: 

Art History 

Biology Home Economics j 

Business Mathematics 

Chemistry Music 

Economics Psychology and Philosophy 

Elementary Education Religion 

English Sociology 

Foreign Languages — French, Spanish 

The related subject or subjects may be selected either from the 
above list of major subjects or from the following list of subjects: 

Geography Latin 

German Philosophy 

Government Speech 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 33 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Music will be granted to students who 
already hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and 
meet the requirements as stated on page G6 of the catalogue. One 
additional year of study confined exclusively to music will usually be 
necessary to secure this degree. 

During their course of study, students will be expected to conform 
to the regulations for seniors, including class attendance and scholastic 
attainment. 

THE FRESHIMAN YEAR 

Usually freshmen will register for the following courses: English 
1-2, Health Education 1-2, physical education, a foreign language, 
and three courses chosen from history, mathematics, religion or the 
natural sciences. Some variation from this schedule may be necessary 
for students planning to major in art, home economics or music. 

The sixteen hours normally to be taken each semester should be 
chosen from the following courses : 

Art 1, 2 History 1-2 

Biology 1-2 Home Economics 1, 4 

Chemistry 1-2 Latin 1-2 ; 21-22 

English 1-2 Mathematics 1, 2 

French 1-2 ; 21-22 Music (See Department) 

German 1-2; 21-22 Religion 1, 2 

Health Education 1-2 Spanish 1-2; 21-22 

REGULATIONS CONCERNING COURSES 

Registration and Withdrawal. As every student schedule must 
be approved by the Dean, a student may enter or withdraw from a 
course only on his authority. 

A student may be permitted by the Dean to drop a course during 
the first six weeks of a semester without penalty. Thereafter she will 
receive an F grade on the course if that grade represents the quality of 
work done for the period. 

Amount of Work. No regular student is permitted to take fewer 
than fourteen semester hours of classvvork a week without permission 
of the Dean, except that under the following conditions students may 
register for only twelve hours : seniors enrolled for the course in super- 
vised teaching; a music major with a recital to prepare; a student in 
poor health or one engaged in outside work that demands much of her 
time. 

No student may register for more than sixteen hours if she failed 
to make an average grade above C for the preceding semester. 



34 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

The maximum number of credit hours allowed during any 
semester for any student taking physical education is eighteen; for 
other students the maximum is nineteen hours. 

Prescribed Courses. Prescribed courses take precedence over 
elective courses in. the schedule of work for a semester. 

During her freshman and sophomore years a student may not 
take concurrently two courses in the same department without the 
permission of the Dean. 

Students who do not complete the foreign language requirement 
in the freshman year must continue to study until the requirement is 
met. 

Restricted Credit for Juniors and Seniors. Twelve hours of 
credit in courses primarily for freshmen may be taken in the junior 
and senior years, not more than six hours of which may be taken 
during the senior year. 

Credit in Music. A maximum of twenty-four semester hours in 
music may be counted by students not majoring in music as elective 
credits towards the Bachelor of Arts degree. All such credit in applied 
music must be validated by equal credit (with a grade of C or better) 
in courses selected from Theory or History and Literature. 

A maximum credit of four semester hours is allowed all students 
in ensemble courses— chorus or orchestra. This credit need not be 
substantiated by work in theoretical music. 

Maximum Credit in a Subject. The maximum amount of work 
that a student may take in any one subject, other than the Department 
of Music, is forty hours. Students having a major in the Department 
of Music may take a maximum of sixty semester hours from the various 
subdivisions of that department. 

Repeating Courses. A course may be repeated only if the student 
registers for the course the next time it is offered. If this is impossible 
because of schedule conflict with another required course, the student 
must register with the Dean her intention of taking the course as soon 
as there is no conflict with any other required course. 

Correspondence Credit. A maximum credit of six semester hours 
may be allowed for correspondence courses (with a' grade of or 
higher) after written permission has been obtained from the Dean. 

Deficiency in English. The Department of English may require 
special work in composition of a student who submits to any depart- 
ment a paper containing gross errors in English composition. 

Final Work for a Degree. Not more than six semester hours 
may be taken in another institution of approved standing as the final 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 35 

work necessary for graduation, except in the case of four-hour courses, 
in which ease eight hours of credit will be allowed. Such courses most 
be approved in advance by the Dean. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Students must be regular and prompt in their attendance at all 
classes, conferences, and other academic appointments. They must 
accept full responsibility for any announcements or a8signm.ents missed 
because of absence. Such absences, even when permitted, tend to lower 
a student's standing in courses. 

In each class during a semester as many absences will be allowed 
as there are class sessions per week. This ruling includes absences 
from classes, private lessons in music, and laboratory periods. This 
number will ordinarily suffice for absences due to illness as well as to 
other causes. 

Absences from class at the last session before or the first session 
after a holiday (except for sickness in the College infirmary, or off 
the campus with a statement from a physician, parent, or guardian) 
will be counted as two absences if these absences come within two 
days before or after a holiday. 

Absence because of illness — in the infirmary, or off the campus 
with a statement from a physician, parent or guardian — will be counted 
as one-third of an absence. For non-resident students a written excuBe 
should be handed to the Registrar upon the student's return to classes. 
Absences due to extended illness may he excused at the discretion of the 
Dean. Absence caused by the serious illness or the death of a member 
of the immediate family will also be counted as one-thii-d of an absence. 

"When arranged for in advance by the Dean, a student on the 
eligibility list may have as many as three additional absences from 
each course, without penalty, to attend meetings of an officially 
recognized campus organization, to represent the College as a whole, 
or to participate in academic off-campus activities. 

Absences beyond the number allowed will be classified as unexcused, 
and one quality point or fraction thereof will be deducted from the 
total number of quality points for the semester for each absence or 
fractional absence imexcused. 

The following regulation will apply to students taking physical 
education activity courses: 

A student is required to attend at least 80% of the semester's 
class sessions in order to receive a passing grade in the course. 
Absences are thus provided for illness — except in the case of extended 
illness. 



36 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

In cases of extended illness, the Dean and the Department Head 
will confer with the infirmary, and make provision either to permit 
work to be made up, or to recommend that the student drop the 
course. 

All absences will be reported as usual to the Registrar, who, in 
turn will post these on the board with other absences. 

Students registered in Education 95 are granted two full days 
of absence from regular college classes beyond those provided for above. 

Students authorized by the Department of Education to do 
substitute teaching in the city schools may be excused from classes 
on that day. 

Students on the Dean's List and Seniors (academic classification) 
are granted optional class attendance except at the last session of a 
class before or the first session after a holiday. If they have not 
incurred more than one absence from each class preceding a holiday, 
they are entitled to one absence from each class session immediately 
preceding or following the holiday. For class absences on these days 
in excess of this provision (except for sickness in the College infirmary, 
or off the campus with a statement from a physician, parent or 
guardian), quality points will be deducted from the total number of 
quality points earned that semester. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Each course receives one official semester grade, an evaluation 
of the entire work of the student during the semester. The grade 
of scholarship is reported in letters; A, B, C, and D indicate passing 
grades; F indicates failure. A grade of Inc. indicates that the student's 
work is incomplete. If an Inc. is not completed during the next 
semester, it automatically becomes an F. 

QUALITY POINTS / 

The minimum scholastic average of C, or a credit ratio of 1.0, 
required of a candidate for a degree, is determined by the quality 
points to which her course grades entitle her. Each semester hour 
with a grade of A carries three quality points; B, two; C, one. 

Quality point deductions made because of excessive class absences 
will be applied in computing the total number of quality points for 
graduation, for Dean's List standing, for eligibility, and for retention. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 37 

ELIGIBILITY LIST 

The requirements for inclusion on the eligibility list as stated 
by the Faculty Committee on Student Government are as follows: 

1. That a student should have been registered for at least twelve 
hours of work (with the exception of seniors who are engaged 
in their supervised teaching) ; 

2. That she should have completed and passed all courses with 
an overall average of C or better for the preceding semester; 

3. That her conduct be approved by the Dean of Students. 

DEAN'S LIST 

At the end of each semester there is published a Dean's List of 
students who have attained high scholastic standing. In this list are 
names of students registered for at least twelve hours. They should 
have completed and passed all courses with a number of quality points 
equal to twice the number of semester hours taken plus three. 

A student may be removed by the Dean from this list during the 
semester if her conduct or grades are such as to make removal advisable. 

GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts with distinction is conferred upon 
a student under the following conditions: 

(1) A student must have been in residence at Meredith College 
at least two years and must have earned a minimum of sixty 
semester houi-s. 

(2) For the purpose of computing the standing of a student all 
semester hours taken for degree credit at Meredith College 
are counted. 

(3) Those whose average is two and two-tenths quality points per 
semester hour are graduated cu7n laude; those whose average 
is two and seven-tenths quality points per semester hour are 
graduated magna cum laude; those whose average is two and 
nine-tenths quality points per semester hour are graduated 
Humina cum lavde. 

No student shall be graduated with distinction unless her grades 
on all her college work, including any taken at other colleges, meet 
the required standards sot up for such honors. 



38 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

CLASSIFICATION 

Students are classified at the beginning of each semester. To 
be classified as a sophomore, a student raust have at least twenty-three 
semester hours of credit and sixteen quality points; to be classified 
as a junior, at least fifty-six hours of credit and fifty quality points; 
to be classified as a senior, at least eighty-six hours of credit and 
eighty-four quality points. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Final examinations are held in all courses at the end of each 
semester. Xo credit should be expected for a course if the examination 
is not taken as scheduled, unless another date is authorized by the 
Dean and the instructor concerned. A special fee will be charged for 
individual examinations thus allowed. 

Seniors have examinations at the same time as other students, 
except that seniors who have examinations on the last Thursday and 
Friday of the second semester will take them on the preceding Thursday 
and Friday. 

At the end of each semester a report is sent to the parent or 
guardian of a student, showing her grade of scholarship and absences 
from classes. 

RETENTION OF STUDENTS 

During each semester of her first college year a student must pass 
at least six semester hours. However, in order to continue beyond her 
first college year, a student must have passed a minimum of fifteen 
hours. She must, also, have passed enough additional hours, or 
have accumulated enough quality points, so that the total of semester 
hours and quality points is at least twenty-four. 

After the first year in college a student must pass a minimum of 
nine semester hours each semester. Unless she has also accumulated 
nine quality points for the same semester, she will be placed on 
academic probation for the following semester. Probationary status 
will not be permitted for two successive semesters. A written notice 
of such probation will be sent to the parents and to the student. 

Before a student is jjermitted to register for her third college 
year she must have accumulated, during regular and summer sessions, 
a minimum of forty-four semester hours and thirty-eight quality 
points. 

A student who does not meet these minimum requirements will be 
dropped from the College for one semester. She may apply for re- 
admission either by submitting a transcript of work completed at 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 39 

another approved institution or in some other way demonstrating to 
the College authorities that she is qualified to continue at Meredith. 
Summer school credits, while encouraged, will not be considered as 
the equivalent of one full semester of regular college work. 

The College reserves the right to exclude at any time a student 
whose academic standing or conduct it regards as imdesirable, without 
the necessity of preferring specific charges against her. 



VOCATIONAL PREPAKATION 

The College offers certain phases of vocational education on the 
college level and not in competition with the purely professional and 
vocational schools. Students may enter, among others, the following 
fields: 

1. Business 5. Religion 

2. Graduate Study C. Social Welfare 

3. Library Work 7. Teaching 

4. Medicine, Medical Technology, a. Elementary 

Nursing b. Secondary 

The College offers courses of instruction leading to a major in 
Business. This course is not open to freshmen. This training qualifies 
students to hold positions in the business world. Courses in shorthand 
and typewriting are also available (without credit) to prospective 
librarians, religious and social workers, teachers, or other students not 
majoring in business. 

Students planning to enter professional schools or to do graduate 
work after leaving Meredith should secure advance information about 
the requirements which they must satisfy. The Dean of the College 
will be glad to assist the individual student, in keeping with the 
degree requirements of this institution, to plan her course of study 
with these aims in view. 

In the natural sciences, fully accredited pre-professional courses 
are offered for laboratory technicians, nurses, and students of medicine. 

The Department of Religion trains teachers of Bible and personnel 
for association and local church work. 

Because of the increasing demand for various types of trained 
social workers, the curriculum has been expanded to include all 
prerequisites for professional training at accredited schools of social 
work. 



40 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

SUMMER SESSION CREDITS 

A student wbo plans to attend a summer session at another 
accredited college should make application for transfer credit through 
the Dean's office. She will also secure the written approval of appro- 
priate heads of departments for courses she plans to take. The 
maximum credit allowed for a summer term is on the hasis of one 
semester hour per week. Eligibility status is not affected by summer 
session credits. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Official withdrawal of resident students is made in the office 
of the Dean of Students. Withdrawal of non-resident students is 
made in the office of the Dean of the College. 

Failure to make official withdrawal forfeits the right of honorable 
dismissal. 



COURSES or INSTRUCTION 

A course with an odd number is given the first semester ; a course with an 
even number, the second semester. If an S follows the odd number, the 
course is repeated in the second semester; if an F follows the even number, 
the course- is also offered in the tirst semester. 

A course with two numbers continues throushout the year. If the numbers 
are connected with a hyphen, no permanent credit is allowed until the full 
year's work is completed. 

A course numbered below 20 is for freshmen ; from 21 to 49, for sopho- 
mores ; from 51 to S9, for juniors and seniors ; above 90, for seniors only 
except by special permission. 

Brackets enclosing the number and title of a course indicate that the 
course is not given for the current year. 

The College does not guarantee to offer any course listed below for which 
there is not a minimum registration of five students. 

A "block" course is taught for the first half of a semester, six days a 
week, with student teaching under supervision during the .second half of the 
semester. 

ART 

Lucy Bane Jeffries, Assistant Professor 

Arthur C. Do-wns, Assistant Professor 

Josephine C. Bond, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major: courses 1, 2, 21, 22, 50, 60, 9S; and advanced 
courses to total twenty-four hours. Courses 1, 2 do not count toward the 
major. 

1, 2. BEGINNING DRAWING AND COMPOSITION 

Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Two lectures and four studio hours a week. 
An introductory course in basic design. Emphasis is placed upon the 
elements and principles of design with particular attention to drawing and 
composition in the fall semester and to the use of color in the spring semester. 
Studio problems involve the use of a variety of materials. Through group 
and indiviiluMl criticism, the development of individual creative ability Is 
encouraged. 

Prerequisite for Art 2 : Art 1 or Art 4'A. 

Credit for Art 1 given upon completion of Art 2, Art Ed. SOA 

or Art 02. Mrs. Jeffries 

21, 22. CREATIVE DESIGN Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 1, 2. 

A course offering the student an opportunity to develop creativeness In 
two and tlireedimensional design and technical ability in the use of various 
materials. Mr. Downs 

26. CERAMICS Credit, Three Hours 

An Introductory course In ceramic processes and material. Projects In 

coll, slab, and wheel metliods of construction. Experimentation with various 

types of decoration. 

Not open to freshmen except by special permission. Mr. Downs 

(41) 



42 MEREDITH COLLEGE 



29. ADVANCED DRAWING Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio liours a week. 
Prerequisite : Art 1, 2. 
Problems in slcetehiug, figure drawing, illustration and perspective 
drawing. Mr. Downs 

31, 31S. ART APPRECIATION Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to satisfy the need of general students for a key to 
the enjoyment of art. Through illustrated lectures and class discussions, 
the art of past cultures and modern times is introduced to the student. Not 
open to art majors. Mr. Downs 

43. BEGINNING ART Credit, Three Hours 

A course in the fTindamentals of art for others than art majors. Con- 
sideration of the elements and principles of design and their application in 
problems involving various art media. Mrs. Jeffries 

47, 48 BEGINNING PAINTING Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite : Art 1, 2 or by special permission. 

A studio course in creative painting in various media including casein, 
watercolor, and oil. Mrs. Jeffries 

53, 54. ADVANCED PAINTING Credit, Three or Sis Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite : Art 47, 48. 

Mrs. Jeffries 

57S. ELEMENTARY SCULPTURE Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

An introductory course in modeling and construction of three-dimensional 
subjects. Emphasis is placed upon the creative phase of sculpturing and 
upon technical process and techniques. Mr. Downs 

59. HISTORY OF ANCIENT ART Credit, Three Hours 
A survey of the significant art of the East and West from prehistoric 

times to the Renaissance. Mr. Downs 

60. HISTORY OF MODERN ART Credit, Three Hours 
A survey of the principal trends of sculpture, painting and architecture 

from the Renaissance of the present. Mr. Downs 

62. INTERIOR DECORATION Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
A course to familiarize the student with historical and contemporary 
home furnishing and decoration. Studio problems and interior design. 

Mrs. Bond 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 

66. COJIMERCIAL ART Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite : Art 1, 2. 
A course for the studynt interested in the nature and application of art 
materials for the commercial art field. Illustration, fashion drawinc, window 
display, and advertising art are among the projects covered. Mr. Downs 

Ed. 86A. METHODS IN THE TEACHING OF ART Credit, Three Hours 
Two lectures and four studio hours a weeli. 
Section a. For Elementary Education Majors 

Prerequisite : Art 1, Art 43, or permission of the department 
Section b. For Art Majors 

Prerequisite : 12 hours of Art. 

A Btndy of the aims of art in the school and its place in the Integral 

program ; practice in art problems for the classroom teacher, together with 

the selection and preparation of illustrative material to meet the needs of 

pupils of different grade levels. Mrs. Jeffries 

91. STUDIO PROBLEMS Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to permit advanced practice and research by art 
majors in their fields of siiecial interest. Painting, sculpture, design. Interior 
decoration, or materials and methods of teaching art are suggested fields 
of study. These courses must be scheduled by special arrangement with 
the department head. Mrs. Jeffries 

98. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

A study and review group meeting with tlie staff to consider current 

problems, advanced techniques, and other probleins related to art. 

Required of all art majors in their senior year. Preparation for the 

exhibition required of all senior majors is made in this class. 

Mrs. Jeffries 



BIOLOGY 

John A. Yarbrough, Professor 

James H. Eads, Assistant Professor 

Helen P. Kelman, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major: twenty-four semester hours, Incl\iding 1-2, 21, 
and 51. Ed. S5 Sc. does not count toward the major. 

1-2. GENERAL BIOLOGY Credit, Six Hours 

Biology 1 Is required of majors in home economics. Elective for 

others. Two lectures, one conference and two laboratory hours n 

week. 

A course presenting the most Important biological facts and prlnrlples, 

and so n biting them that the sturlcnt ciin apply them to the ordinary affairs 

of life. A study of protoplnsm, the cell, the role of green plants. Including 

simple oxperimonts in plant physiology, the adjustment of organisms to their 

environment, and the structure and functions of vertebrates with special 

reference to man constitutes the work of the first semester. During the 

second semester a study of typical animal and plant forms Is made as an 

introdnction to these two kingdoms. Staff 



44 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

21. GENERAL BOTANY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1-2. Two lectures and six laboratory or 
tield-trip hours a weok. 
A study of the morphological and physiological aspects of the seed plants 
followed by a survey of the major groups of the plant kingdom. 

Mr. Yarbrough 

22. GENERAL ZOOLOGY Credit, Pour Hours 

Prerequisite : Biology 1-2. Two lectures and six laboratory hours 

a week. 

A phylogenetic survey of the entire animal kingdom with weighted 

emphasis on invertebrates. Both type animals and transitional forms are 

studied as to life history, morphology, phvsiology and economic importance. 

Mr. Eads 

51. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite : Biology 1-2 ; Biology 22 recommended. Two lectures 

and six laboratory hours a week. 

A course dealing with the morphology, anatomy, and development of the 

various vertebrate orjjans and systems of organs. Various vertebrate types, 

including fish, amphibia, and mammals to be dissected in the laboratory. 

Alternates with 58. Mr. Eads 

[53. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite: Biology 1-2, Chemistry 1-2. Especially adapted to 
students preparing to study medicine or nursing, or to become 
technicians. Tliree lectures and one three-hour laboratory a week. 
Anatomy to be studied only so far as it is necessary to understand the 
functions of the different systems of the body. Laboratory work to include 
study of muscles and nervous systems of other animals, and simple experi- 
ments. Mr. Eads 
Alternates with 51. 

54. HISTOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Biology 1-2 and Chemistry 1-2. Especially adapted 

to students preparing to study medicine or nursing, or to become 

technicians. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. 

The first half of the course is devoted to slide preparation, employing 

plant and animal tissues. The paraffin method is emphasized, with some 

attention to the celloidin and freezing techniques. The second half consists 

of a careful microscopic analysis of the common animal tissues. 

Alternates with 50. Mr. Yarbrough 

55. GENETICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Biology 1-2 or its equivalent. Three lectures a week. 
Designed chiefly for a thorough presentation of modern genetic principles 
and with examples from plant and animal breeding. Attempts are also 
made to apply such information in sociological and psychological considera- 
tions and in human well-being. Mr. Eads 

[56. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite : Biology 1-2. Two lectures and six laboratory hours 
a week. 
Laboratory study of maturation, fertilization, segmentation, formation of 

germ layers, origin of characteristic vertebrate organs in representative forms. 

Special emphasis placed on the chick and pig in laboratory, and outside 

readings to show comparative stages in other vertebrates. 

Alternates with 54. Mr. Eads 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 45 

[59. PLANT ANATOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : Biology 1-2 and 21. One lecture and six laboratory 

hours a week. 

A study of cellular units of seed plants, including both woody and 

herbaceous types. Mr. Yarbrough 

64. BACTERIOLOGY Credit. Three Hours 

Recommended for home economics majors. Elective for others. 

Prerequisite : Biology 1 and Chemistry 1-2 or their equivalents. 

One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. 

A general study of bacteria, yeasts, and molds, with emphasis on the 

application of the principles of bacteriology to everyday life. Laboratory 

work to include culture and staining techniques ; principles of sterilization 

and disinfection ; bacteriological examination of air, water, and milk, and 

experiments on fermentation. Mr. Yarbrough 

[66. PLANT TAXONOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequi.'^ite : Biology 1-2. One lecture and six laboratory or field- 
trip hours a week. 

A study of the external morphology, identification, classification, and dis- 
tribution of the seed plants in the vicinity. Mr. Yarbrough 
Ed. 85 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours 
See page 54. Miss Yarbrough and Mr. Yarbrough 



BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Lois Frazier, Associate Professor 

Jack W. Hickman, Assistant Professor 

Euth B. Robinson, Instructor 

The Department of Business and Economics offers a major in business 
and a major in <'eonomics. Students have a choice of counting certain 
designated courses for credit as either business or economics. 

Courses in this department are not open to freshmen. 

BUSINESS 

Rexiulrements for a major in business : 24 hours exclusive of 31-.S2. 
The followiuK courses are required: .53-54, Gl, 02, G3, 73, and 83. Business 
majors must take nine hours of economics, including 21 and 22. 

In addition to these course requirements, vach l)usiness major is expected 
to present evidence of having completed forty hours of approved, paid work 
experience. 

Credit for Business 31-32 and 53-54 is restricted to business majors. 

31-32. TYPEWRITING Credit. Six Hours 

Development of typewriting skill and Its application to business letters, 
manuscripts, tabulation problems, and office forms. A rate of 50 words a 
minute is required. (Students wlio satisfactorily pass an examination given 
by the department, includiuf; the tyi>ing at tlie rate of 40 net words a minute, 
may enroll in Business .32 without having completed Business 31.) 

Mrs. Robinson 



46 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

53-54. ELEMENTARY SHORTHAND Credit. Six Hours 

Prerequisite or parallel : Business 31-32. 

Principles of Gresg Sliorthand; development of skill to take dictation 

at 80 words a minute for five minutes on new material and produce acceptable 

transcripts. Mrs. Robinson 

61, 62. ACCOUNTING Credit, Six Hours 

Accounting for simple proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; 

classification of accounts; analysis of financial statements; payroll and tax 

problems. Miss Frazler 

63. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION AND REPORTS Credit, Three Hours 

Effective written and oral communication in business; composition of 

adjustment, credit, collection, and sales letters ; preparation of business 

reports. Miss Frazler 

73, 74. ADVANCED SHORTHAND Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Business 53-54 or the equivalent. 
Review of shorthand theory, further development of dictation and tran- 
scription skill; special attention to mailable transcripts. Mrs. Robinson 

75, 76. PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the history, policies, and methods of retail distribution; 

organization; store operation; control practices; personnel management; 

merchandising ; advertising ; and sales promotion. Miss Frazier 

77. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite : Mathematics 1. 
Fundamentals of statistics ; sources, collection, analysis, and Interpreta- 
tion of data ; and the use of statistical techniques. Mr. Hickman 

81. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to legal principles applied to contracts, negotiable 
instruments, bailments, sales, property, insurance, torts, and bankruptcy. 

Miss Frazler 

83, 84. OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND PRACTICE Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite : Business 31-32. 
Principles of management applied to offices. Emphasis on office Organi- 
zation ; personnel relations ; selection and proper use of office supplies and 
equipment ; methods of filing ; operation of transcribing machines, duplicating 
machines, adding machines, and calculators. Miss Frazier 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

Ed. 86 B. THE TEACHING OF BUSINESS. Credit, Three Honrs 

See page 53. Miss Frazier 

92. WORK EXPERIENCE. Credit, Three Hours 

Supervised experience in business offices two or three afternoons weekly. 

Conferences and remedial program for correction of deficiencies. For senior 

majors in business. Miss Frazler 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 47 

ECONOMICS 

Requirements for a major in economics : 2-1 hours in economics, including 
21 and 22. Economic 21 Is a prerequisite to all other courses in economics. 

21 and 21S.. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the principles underlying the current American economic 
system, including organization for production, money and banking, business 
cycles and individual prices, international trade, and distribution of income, 
with macro emphasis. Mr. Hickman 

22. PRINCIPLES OP ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

A continuation of 21, with micro emphasis to include an examination 
of the market, prices, costs, the production process, various forms of competi- 
tion in the theory of the firm, with detailed analysis of the factors of 
production. Mr. Hickman 

55. ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the management of personal and family finances, consumer 

buying practices, tax problems, purchasing guides and protections, and 

selling techniques. Mr. Hickman 

65. LABOR ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Economics 22. 
An analysis of American labor In a changing economic and social order ; 
special emphasis upon trends in employment, labor organization, and standards 
in relation to technological change, state and federal labor legislation. 

Mr. Hickman 

66. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the development of international economic policies ; geographic, 

economic, social, and political factors underlying contemporary International 
problems; foreifoi exchange and money flows; ecoiioiuic competition; and 
the economic and political methods employed by the leading commercial 
nations. (OCfered odd-numbered years only.) Mr. Hickman 

68. PUBLIC FINANCE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Economics 22 
A study of the sources of revenue and the principles and methods of 
taxation and financial administration; fiscal policy; debt management; 
and the principles governing expenditures. (Offered even-numbered years 
only.) Mr. Hickman 

76. PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit, Three Hours 

(See Business 76) 

77. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 
(See Business 77) 

81. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

(See Business 81) 



48 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

85. MONET AND BANKING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Economics 22 

An examination of the value and purchasing power of money ; the role of 
commercial banks ; the central banking system and its monetary controls ; 
and the relationship between prices, production, employmeait, and economic 
growth. Special attention paid to current problems. Mr. Hickman 

88. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the progress of worldly philosophy and cultural capitalist 
theory toward its modern role as a major factor in the provision for and 
guidance of our materialistic satisfactions, and as an institutional background 
and environmejit for the Christian ideal. Mr. Hickman 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough, Professor 

Helen Jo Collins, Assistant Professor 

Requirements for a major in Chemistry : twenty-four semester hours 
from courses in Chemistry exclusive of 1-2 and Ed. 85 Sc. or 86 Sc. 



CHEMISTRY 

1-2. GENERAL CHEMISTRY Credit, Six Hours 

An introductory course in chemistry including qualitative analysis. 
Two class hours and three laboratory hours a week. StafE 

21, 22. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four or Eight Hours 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 3-4. Three class hours and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 

51-52. QUANITATIVE ANALYSIS Credit, Eight Hours 

I'rerequisite : Chemistry 1-2. Two class hours and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Mrs. dollins 

54. BIOCHEMISTRY Credit. Four Hours 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 21. Three class hours and one tliree-hour 
laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 

[56. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 21, 22. Three class hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 

Ed. 85 Sc. or 86 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours 
See page 54. Miss Yarbrough 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 49 

91. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Chemiatry 51-52. Two class hours and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Mrs. Colllna 

[94. PHTSICAl, CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 21, 22 ; Chemistry 51, 52 ; Physics 21-22. 
A separate section will be arranged for students who have com- 
pleted in addition Mathematics 51, 52. Two class hours and two 
three-hour laboratory i)erlod8 a week. Mrs. Collins 

98. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

Open only to majors in Chemistry. 



PHYSICS 

[21-22. GENERAL PHYSICS Credit, Eight Hours] 

Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Miss YarbroQgh 

54. HOUSEHOLD PHYSICS Credit, Three Hours 

Two class hours and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Miss Yarbrough 



EDUCATION 

David E. Reveley, Professor 

Harry K. Dorsett, Associate Professor 

Lila Bell, Assistant Professor 

All of the courses listed herein are designed primarily to prepare students 
who wish to teach In the public schools of the State. Students Intending to 
teach should confer with the I>epartment of Education In their freshman or 
sophomore year and so plan their program of work as to be sure that they 
win meet the requirements for the State Class A certificate. All teaching 
programs must be approved by the head of the Department of Education. 



MAJORS IN EDUCATION 

Students pursuing the program of studies leading to the A-grnde certifi- 
cate on either the primary or grammar grade level will make education 
their major with a minimum of 22 semester hours. The State rc(iuiros that 
a teacher shall have a minimum of six semester hours from each of three 
fields: 1-The Child; 2-The School; .1-Practlcum. In addition to those courBt^ 
all majors In elementary education must take such additional e<lncatlonsl 
and subject-matter courses as may be necoMary to meet the requirements 
for a Class A certificate In North Carolina. 



50 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



NORTH CAROLINA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 
/. Subject-Mutter Courses 

Children's Literaturel 2 semester hours 

American History 6 semester hours 

Geography 6 semester hours 

Political Science 2-3 semester hours 

Art 6 semester hours 

Music 6 semester hours 

Health Education 1-2 2 semester hours 

Health Education Methods2 2 semester hours 

Physical Education Methods 2 semester hours 

//. Professional Courses 
Area I— The Pupil 

Education 31 and 53 6 semester hours 

Area II— The School 

Education 57 and choice of 65, 91, 92 6 semester hoars 

Area III — Teaching and Practicum 

Education 07 (4 lirs.) 

and '.)5 or 9r»S. (6 hrs. ) 10 semester hours 

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE FOR A.B. DEGREE 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR 
Freshman Year 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

History 1 3 History 2 3 

S-cience or Math. 3 Science or Math. 3 

ReliKion 1 3 Religion 2 3 

Health Education 1 Health Education 1 

Physical Education I'liysical Education 

16 Hours 16 Hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 21 3 English 22 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign I.angufige 3 

Science or Math. 3 Science or Math. 3 

Geotrrapliy 21 3 Geography 2J 3 

SPolitical Science 21 3 Educition .•',] 3 

Physical Education I'liysical Education 

15 Hours 15 flours 
Junior Year Z 

Education 53 3 ICdncntion .'i" 3 

Health Education 85 2 Related Department 

4Music Fundamentals 33 3 or Klective 3 

Art 4:{ 3 Plivsicnl IMncntinn 86 2 

History 21 3 Music IMiicMtioii \\\ 3 

I'liysical Education Art Education 86 3 

Related Department History 22 3 

or Elective 3 — 

— 17 Hours 

17 Hours 

'The State Department of Public In.itructlon counts Ctilldren's Literature as 

EnRlish. not as education. It may not be counted as part of the major in education. 

Speecli is strongly recommended a^ part of the pn-Rram for teaching. 
'The Stale riepnrtment of Public Instruction recommend.^^ that Biology 1-2 be taken 

as a prerequisite. 
• Poiliical Science 22 may be substituted in the spring. 
' SuHleiiis who completed Mu.-<ic Tiieury 1-2 should substitute Ed. 85 and Ed. 86 

Music. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

Senior Tear 

Related Department Education 92 3 

or Electives 12-15 Education 67 4 

Education 42 2 

12-15 Education OSS 6 

15 Hours 

Teaching mnv he scheduled for either semester of the senior year. 
TOTAL HOl'RS - 123-126 

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

Students who expect to secure State Class A certificates to tench in high 
school, must meet the re(|uirenients listed below. It is recommended that 
students be alile to teach at least two subjects in the hish school. Majors, 
related subjcdx. mid clcitives may be i/.tcrf to this end, hut it should he noted 
that the reqiili cincnts for state certificates and the colli gc requirements for 
majors do not iilinn/s coincide. All teaching programs must be npiiroved b7 
the head of the Department of Education by the beginning of the junlo^ 
year. 

/. Subject-Matter Courses 
A major and related courses should be selected from the following fields 
(the number of semester hours re(piirod for a certificate is indicated in 
parenthesis) : 

Art (."^O). Rible (21), commerce (.".O, English (30), French (2-4)1, German 
(24)1, history (social studies — 30), hume economics (including certain 
sciences and otlier related courses) — (51), mathematics (21), public school 
music (iiulniling six semester hours in voice) — (30), science (30), sociology; 
social studies (.'!()), Siianish (2-l)i. 

The foUiiwing combinatiims are suggested: English-Lntin, English -French- 
German, or Spatiish, i;nglish-religi(in. history-mathematics, history-French- 
German, or Spanish, science-mathematics. 

//. Professional Courses 

Area I— The Pupil 

IMucation 31 and 50 C semester hours 

Area II— The School 

Educatioij 52 and choice of 05, 91, 92 6 semester hours 

Area III — TeachlMg and Practlcum 

Education .S5 or SO, and 95 or 9oS 9 semester hours 

Note: Students are advised to take these courses In the following 
order: Education 31, 52, ,S5 or 80, 90. 



'The hours refiulrcd In nny forelprn langunKe are based upon two unltB of high Bchool 
work In that lan^uace. 



52 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

EDUCATION COURSES 

Eiducation 31 Is prerequisite to all Education courses exeept 42 and 53. 
31, 31S. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

A course Intended to be basic to the others In the various sequences 
which give direction to the profeeslonally trained teacher. Mr. Reveley 

42F or 42. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

An intensive study of children's literature; the principles underlying the 

evaluation, organization and teaching of literary materiaL Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

52F or 52. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 57. 
The historical development, and a consideration of the place and function 
of secondary education in our democracy; the organization and administra- 
tion of the high school curriculum ; methods of planning and teaching ; 
qualifications of the high school teacher; student guidance; records and 
reports. Mr. Dorsett 

Prerequisite to student teaching on the high school level. 

53 or 53S. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 

Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite Ed. 31 or Psychology 21. 

A survey of the psychological development of the Individual through 
childhood. Mr. Dorsett 

56F, 56. TESTING AND GUIDANCE Credit, Three Hours 

A consideration of child and adolescent Intelligence, aptitude, achieve- 
ment, interest and personality tests used in the public schools, together with 
elementary statistical techniques involved in their application. 

Mr. Dorsett 
[BLOCK COURSE] 

57, 57S. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 52. 
The historical development of the elementary school; qualifications of 
the elementary teacher; the curriculum and co-curricnlar activities; organi- 
zation and control ; relation of teachers and pupUs to one another ; records 
and reports. Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

G5. FOUTSHDATIONS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 

The movements of educational thought and Institutions which gave rise 

to the American school systems. Mr. Beveley 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

C7, 67S. ELEMENTARY METHODS Credit, Four Hours 

A study of materials and methods of teaching In all subjects at the 

elementary school leveL Directed observation ; units of work developed and 

evaluated. Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 53 

91. SOOIAl, PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 

Present-day confusion In education due to conflicting philosophies as to 
alms and objectives, curriculum content, methods of learning and teaching, 
and the range of formal education. The responsibility of the school in rela- 
tion to guidance, vocational interests, moral and character education, family 
Ufe, and religion. Mr. Reveley 

92. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the philosophical bases of modem education, with particular 

reference to the philosophies of idealism, realism, and pragmatism. 

Mr. Reveley 

[BLOCK COURSE] 



SPECIAL METHODS COURSES 

Three semester hours of special methods in the field in which one is 
planning to teach are expected for a high school certificate; six semester 
hours may be taken by those who wish a certificate to teach in two fields. 
In special methods courses students are introduced to alms, objectives, 
materials, and techniques of the teaching fields and levels of the State 
Course of Study. Lesson planning, practical demonstration, and actual 
observation of teaching of the various phases of the programs In the Raleigh 
City Schools and Wake County constitute a part of the courses. 

Prerequisite to all special methods courses : Education 31. 

86A. ART EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 

(For description, see page 43) Mrs. Jeffries 

86B. THE TEACHING OF BUSINESS Credit, Throe Hours 

Miss Frazier 

86E. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Rose 

86 M.L. THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Credit, Three Hours 
Mr. McAllister 

82, 85 H. Ed. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH EDUCATION 

Credit, Tn-o Hours 
Mrs. Snyder 

86. H. EC. THE TEACHING OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Hanyen 

85M. THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Canaday 

85, 80 Mus. THE TEACHING OF MUSIC Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 2. Retiulred of Juniors majoring in I*ubUc 
School Music. (For description see page 71) Miss Ilaeseler 

86 P. Ed. THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Credit, Two Hours 
Mrs. Miissey 



54 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

85 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Yarbrough 

86 S. St. THE TEACHING OF HISTORY AND SOCIAL STUDIES 

Credit, Three Hours 

Open to juniors and seniors taking a major in history or sociology. 

Miss Lemmon 

OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING 

95, 95S. STUDENT TEACHING Credit, Six Hours (either semester) 

The purpose of this course is to give the student actual teaching ex- 
perience. All student-teaching is on the block. Student-teachers will take 
advanced courses in education for the first nine weeks of the semester; 
during the last eight weeks they will be in the classroom for the entire 
day. The student will not take courses other than her courses in education 
during her semester of student-teaching. All high school student-teachers 
must have taken Education 31, Education 52, and Education 85 before the 
semester in which they do their student-teaching. All elementary student- 
teachers must have taken Education 31, Education 57, and Education 53 
before the semester in which they do their student-teaching. The Depart- 
ment reserves the right to withhold the privilege of student-teaching if 
circumstances warrant. Staff 

(Fee $35) 

ENGLISH 

Mary Lyncli Johnson, Professor 

l^orma Rose, Professor 

lone Kemp KJniglit, Associate Professor 

Velma Mae Gorsage, Instructor 

Dorothy Pope Greenwood, Instructor 

Margaret C. Martin, Instructor 

Elizabeth S. Chamberlain, Part-time Instructor 

English 1-2 prerequisite for English 21-22 ; English 21-22 prerequisite 
for fill other courses in English, except 33, 58 and Speech 21, 26. 

Requirements for a major : Twelve hours in English from courses 51, 52, 
53, 51, 55, 04, OS ; and six additional hours from English courses numbered 
above 50. No credit in the Department of English given for Education 85 B. 

1-2; IS. PRINCIPLES OF WRITING Credit, Six Hoursl 

Staff 

21-22. DEVELOPMENT OP ENGLISH LITERATURE Credit, Six Hours 

Miss Johnson, Miss Rose, Miss Knight, Mrs. Greenwood 

33. CREATIVE WRITING Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Greenwood 

51. OLD ENGLISH Credit, Tliree Hours 

Miss Johnson 



> During the fall semester one section will meet five times a week with three hours 
credit, to take care of the needs of students deficient In fundamentals. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 55 

62. CHAUCER Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: English 51. Miss Johnson 

53, 54. SHAKESPEARE Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Miss Rose 

55. MILTON Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Johnson 

57. AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 

CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Peacock 

58. ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Knight 

62. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Johnson 

[64. POETRY OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

Mrs. Greenwood 

65. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Knight 

68. ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 

CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Rose 

70. PROSE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Greenwood 

Ed. 85 E. THE TEACHING OP ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

(See page S."?) Miss Rose 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

94. THE TREATMENT OF LITERARY PROBLEMS Credit, One Hour 
Open only to majors in English. Miss Rose 

98. SEMINAR Credit, Three Hours 

Open only to majors in English. Miss Johnson 



SPEECH 

21. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Corsage 

26. ORAL INTERPRETATION Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Gorsnge 

[61. RELIGIOUS DRAMA Credit, Three Hours) 

Miss Gorsnge 

62. PLAY PRODUCTION Credit, Tliree Hours 

Miss Gorsnge 



56 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Quentin Oliver McAllister, Professor 

Susanne H. Freund, Associate Professor 

Lucy Ann Neblett, Assistant Professor 

William R. Ledford, Instructor 

^Margaret C. Martin, Instructor 

^P. A. Cline, Jr., Instructor 

ConrBes numbered 1-2 and 21-22, or their equivalent, are prerequisite for 
any course of higher number. 

Requirements for a major in French or Spanish: Twenty-four hours, of 
which eighteen must be above 21-22, Including 51-52 and 57. Foreign lan- 
guage majors are urged to include a second foreign language as a related field. 

Under the present certification requirement of six hours of spoken lan- 
guage, students who plan to teach French or Spanish must take the cooraea 
numbered 57 and 58 in the language to be taught. Ed. 86 M. L. is required of 
those planning to teach a foreign language, and counts as Education. 

FRENCH 
1-2. ELEMENTARY FRENCH Credit, Six Hoars 

Introduction to the French language through analysis, contact, and use. 
Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

21-22. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Credit, Six Hours 

Review of French grammar; Introduction of more difficult aspects of the 

language ; readings of appropriate difficulty ; practice In the oral and aural 

skills. Staff 

51-62. FRENCH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 
A survey of the development of French literature and the main currents 
of French thought from the beginnings to the contemporary period. 

Mr. McAllister 

[63. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

A literary study of the representatives of French classicism in religious 

thought, philosophy, and drama, with some reference to their importance 

In the development of continental European civilization. Mrs. Freund 

[64. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

The period of the decline of absolutism, the rise of the bourgeoisie, and 

the development of the rational spirit as shown In the literature of eighteenth^ 

century France. Mrs. Freund 

[55. FRENCH ROMANTICISM Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAlliater 

[56. FRENCH REALISM AND NATURALISM Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAllister 

67. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors In French. Sophomores admitted by permission only. 

Mr. McAllister 

> First Semester 
• Second Semester 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 57 

88. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Sophomores admitted by permission only. Mr. McAllister 

61. MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE, 18S0-1919 Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

62. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE, 

1919 TO THE PRESENT Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

98. DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURE OF THE 

FRENCH LANGUAGE Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the historical derelopment of French from Ijatin. Reading of 
works In Old French. Some introduction, through French, to the general 
field of linguistics and the philosophy of grammar. 

Offered only when the demand is sufficient. Mr. McAllister 



GERMAN 

1-2. ELEMENTARY GERMAN Credit, Six Houra 

Introduction to the German language through analysis, contact, and use. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Mrs. Freund 

21-22. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Credit, Six Hours 

Review of German grammar : introduction of more difficult aspects of the 

language ; readings of appropriate difficulty ; practice in the oral and aural 

•kills. 

German 58 may be substituted for German 22. Mrs. Freund 

(61-02. GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours] 

A study of the development of German Literature from the beginning* 
to the contemporary period. Exton.slve and Intensive reading of significant 
works. Lectures and reports in German. 

Offered only when the demand is sufficient. Mrs. Freund 

63, 54. FAUST; LYRIC POETRY OF THE 

lOTII CENTURY Credit, One Hour Each Semester 

Mrs. Freund 

68. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN Credit, Three Hours 

Designed to meet the needs of students who are Interested esi>eclally in 

■clentlflc work. Offered only upon demand. Mrs. Freund 



GREEK* 

[21-22. ELEMENTARY GREEK Credit, Six Hours] 

[51-52. IinMKRS ILIAD; PLATO'S APOLOGY; NEW 

TESTAMENT Credit, Six Hours] 

Prerequisite: Greek 21-22. 



*Ofrared only upon BUfTlcUnt damnnd. 



58 JtEREDITH COLLEGE 

LATIN 

1-2. ELEMENTARY LATIN Credit, Six Hours 

A course for beginners entailing the fundamentals of the language. Open 
to students who offer less than two units for entrance. Mr. Cline 

21-22. VERGIL'S AENEID Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Two units of Latin for entrance or Latin 1-2. 

An intermediate course in Latin designed to prepare the student for work 
with the more difficult authors. Primary considerations will be translation 
of the Aeneid and applied grammar and syntax. Mr. Cline 

51-52. A SURVEY OF ROMAN LITERATURE WITH EMPHASIS 

UPON REPRESENTATIVE WRITERS Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Four units of Latin for entrance or Latin 21-22. 

A survey of Latin Literature as a whole. Translation of the prose of 
Livy and Pliny, the poetry of Horace, with special emphasis upon applied 
grammar and syntax. Mr. CUne 

61. ROMAN COMEDY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Latin 21-22. 
Translation of the plays of Plautus and Terence. 

62. LATIN PROSE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Latin 51. 
Translation of selections from Cicero, Suetonius, Tacitus. 

SPANISH 

1-2. ELEMENTARY SPANISH Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the Spanish language through analysis, contact, and use. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

21-22. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Credit. Six Hours 

Review of Spanish grammar; introduction of more difficult aspects of 

the language; readings of appropriate difficulty; practice in the oral and aural 

skills. Staff 

[51-52. SPANISH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours] 
A study of the more important works of Spanish literature, particularly 

as they reflect Spanish life and culture. 

Alternates with Spanish 53-54. Miss Neblett 

53-54. SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of representative works of Spanish-American literature, particu- 
larly as they reflect the history and civilization of the nations concerned. 

Alternates with Spanish 51-52. Mr. Ledford 

57. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors in Spanish. Sophomores admitted by permission only. 

Miss Neblett 

58. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 
Sophomores admitted by permission only. Miss Neblett 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 59 

92. MODERN SPANISH DRAMA Credit, Three Hours 

The modern Spanish theatre, beginning with L. F. de Moratin. Open to 

seniors, and to others by special permission. 

Alternates with Spanish 94. Miss Neblett 

[94. MODERN SPANISH NOVEL Credit, Three Hours] 

The modern Spanish novel, beginning with Feman Caballero. Open to 

seniors, and to others by special permission. 

Alternates with Spanish 92. Miss Neblett 

Ed. 80 M. L. THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 

(See page 53.) Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Jay D. Massey, Assistant Professor 

Helena "W. Allen, Instructor 

Mary Mackay Edwards, Assistant in Equitation 

Julia M. Snyder, Part-time Instructor 

Frances "W. Stevens, Part-time Instructor 

The program of the Department of Health and Physical Education Is 
deeigned to meet the needs of each Individual student with respect to such 
problems as : 

1. The development and maintenance of a high degree of physical 
efficiency through a varied program of sports, rhythmic activities, and 
restricted physical education. 

2. The development of fundamental skills In those activities which will 
contribute to an Intelligent use of leisure time. 

3. The provision of adequate opportunities for the development of quali- 
ties of leadership and cooperation through participation in the Intramural 
Program. 

4. The development of intelligent understanding of and a positive atti- 
tude toward personal health and hygiene in relation to daily living. 

All studont.s enrolled in health and physical education arc requirpd to 
undergo iihysical oxaminatious. Upon tlie ba.sis of these examinations the 
CJolIege pliysician classifies each student for a physical education class 
in vigorous activity, .semi-vigorous activity, or restricted physical education. 
During (iriontation weelc all frcslimen are Introduced to the facilities of 
the student liealtli service by the College physician. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

1-2. PERSONAL HYGIENE Credit, Two Hoars 

One hour a week for tlio year. Required of freshmen. 

.\ fiindaniontal course In tlie principles and problems of i>orsonaI hygiene. 
The course Includes discussions based ui><>ii student liealth problems and 
Interests, and instruction based upon liealth problems of college students. 



60 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Kd. 82 H. Ed. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF HEALTH 
EDUCATION FOR THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL Credit, Three Houtb 

See page 52. 

Ed. 85 H. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS OP HEALTH 
EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM 
TEACHER Credit, Two Hours 

Designed to furnish prospective elementary teachers with information 
and ideas to be of help In planning, carrying out and evaluating classroom 
health Instruction. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Students enrolled in activity courses In physical education are required 
to have regulation gymnasium costumes for class. All freshmen and transfer 
students must purchase their uniforms during the first week of school from 
the Meredith Supply Store. 

All freshmen will take Freshman Fundamentals during their first se- 
mester In college. Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, 51 and 52 offer the other students 
a wide selection of physical education activities. All students classified for 
vigorous activity may select from the courses listed below. It is recommended 
that a student continue an activity for two semesters In order to further 
improve her skill for future enjoyment of the activity. 

I. FRESHMAN FUNDAMENTALS 

II, 12. TEAM SPORTS: Beginning and Advanced Courses. 

Two hours a week for each semester. 
Basketball 
Softball 
Speedball 
Volleyball 

21, 22. RHYTHMIC ACTIVITIES: Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced 
Courses. 

Two hours a week for each semester. ^ 

Modern Dance 
Folk and Square Dance 

23, 24. RESTRICTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Students classified for posture or restricted physical education upon the 
recommendation of tlie College piiysician are enrolled in these courses. 
Each course is adapted to the needs of the individual student. In casea 
where student choices can be allowed, final selection will follow a conference 
with the head of the department. These activities are also open to students 
who are not on a restricted program. 

Archery Recreational Sports Sllmnastlce 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

51, 62. INDIVIDUAL SPORTS: Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced 
Courses. 
Two hours a week for each semester. 

Archery Golfi 

Badminton Life Saving2 

Bowlings Instructor's Course2 

Eqnitationi Roller Skating 

Tennis 

82. COMMUNITX RECREATION AND CAMP LEADERSHIP 

Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the concept and theory of recreation and camping ; present-day 

trends in the light of their historical backgrounds ; the organization of 

recreation centers, public and private camps ; principles and methods of 

planning, conducting, and evaluating these two programs. 

83, 84. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION FOR THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Six Hours 

A survey of the history and principles of physical education as related 

to a good program of physical education for the secondary school. A study 

of the activities as they relate to the needs of this age group, with experience 

In lesson planning and assisting with college classes. 

Ed. 86 P. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM TEACHER 

Credit, Two Hours 

Designed to help prospective elementary teachers to see and understand 

the place of physical education In the total educational system. Opportunities 

given for lesson planning and teaching the different types of activities for the 

various grade levels In elementary school. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Lillian Parker Wallace, Professor 

Alice Barnwell Keith, Professor 

Sarah McCulloh Lemmon, Associate Professor 

Richard D. Goff, Instructor 

Vernon 0. Stumpf, Instructor 

History 1-2 Is a prerequisite for all other courses In history. 

Requirements for a major: History 1-2 (prerequisite) ; eighteen to twenty- 
four semester hours in history including History 21, 22. History 61, 62 alter- 
nate with 5.3, 54. 

History 02 Is given In alternate years. 

Ed. 86 S. St. counts as Education. 



• Special F««, Paid at the time of refflatratlon for the cl««s. 
■ Special Fee. Paid br Indlvlduala at oIT-campua facllltr. 



62 MEREDITH COLLEGE 



HISTORY 

1-2. HISTORICAL BxVCKGROUNDS OF MODERN 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

Open to all freshmen. Rerjuii-ed of freshmen who have not had at least 
two years of history in high school, one of which was World or European 
history. Staff 

Prerequisite to all other courses in history. 

21, 22. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES Credit, Six Hours 

A Survey Course Miss Lemmon, Mr. Stumpf 

[51. ANCIENT HISTORY Credit, Three Hours] 

Mrs. Wallace 

[52. MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours] 

Mrs. Wallace 

53. MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

15(K)-18.30 Mrs. Wallace 

64. MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

1SM-1!I14 Mrs. Wallace 

58. FAR EASTERN POLITICS AND CULTURE Credit, Two Hours 

Mrs. Wallace 

60. AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 21, 22 or Econ. 21. Mr. Goft 

61. EUROPE SINCE 1911 Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Wallace 

62. CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Credit, One Hour 

Prerequisite : History CI or 12 hours in history. Mrs. Wallace 

63. HISTORY OF TPIE AMERICAN COLONIES Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : History 21. Miss- Keith 

64. SOUTHERN HISTORY Credit, Thre6 Hours 

Miss Keith 

65. THE I'NITED STATES IN THE 

MIDDLE PERIOD Credit, Three Hours 

Piere<iuisite : History 21, 22. 
Selected social and intellectual .studies before 1S60. Miss Lemmon 

66. Ri:CEXT HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : History 21, 22. 
Selected social and intellectual studies since 1S65. Miss Lemmon 

Ed. 86 S. St THE TEACHING OP HISTORY AND 

SOCIAL STUDIES'. See page 54. Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Lemmon 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

92. SUPERVISED TRAINING IN ARCHIVEJS Credit, Three Hours 

Offers Three Options : 

Archives : Archival Science 
Archives : Museum Art 
Archives : Publications 

Open to juniors and seniors taking a major in history. 
Students will do 150 hours of work in the North Carolina Department of 
Archives and History under the joint supervision of the Director of the 
Department of Archives and History and the Department of History of 
Meredith College. Students completing this course are recognized as Junior 
Archivists by the State Department of Archives and History. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

21. GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. (Joff, Mr. Stumpf 

22. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN THE 

UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Goff 

57. AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Political Science 21 or 22. Mr. Goff 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Ellen Dozier Brewer, Professor 
Jennie M. Hanyen, Associate Professor 

Requirements for a major: Twenty-four semester hours of work In home 
economics above the freshman level. Students are iidvised to take Chemi.stry 
1-2 in the freshman year. If they are planning to ti'iiih they should also 
Include In their course Biology 1-2, Physics 54, and Sociology 74. In the 
courses prescribed for a degree they may substitute Kiology (>4 for lUology 
2, Sociology 74 for Sociology 22, and Art G2 for Art 31. 

Ed. )S6 H. E. counts as Education. 

1. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 

A study of clothing selection and apiireciation. Kleiiieiilary clothlne 

construction. An analysis of fabrics to find the relation between cost and 

quality. Miss Hanyen 

4. FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 
Food selection and preparation. Miss Rrewer 

23. FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

One lecture and five hours of laboratory. 

I'rerefjulsltc: Home Economics 4, except by permission of the 

bead of the deiiarlmerit. 
A study of the principles and processes Involved In the prepMi-alion and 
preservatUm of food. Miss Hrewer 



&i MEREDITH COLLEGE 



24. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 1. One lecture and five hours 
of laboratory. 
Advanced clothing construction. Continuation of fabric analysis. 

Miss Hanyen 

61. NUTRITION Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 23, and Chemistry 1-2. Two lec- 
tures and two hours of laboratory. Jliss Brewer 

52. ADVANCED FOODS Credit, Three Houra 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 23. Two lectures and four hours of 
laboratory. 
A course designed to apply the principles of nutrition and cookery to the 
planning, preparation, and serving of meals of Tarioua types. Miss Brewer 

53. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three HourB 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 24. One lecture and five hours of 
laboratory. 

Tailoring. Use of foundation pattern in designing. Identification and 
practical testing of materials. Miss Hanyen 

64. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 53. One lecture and five hours of 
laboratory. 
Alternates with 58. 
Applied costume designing. Problems draped on the dress form. 

Miss Hanyen 

56. CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HOME NURSING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the physical care and the development of the child from the 

pre-natal period through infancy. Principles of nursing as applied to the 

home care of the sick. Miss Hanyen 

[58. TEXTILES' AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours] 

Elective for juniors and seniors not majoring In home economics. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 

A survey of personal clothing problems to Include the basic principles of 

selection, construction, and renovation of garments; the use of commercial 

patterns, and a knowledge of textiles from the standpoint of the conismner. 

Alternates with 54. Miss Hanyen 

59, 69S. FOOD SELECTION AND PREPARATION Credit, Three Hours 
Elective for Juniors and seniors in all courses. Two lectures and 
four hours of laboratory. 
A brief course In food selection, preparation and service, planned for 

students majoring in other fields. Miss Brewer 

C2. DIET THERAPY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 51 and Chemistry 21. Two lectures 
and two hours of laboratory. 
A continuation of Home Economics 51 with emphasis on special dietary 

problems. Miss Brewer 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

&4. HOUSE PLANNING AND FURNISHING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the house plan from the standpoint of convenience and artistic 

effect. The selection of household furnishings and arrangements of Interiors 

with special emphasis on economic factors. Miss Brewer 

Ed. 86 H. Ee. METHODS OF TEACHING HOME 

ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

See page 53. Miss Hanyen 

89. HOME MANAGEMENT Credit, Three Hours 

The application of scientific principles to the problems of the modern 

homemaker. Miss Brewer 

91. ECONOMICS OF THE HOME Credit, One Hour 

Open to seniors taking a major in home economics and to juniors by 

permission. Prerequisite or parallel : Home Economics 89. Miss Hanyen 

93 or 93S. ECONOMICS OF THE HOME— RESIDENCE Credit, Two Hours 
To be taken in connection with Home Economics 91. 
Residence for students in groups of four in the home management house 
for one month. Miss Hanyen 



MATHEMATICS 

Ernest F. Canaday, Professor 

Dorothy K. Preston, Instructor 

Requirements for a major : Twenty-one semester hours above 1 and 2. 
Education 80 M. does not count on the major. 

1. COLLEGE AUiEBRA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Two units of algebra or demonstration of its equiva- 
lent. 

2. TRIGONOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

21. PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Math. 1, 2. 

22. SOLID ANALYTIC GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Math. 21. 

32. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Math. 21. 

61. INTEGRAL CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

I'rerequislte: Math. 32. 

62. ADVANCED CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Math. 51. 

[63. THEORY OF EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite: Math. 21, 22. 



66 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

56. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Matli. 51, 52. 

57. COLLEGE GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Math. 21. 

A course in modern plane geometry. 

[ED. 85M. THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours] 
See page 53. 



MUSIC 

Harry E. Cooper, Professor 

Stuart Pratt, Professor 

Beatrice Donley, Associate Professor 

Jean Swanson, Assistant Professor 

Edwin K. Blanchard, Assistant Professor 

Phyllis Weyer Garriss, Assistant Professor 

James L. Clyburn, Instructor 

IsabeUe Haeseler, Instructor 

The courses in the Department of Music fall Into several principal groups, 
namely : courses in history and appreciation designed primarily as cultural 
courses for students not specializing in music; courses in teaching methods 
designed to prepare for work as a teacher of music (in the public schools 
or as a private teacher) ; courses in theory and composition designed to 
furnish a solid background for the understanding and intepretation of the 
greatest music as well as to develop to the fullest the creative ability of 
the individual: courses in singing and playing leading to artistic performance; 
and courses leading to a major in church music. 

Students who wish to major in any branch of music must demonstrate 
to the satisfaction of the head of the department that their talent and 
previous training are such that they are qualified to carry on the wort in a 
satisfactory manner. 

Students who cannot meet all the entrance requirements of the college 
and the department may take work in applied music, but will not receive 
credit for such work. 

For Music majors applied music must be validated by equal credit (with 
C or better ) in courses selected from the following : Theory, History and 
Literature, Music Education and Ensemble, subject to quantitative restrictions 
stated elsewhere in the catalogue. 

Music majors must complete at least sixty semester hours in non-music 
subjects. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

Major in Applied Music (piano, organ, violin, or voice) for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts : 

Applied music major 24 hours 

Electives in applied music and ensemble 6 hours 

Theory 1, 2 6 hours 

Theory 21, 22 6 hours 

History of Music 63, 64 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 53, 54 4 hours 

Electives in theory 6 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Major in Music Education for the degree of Bachelor of Arts : 

Theory 1, 2 6 hours 

Theory 21, 22 6 hours 

History of Music 63, 64 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 53, 54 4 hours 

Jlcthods S5, SGI 6 hours 

Wind Instruments 05 2 hours 

String Instruments 6G 2 hours 

Conducting 97 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Piano and voice2 

Major in Church Music for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts : 

Theory 1, 2 6 hours 

Theory 21, 22 , 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 53, 54 4 hours 

History of Music 63, 64 6 hours 

Church Music 87, 88 6 hours 

Field work in Church Music !)3 3 hours 

Conducting 07 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Applied Music 24 hours 

Minimum of hours each In piano, organ, and voice 

(12 hours in one of these) 

World-Wide Christianity, Rel. 47 3 hours 

The Local Church Program, Rel. 56 3 hours 

Majors In church music, organ, public school music, violin, and voice 
must coMiplcfe I'iano 1 with a satisfactory grade. 

Majors in public school music and church music are expected to appear 
In one public recital above the level of the student recital. 

Majors in organ should elect: Counterpoint, four semester hours (junior 
year) ; and Canon niiil l''ii;;iie, two semester hours (senior year). 

A .lonlor recital and a partial junior recital is required of all majors In 
applied music. 



•Six hours toward the eertlflcato requirements (see p. SO). 

" Piano and voice must be studied unlU, In the opinion of the faculty, a renaonable 
prodclency has been reached. 



68 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 

MUSIC 

students who hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
will be granted the degree of Bachelor of Music on meeting the following 
requirements : 

1. Present a total of 45 hours in applied music, at least 36 hours of 
which must be in one major field of applied music, and give a recital which, 
In the opinion of the faculty, is worthy of the degree. 

2. Complete all theory courses in the foUowtng list which have not 
already been completed : 

Theoiy 1, 2 C hours 

Theory 21, 22 6 hours 

Music history 63, 64 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 53, 54 4 hours 

Counterpoint 51, 52 4 hours 

Canon and Fugue 08 2 hours 

Composition Ul 3 hours 

Development of Symphony 101 , 2 hours 

Orchestration £W 2 hours 

Conducting 97 2 hours 

Survey of Chamber Music 102 2 hours 

Students may elect additional courses in any department if time permits, 
but will not be required to carry more hours than necessary to meet these 
minimum requirements. 



EQUIPMENT 

Six giand pianos, tv/enty-one upright pianos, a three-manual organ, two 
two-manual organs and numerous orchestral instruments furnish thorough 
equipment for effective teaching. 

STUDENT RECITALS 

student recitals are held bi-weekly, at which all music students are 
required to be present, and in which they are required to take part when 
requested to do so by their teachers. 

Freshmen and sophomores majoring in piano, organ, voice, or violin will 
appear in recital at least once each semester, except that freshmen may 
be excused the first semester. Juniors wiU be heard at least twice each 
semester, and seniors at the discretion of their major professors. 



CONCERTS 

The College appropriates funds to provide opportunities for the students 
to hear good music. The Raleigh Concert Music Association brings a number 
of orchestras and artists to Raleigh each season. Concerts given by the 
Raleigh Oratorio Society, the Chamber Music Guild and other local organiza- 
tions are also open to students. Members of the faculty of the Department 
of Music are active as recitalists, and the faculty concerts given throughout 
the year include works from all schools of composition. 



COUESES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

THEORY 

1, 2. THEORT Credit, Thrw Hours 

Prerequisite : Theory 1 before 2 Each Semester 

Required of freshmen majoring in music 

Elementary harmony with special emphasis on primary and secondary 
triads and Dominant Seventh chords. Correlative studies in sightsinging, 
dictation, lieyboard harmony, and harmonic analysis. 

Miss Swanson 

21, 22. THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 2 before 21 and Each Seme.ster 

21 before 22. 
Required of sophomores majoring in music. 

A continuation of Theory 1, 2. Review of harmonic practice followed by 
a study of modulations, seventh chords, chromatic alterations as exemplified 
In the works of the major Baroque, classic and romantic composers. 

Miss Swanson 

33. MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS Credit, Three Hours 

This course is intended for the student majoring in Primary Education. 
The student will study pitch, scales, keys, and key signatures, rhythm and 
time signatures, rhythmic reading and elejnontary chords and their functions. 
There will be included melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation, and basic 
keyboard harmony. Not open to students who have completed Theory 1, 2. 

[BLOCK COURSE] Mr. Blanchard 

51, 52. COUNTERPOINT Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite : Theory 22 before 51 and Each Semester 

51 before 52. 

Required of juniors majoring in organ. 

Strict counterpoint in all five species and a study of the medieval modes. 

Mrs. Garriss 

63, 54. FORM AND ANALYSIS Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 22 before 53 and Each Seuie-ster 

53 before M. 

Required of juniors majoring in music. 

An explanation of design and structure in all types of homnphonlc 
music. Th<' phrase, period, song-forms carried through to the sonata. 

Mr. Cooper 

91. COMPOSITION Credit, Tliree Hours 

Preretiuisltes: Counterpoint 52, Form 
and Analysis 54. 

Composition in various forms for voice, chorus, individual instruments, 
and combinations of instruments, foIIowe<l largely by the inclination of the 
studejit. 

Mrs. Garriss 

94. ORCHESTRATION Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisites : Theory 22, Counterpoint 62. 

A study of the instruments of (he orchestra. Arrnnglng music for various 
groups of InstnimcntM ami for full (irclic^itrns. 

Mrs. Gnrrisa 



70 MEREDITH COIiLEGE 

98. CANON AND FUGUE Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite : Counterpoint 52. 
Required of seniors majoring in organ. 

A course toucliing upon all the complex devices of involved polyplionic 
music. Double, triple, and quadruple counterpoint. 

Mr. Cooper 



HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

26. APPRECIATION OP MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

A course adapted to the needs of the general college student who wishes 
to obtain an understanding of music as an element of liberal culture and to 
develop the power of listening Intelligently. No technical knowledge required. 
Not open to music majors. 

Mrs. Garriss 
Mr. Blanchard 

63, 64. THE HISTORY OF MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisites : English 2, History 2, and Each Semester 

Music Theory 2. 

Required of students majoring in music. 

The development of musical art from ancient times to the present. 
The study of music as literature, through the analysis of masterworks. 

[BLOCK COURSE] Mrs. Garriss 

87,88. CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 1, 2. Each Semester 

A course dealing with all phases of music in the Protestant church. 
Organization and administration of adult and children's choirs, with ex- 
tensive survey of anthejns and other materials. Study of hymns and their 
use, and consideration of the ministry of music as an aid to worship. 

Mr. Cooper and Staff 

101. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYMPHONY Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite : Music History 64 or 
Music Appreciation 26. 

The history of the symphony, with a detailed study of several works 
and sufficient hearing of about a dozen outstanding worlvs so that the student 
becomes familiar with them. The styles of different composers and the 
development of orchestration emphasized. The writing of a research paper 
of small thesis proportions based primarily on the study of scores and 
recordings used in the course. 

Mrs. Garriss 

102. SURVEY OF CHAMBER MUSIC LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite : Music History G4 or 

Music Appreciation 26. 

Tlie history of chamber music emphasizing the forms and styles of 
various periods and composers. Student-faculty performances of chamber 
works whenever po.ssible. Score-study and recordings of about til'lcen out- 
standing chamber works so that the student becomes very familiar with them. 

Mrs. Garriss 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

34. GRADED MATERIALS AND METHODS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Music Fundamentals 33 or 

permission of the department. 

Tliis course is recommended for all prospective teachers at the elementary 
level, especially those preparing to teach in North Carolina. Designed to 
lead the primary education major toward an understanding of the presenta- 
tion of singing, rhythmic, instrumental, listening, and creative activities to 
the child in grades one through six, the course is presented through a 
sequence of related activities. Not open to students who have completed Ed. 
85 Mus. 

[BLOCK COURSE] Miss Haeseler 

57. THE TEACHING OF THE TIANO Credit, Three Hours 

Methods of teaching children notation, piano technique, elements of 
theory, rhythm, and ear training, with a systematic study of material suitable 
for beginners of all ages, as well as more advanced students. A survey of 
piano literature. 

Mr. Clyburn 

61. THE TEACHING OF STRING INSTRUMENTS Credit, Three Hours 

A shcjrt resume of the history of string instruments, their constructloa 
and litfrature. Mttliofls of teaching cliiklreii notation, elements of theory, 
ear-training, left-hand technique, bowing technique ; good tone production ; 
systematic study of material for pupils of all grades of advancement. 

Mrs. Garriss 

65, 66. WIND A.ND PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS Credit, One Hour 

Required of majors in public school music. Each Semester 

A practical study of the technique of two brass instruments, one wood- 
wind, and one percussion instrument. 

Mrs. Garriss 

67, 68. STRING IN.STRUMENTS Credit. One Hour 

Required of majors in public school music. Each Semester 

A practical study of string Instruments with emphasis on violin. 

Mrs. Garriss 

Ed. 85 Mus. MATERIALS AND METHOT»S OF 

TEACHING MUSIC IN THE GRADES Credit. Three Hours 

Prerequisiti> : Theory 2. Required of juniors 

majoring in jiublic school music. 

A study of tlu" various texts in use in the elementary grade.-*, the use 
of songs and dances, rhythmic studies for children. Planning the work In 
the classroom and for the year; methods of interesting children in music. 
Selection and i)r('sentatlon of rote song; the child voice In singing; the 
unmusical child: iiitroduclion of staff notation and the beginning of music 
reading ; directed listening. 

Miss Haeseler 



72 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Ed. 86 Mus. MATERIALS AND METHODS OP 

TEACHING MUSIC IN THE HIGH SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite : Theory 2. Required of 
juniors majoring in public school music. 

A study of the texts in use in the junior and senior high school. The 
adolescent voice and its care ; testing and classification of voices. The organi- 
zation and conduct of a high school department of music. Songs and texts 
suitable for high school use. 

Miss Haeseler 

93. FIELD WORK IN CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

95a. OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING 

IN APPLIED MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

The vcorli to be done in connection with Theory 57 or 61, under the 
direction of the professor giving such course. In some cases a limited amount 
of this credit allowed toward the requirement in directed teaching for the 
certificate. 

Prerequisites: Education 31 and Music 57. Mr. Clyburn 

95, 95S. OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING Credit, Three or 
IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS Six Hours Either 

Semester 
See Education, page 54. 

Prerequisites : Education 31, 52 ; Ed. 85, 86 Music. 

Miss Haeseler 

97. CONDUCTING Credit, Two Hours 

Required of students majoring in public school 
music and church music. 

Class meets three times weeljly. 

Essentials in conducting, baton technique. Practical experience In 
conducting in the college chorus. 

Mr. Blanchard 

ENSEMBLE 

69, 70. ENSEMBLE PLAYING Credit, Two Hours 

Each Semester 
A study of the standard ensemble literature ; open to all qualified students 
by arrangement with members of the faculty. ' Staff 

CHORUS Credit, One Hour 

Each Semester 

Two semesters required for all students majoring in music. Non-majors 
admitted on basis of auditions held at beginning of each semester. The 
Chorus as a whole, and groups selected from it, provide music for various 
college functions and give concerts on and off the campus. Attendance at 
three one-hour rehearsals each week and at all performances required. 

Miss Donley 

ORCHESTRA Credit, One-half Hour 

Each Semester 

An opportunity given to students to play in an orchestra, to hear their 
own arrangements performed, and to gain experience in conducting. 

Mrs. Garrlsa 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 

APPLIED MUSIC 

students In the music department who wish to take part in public 
programs should consult with their respective teachers and the hoad of the 
Department of Music in advance. 

All cdurses in applied music require three hours practice per week for 
each .semester hour credit; for every three semester hours credit, or fraction 
thereof, a student must take not less than one lesson a week, of at least a 
half-hour duration, throughout the semester. No student is permitted to 
take more than eight semester hours of applied music in any one semester. 
The work in applied music is adjusted to suit the needs of each individual 
student, but in general follows the outline of the following courses : 

PIANO 

Mr. Pratt, Mr. Clyburn, Miss Swanson, Miss Haeseler 

The materials used for technical development are variable, depending on 
the concepts of the teacher, and the individual needs of the pupil. A thorough 
knowledge of all scales and arpeggios should be established before a pupU 
enters Piano 1. 

1, 2. FRESHMAN PIANO. 

Bach InventiunK, Preludes, Suites; Sonatas of the difficulty of the Haydn 
In D major, Mozart F major (K. 332), and Beethoven Op. 14, No. 2; the 
easier Chopin Preludes, Valses, Mazurkas, Nocturnes; other classical, ro- 
mantic, and contemporary composers. 

21, 22. SOPHOMORE PIANO. 

Bach Three-Part Inventions, Well-Tempered Clavier, SvUes, Partitas; 
Mozart and Beethoven Sonatas; Chopin works of moderate difficulty; other 
classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

61, 52. JUNIOR PIANO. 

Bach Well-Tempered Clavier, Toecatas. Partitas, etc.; Mozart and Beetho- 
ven Sonatas; Chopin Etudes, Impromptux, Scherzi; Ballades; etc.; other 
classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

91, 92. SENIOR PIANO. 

Bach Well-Tempprcd Clavier, Chorale-l'reliidcs, and larger works; Beetho- 
ven Sonatas of greater dllTiculty ; Conccrti; Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, 
and Ravel works suitable for senior recital ; other classical, romantic, im- 
pressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

ORGAN 

Mr. Cooper, Miss Swanson, Miss Haeseler 

1, 2. FRESHMAN ORGAN. 

Manual and pedal tfchnique ; Bach Eight Short Preludes and Fugues; 
abort piece.** Involving the fundamentals of registration and use of the 
expression pedals ; hymn playing. Students beginning organ us'inlly take 
half their work in organ and half in piano. 

21, 22. SOPHOMORE ORGAN. 

Bach Preludes and Fugues of the first master period, Choral Preludei; 
sonatas by Oullmant, Mendelssohn; slintpler works of the modern schools; 
aecomi)anyliig. 



74 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

51, 52. JUNIOR ORGAN. 

Bach, smaller works of tbe mature master period, selected movements 
from tbe Trio Sonntas and Concertos; sonatas by Gullmant, Mendelssohn, 
Eheinberger, and others; pieces by classic and modern composers; service 
playing. 

91, 1)2. SENIOR ORGAN. 

Bach, larger works of the mature master period; compositions of Franek; 
symphonies of Widor, Vierne; compositions of the modern French, English, 
German, and American Schools. 

VIOLIN 

Mrs. Garriss 

1, 2. FRESHMAN VIOLIN. 

Thorough study of bowing and left-hand technique ; Laoureux Etudes, Bk. 
II ; Mazas Op. 36 ; concertos by De Beriot and Accolay ; sonatinas by 
Schubert. 

21, 22. SOPHOMORE VIOLIN. 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves; Mazas Etudes Speriales, Kreutzer 
Etudes; sonatas of Corelli and Handel; concertos by Rode, Viotti, and 
Kreutzer. 

51, 52. JUNIOR VIOLIN. 

Technical work continued ; etudes by Kreutzer and Fiorillo ; sonatas by 
Mozart and Beethoven; concertos by Viotti, Kreutzer, and Mozart. 

91, 92. SENIOR VIOLIN. 

Scales in thirds and octaves ; etudes by Rode and Gavlnies ; concertos by 
Vieuxtemps, WieniawsUi, Godard, and others; sonatas by Bach, Tartini, and 
Beethoven. 

ORCHESTRAL LNSTRUMENTS 

Courses in viola, flute, and other orchestral instruments will in some 
eases be ofllered on request, when qualified instruction is available by mem- 
bers of the departmental faculty. Credit will be given on the same basis as 
with other applied music. 

VOICE ^ 

Miss Donley, Mr. Blanchard 

1. 2. FRESHMAN VOICE. 

Position and poise of the body, strengthening exercises for the vocal 
mechanism, supplemented by technical exercises with musical figures for 
the development of vocal freedom. Simpler songs from classical literature. 
English and Italian pronunciation. 

21, 22. SOPHOMORE VOICE. 

Technical work of the freshman year continued ; scales and staccato 
exercises. Moderately difficult songs by composers of romantic, and con- 
temporary literature. French and German pronunciation. 

51, 52. JUNIOR VOICE. 

More advanced technique and vocalizations. Advanced literature. In- 
troduction of oratorio and operatic repertoire. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 75 

01, 92. SENIOR VOICE. 

Technical work continued, stressing flexibility. Total repertory should 
int-luUe I'uur arias from operatic literature ; four arias from oratorio litera- 
ture; twenty songs from the classic and romantic literature; twenty songs 
from modern literature. 

PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

Etliel Tilley, Professor 

Requirements for a major: Twenty-four hours in the Department with at 
least eighteen hour.s in I'sychology. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 21 Is a prerequisite for all other courses in Psychology. 

21. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to the methods of science and to psychology as a science 
of human behavior: heredity, environment; sensation, perception; emotions, 
motives, adjustments to conflicts and frustrations; intelligence, learning, 
remembering and forgetting, thinking ; observing and reporting ; individual 
aptitudes. 

22. GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to the chie' methods of laboratory psychology. Individual 
and group experiments in refle.xes. animal and h\iman learning, remembering, 
emotions, sensation, perception, imagery, illusions, fatigue, observing and 
reporting, and development of individual and group attitudes. Two class 
hours and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. 

[32. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT Credit, Three Hours] 

(\) Personal adjustment problems of normal people; (2) maintaining 
good mental health; (.3) increasing joy in life and social usefulness. Offered 
In alternate years. 

51. PSYCHOLOGY OF ABNORMAL REHAVIOR Credit, Three Hours 

(1) A brief history of the treatment of the mentally ill; (2) mild mental 
disorders and slight maladjustments to social living; ('A) syndromes of 
psychoses as they are classified today; (4) modern methods in diagnosis, 
treatment, and prevention of mriital illness. 

65. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Thive Hours 

(1) Communication among human beings; (2) differences and likenesses 
In social groups; (.3) the individual as a member of groups; (-1) meeting 
prolilems f)f social living, such as competition for nuiterial goods, war, 
prejudice, problems in perception, and changing customs In marriage and 
family lit'c 

[57. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY Credit. Three Hours] 

A study of the [)ra<tical appllcaniins of psychology In i)ersnnrtl develop- 
ment and social relations; in business:, lTidu>;lry. and proressions ; in clinics. 
Each student will add to her (.'cneral study an Individual Investigation In a 
field of her Interest. Ofifered la alternate years. 



76 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

58. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY Credit, Three Hours 

(1) The development and functioning of normal personality ; (2) theories 
of defining, assessing, and interpreting personality. 

98. DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY AND 

FIELDS OF PSYCHOLOGY Credit, One to Three Hours 

Offered on demand. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 23 or 24 is a prerequisite for all other courses In Philosophy, 
except by special permission. 

23. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours 

A student-developed course. The method differs from year to year. 
Lectures, discussions, student reports on materials chosen by the reporters. 

[24. LOGIC Credit, Three Hours] 

(1) Clearness in the use of words; (2) deductive logic; (3) Inductive 
logic; (4) a brief introduction to symbolic logic. Offered in alternate years. 

[52. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours] 

From Thales to Thomas Aquinas. Offered in alternate years. 

54. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours 

From the revolt against scholasticism to the present day. 

64. PLATO Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the Dialognes and of Platonic Influence on western philosophy. 

RELIGION 

Ralph E. McLain, Professor 

Roger H. Crook, Professor 

Bernard H. Cocliran, Assistant Professor 

Requirements for a major : Eighteen hours beyond 1, 2. ^ 

1, 2. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE OLD AND NEW 

TESTAMENTS Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the central message of the Bible. Staff 

47. WORLD-WIDE CHRISTIANITY Credit, Three Hours 

The veorld mission of the Christian religion as it confronts our age. 

Mr. McLain 

48. THE RELIGIONS OF MANKIND Credit, Three Hours 
A survey and analysis of the great religions of the world. Mr. McLain 

51. LEADERSHIP IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
The principles and techniques of Christian leadership. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

[63. THE COURSE OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS Credit, Three Hours] 

The expansion of Christianity in its world mission from the first century 
to the present. Mr. Cochran 

[55. THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE Credit, Three Hours] 

A study of the great literary expression in the Bible, with an intensive 
study of Job, Psalms, and other Wisdom writings together with a study of the 
theology of contemporary literature. Mr. McLain 

56. THE LOCAL CHURCH PROGRAM Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the specific elements in developing an effective program. 

61. CHRISTIAN BEGINNINGS AND MODERN 

DENOMINATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

A historical survey of the Christian movement from the first century to 
present day trends. Mr. Cochran 

62. BAPTIST HISTORY AND BELIEFS Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the development and distinctive contributions of the Baptist 
people. Mr. Cochran 

64. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the development of the Christian church in America and 

Its distinctive contribution to our life and culture. 

Mr. Cochran 

65. THE PROPHETIC ELEMENT IN RELIGION Credit, Three Hours 

A Study of the nature and function of the prophet in any age, with 
major attention given to a study of the prophetic books of the Old Testament. 

Mr. Crook 

66. PAULINE LITERATURE Credit, Three Hours 

The development of early Christianity as found In the work and writings 
of Paul. Mr. Crook 

60. FOUNDATIONS OP CHRISTIAN THOUGHT Credit, Three Hours 

The nature and function of science, philosophy, and religion together 
with an analysis of the major problems Involved in Christian thought. 

Mr. McLain, Mr. Cochran 

70. CHRISTIAN ETHICS Credit, Three Hours 

The province, presuppositions, and Ideal of the Christian ethic and Its 
meaning for specific iiroblenis In our day. Mr. Crook 

72. PSYCHOLOGY OP RELIGIOUS LIVING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the results of psychological analysis of religious experiences 
with a view to understanding better the work of Christian counseling. 

Prerequisite : Education 31 or Psychology 21. 

8.>^. TRENDS IN CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN 

THOUGHT Credit. Three Hours 

I'lertMiulsiti' : Reli;,'l(iii 17 uiul either Philosophy 2.'< or Religion liO. 

.Vii analytical survey of trends In contemiwrary Christian thought and 
leadership. Mr. McLain 



78 j[i:pj:ii!Tii cor.i.K(;R 

SOCIOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Leslie W. Syron, Professor 

Ira 0. Jones, Assistant Professor 

Anna B. Peck, Part-time Instructor 

Sociology 21 is a prerequisite for all other courses in sociology. 

Requirements for a major in sociology : Twenty-four hours in sociology 
including 21, 22, and 99, or their equivalents. 

21 or 21S. rRIXCII'LES OF SOCIOLOGY Credit. Three Hours 

A general introduction to the field of sociology with emphasis upon 

culture, collective behavior, inter-group relations, community, institutions, 

and social change. Staff 

22. SOCIAL PROBLEMS Credit, Three Hours 

An analysis of some of the ma.ior problems of personal and social dis- 
organization in contejnporary society with emphasis upou causes, treatment, 
and prevention. Staff 

51. AMERICAN MINORITY PEOPLES Credit, Three Hours 
A study of present day racial and cultural minorities with emphasis 

upon scientific facts about race and on changing attitudes and policies. 

Mr. Jones 

52. CRIMINOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 
An analysis of the nature and extent of criminal behavior, factors 

which seem to be related to such behavior, and changing attitudes toward 
the criminal and crime control. Mr. .Tones 

G3. THE COMMUNITY Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the structure and function of rural and urban communities, 
their institutions and problems. Air. Jones 

6G. REGIONAL SOCIOLOGY OF THE SOUTH Credit, Three Hours 

A brief survey of the development of ecological, economic, and cultural 
patterns in the southeastern states ; comparisou with other regions. 

Miss. Syron 

71. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Credit, Tliree Hours 

An introduction to anthropology with special emphasis on comparative 
study of preliterate and simpler cultures. Miss Syron 

72. COMPARATIVE CULTURES Credit, Three Hours 

A study of selected areas throughout the world with special emphasis on 
the rapid modernization of undeveloped areas. Miss Syron 

74, 74F. THE FAMILY Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the origin and structure of the family and its functions as the 
basic institution of society ; an analysis of contemporary marriage and 
family experience with emphasis on necessar.v adjustments, resources and 
values. Mr. Jones 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 79 

Y8. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL RESEARCH Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the general field of sociological research ; methods of develop- 
ing studies and analyzing sociological data. Miss Syron 

W. DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY Credit, One-Three Hours 

Research and study in a special field outside the regular departmental 
offerings. Open by permission of the head of the department to senior 
major students. Miss Syron 

97. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK Credit, Three Hours 

A pre-professional course to introduce the student to the field of social 
work ; directed activity in outside agencies. Miss Syron 

99. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the history of social thought from ancient times to the 
present, with particular emphasis on contemporary sociological thought. 

Miss Syron 

GEOGRAPHY 

21. PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GEOORArHY Credit, Three Hours 

An introductory world-wide survey of the distribution and characteristics 
of tlu' elements of the natural environment, with particular reference to the 
bearing of the natural environment on the life of man. 

Miss Peck 

22. GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA Credit, Three Hours 

The regions of the United States, Canada, Alaska, and Greenland with 
regard to their physical features, resources, economic activities and social 
setting. Miss Peck 



DEGREES CONrERUED IN 1961 

Bachelor of Arts 

Allen, Mary Lou Rockingham 

Arline, Margaret Gainfort Raleigh 

Baker, Jeanelle Hill Colerain 

Barnes, Carol Ann Jorles Raleigh 

Basnight, Mabel Jean Manteo 

Bellios, Demetra George Laurinburg 

Biles, Martha Theresa Winston-Salem 

Bowers, Sara Sue Knightdale 

Boyette, Andrea Camille Kenly 

Boyette, Rena Elizabeth Kenly 

Bradshaw, Ruby Lane Wilmington 

Bramlett, Katherine Arfne Irby Raleigh 

Brice, Patricia Reid Sanford 

Brinn, Gail Marie Sanford 

Britt, Barbara Ann — Cum Laude Snow Hill 

Britton, Anne Elizabeth — Cum Laude Dunn 

Brooks, Virginia Beale Warsaw, Va. 

Brotherton, Netta Katheryn Robinson Raleigh 

Bumgarrter, Barbara Jean Louisburg 

Bunch, Anne Paige Elizabeth City 

Caldwell, Mary Lynn Charlotte 

Campbell, Nancy Carol — Cum Laude Lakeland, Fla. 

Capps, Janice Louise Fayetteville 

Carawan, Dorothy Wilson Maynard Harrells 

Chick, Sara Catherine Atkins Raleigh 

Cole, Betty Margaret Durham 

Cope, Etta Joan Charlotte 

Corbett, Pearl Faye Ivanhoe 

Covington, Anrt LeStourgeon — Cum Laude Wadesboro 

Cowles, Donna Gay Charlotte 

Currin, Alice Catherine Oxford 

Daniel, Ann Lupton Wilson 

Daniel, Celia Jane New Bern 

David, Ronalie Scharff Raleigh 

de los Reyes, Lydia Lantin Laguna, Philippirtes 

Edwards, Barbara Linda Dobson .'.Raleigh 

Edwards, Marjorie Faye Knightdale 

Elder, Anne Greensboro 

Evans, Emily Lureese Conway 

Everett, Anita Ray Robersonville 

Faircloth, Edna Faye Garland 

Forbes, Julia Ann Wilson 

Formy-duval, Priscilla Faye Carter Chadboum 

Fowler, Mary Margaret Tabor City 

Frye, Bettie Reid Waltort .Raleigh 

Gaylord, Nancy Sue Jamesville 

Gordon, Mary Ruth Marion 

(80) 



DEGREES CONFERRED Hi 1961 81 

Grady, Jacqueline New Bern 

Gray, Gaynelle Newport 

Green, Elizabeth Ann Andrews, S. C. 

Green, Phyllis Carol Stem 

Greene, Zelma La Rue Zebulon 

Gurkin, Crissie Louise Williamston 

Haitovski, Dalia Tel-Katzir, Israel 

Hamrick, Carole La Verne Shelby 

Hardee, Julia Ann Ertfield 

Harrelson, Willie Imogene Clinton 

Harris, Dorothy Matilda Littleton 

Helms, Mary Bernard Monroe 

Holbrook, Sally Ann Charlotte 

Holland, Dessie Belle Smithfield 

Horton, Julia Ann Apex 

Howell, Alexa Pauline Norwood 

Howell, Nora Cauline Norwood 

Howie, Julia Anrr Monroe 

Hudson, Mary Louise Benson 

Hurst, Margaret Lorene — Cum Laude Wilmington 

Isenhour, Ann Crouch Raleigh 

Jenkins, Mildred Allen Creedmoor 

Johnson, Betty Riley Raleigh 

Johnson, Linda Harfaitd Durham 

Jones, Judith Rodwell Seven Springs 

Joyce, Emily Nelson Dunn — Cum Laude Raleigh 

Kelly, Frances Gayle Tabor City 

Kennedy, Betty Lou Mount Olive 

Kinlaw, Betty Jo Raeford 

Kleiman, Madeline Enid — Cum Laude Raleigh 

Lassiter, Mary Lee Corapeake 

Leath, Carolyn Suzantie — Summa Cum Laude Shelby 

Lee, Shirley McCotter — Cum Laude Arapahoe 

Lee, Zula Faye — Summa Cum Laude Raleigh 

Liles, Carolyn Elizabeth Cincinnati, Ohio 

Lyon, Betsy Grant Northside 

MacQueen, Mary Williams Gee Henderson 

McKenney, Myra Hope Virgrinia Beach, Va. 

McMillan, Martha Murphy Red Springs 

McNeill, Jlargaret Anna Ratley — Cum Laude Red Springs 

Martey, Alice Gayle Swannanoa 

Marsh, Linda Elaine Greensboro 

Martin, Aniee Marie High Point 

Mattocks, Sonia Elizabeth New Bern 

Moss, Ruth Avery Wilson 

Neblett, Helen Ryland Raleigh 

Newell, Wanda Walstonburg 

Newton, Ruby Gail Kenansville 

Orr, Betty Louise Mountain Home 

Padgett, Virgirtia Ruth Cliffside 

Parrish, Claudia Louise Salisbury 

Parrish, Mary Stokes Durham 



82 MEEEDITH COLLEGE 

Patterson, Peggy Rasberry Wake Forest 

Peacock, Clara Lou Fremont 

Perkins, Mary Lynne Southerland Raleigh 

Peters, Elizabeth Ann Washington 

Pope, Emma Josephine Mocksville 

Prince, Ruth Anne Arnold Fuquay Springs 

Rhue, Patricia Joy Raleigh 

Rice, Kathryn Anrt — Magna Cum Lande Sunbury 

Ricks, Margaret Beal Whitakers 

Rivenbark, Thyra Elizabeth Kinston 

Rogers, Margie Sue — Cum Laude Monroe 

Rogers, Rachel Jeanette Boydton, Va. 

Rountree, Novella Elizabeth Sunbury 

Rowe, Maggie Ann — Cum Laude Raleigh 

Sault, Suzanne Mary Newport News, Va. 

Schaffer, Judith Louise Greensboro 

Scott, Joan Rebecca — Cum Laude Raleigh 

Scott, Nancy Jane Haw River 

Scott, Stepharde Leslie Raleigh 

Self, Susan Amanda Asheville 

Sharpe, Anne Hunter Cherryville 

Simmons, Jane Kathleen — Cum Laude Mount Airy 

Simpson, Evalyn Montreys Wilmington 

Smith, Joyce Ann Stanley 

Spearman, Gwertdolyn Joan Greenville, S. C. 

Stallings, Miriam Ann Smithfield 

Starke, Eleanor Douglas Raleigh 

Stevens, Molly Scott Arlington, Va. 

Stewart, Quincy Ann Tuckasegee 

Strayhom, Hilda Anne Hillsboro 

Strayhorn, Sylvia Sidney Belmont 

Stroupe, Phyllis Gail Homestead, Fla. 

Sullivan, Barbara Arfn Statesville 

Taylor, Jenny Lou Deep Run 

Thomas, Nancy Louise Leaksville 

Timberlake, Betty Jean Edwards Raleigh 

Tucker, Elizabeth Ann Albemarle 

Turlington, Jennie Parker Salemburg 

Turner, Nancy Anne Asheboro 

Valentine, Frartces Jane Dorward Whiteville 

Vick, Catharine Rollins Raleigh 

Wagner, Nina Elizabeth Charlotte 

Warwick, Mary Carol Lumberton 

Webster, Ruby Mae Chapel Hill 

Wenberg, Barbara Lee Wilmington 

Whedbee, Nancy Leigh Ahoskie 

Whisnant, Linda Lucy Hickory 

White, Donna Helen Greensboro 

Williams, Phyllis Aifne Fayetteville 

Woody, Elizabeth Thornton Plant City, Fla. 

Worthington, Alma Jeannette Ayden 

Young, Elizabeth Anne Hutchins Durham 



REGISTER OV STUDENTS 



Seniors 



Adams, Elizabeth Pate Rowland 

Adler, Johanna McKevlin. -Raleigh 
Allen, Betty Jane Eagles — Raleigh 
Arrington, 

Lynda Jean Copley Durham 

Atkins, Delores Leslie Durham 

Averette, 

Betty Glenn Blackard Raleigh 

Ayscue, 

Mildred Jean Fuquay Springs 

Ballard, Shirley Ann Mooresville 

Barrett, Bryna Mildred Raleigh 

Baugham, Mary Ogie Smithfield 

Benton, 

Lucille Weatherspoon-Laiirinburg 

Blair, Martha Sarah Gretrta, Va. 

Blount, Mae Letitia- -Elizabeth City 

Bone, Betty Hale Laurinburg 

Brannan, Elizabeth Smith Gary 

Braswell, 

Elizabeth Anne Wadesboro 

Briggs, Jenny Lillian Leasburg 

Brock, Margaret Carole. Mount Olive 
Leatherwood, 

Theresa Ernestine Brown-Raleigh 

Brunt, Henri Karl Fisher Raleigh 

Bryant, Patricia Ann Rich Square 

Buchanan, Jeanne 

Marie Myers Winston-Salem 

Buffaloe, Edrta Edmundson_Raleigh 
Bullard, Judith Ann-Baltimore, Md. 

Butler, Lucy Helen Fayetteville 

Browning, 

Virginia Bridgerc Raleigh 

Caldv.'ell, Celia Ann Boger City 

Camp, Seleda Ruth Gastonia 

Gartner, Anna Lee New Bern 

Chandler, Sara Ann Statesville 

Cheaves, Nancy Rose Spring Hope 

Christenbury, 

Patricia Ann Charlotte 

Clark, Daphne Joan Fieldale, Va. 

Clark, Joyce Nelson, Va. 

Collie, Dorothy Joyce Pelham 

Cooper, 

Frances Gwendolyn Nashville 

Corbett. Cynthia Tabor City 

Corpening, Melinda Kay Trj'on 

Courie, 

Elizabeth Ann Raynor-Burlington 
Creech, Susan Helen Smithfield 



Crutchfield, Margaret 

Newlin Leonard Roanoke, Va. 

Dailey, Rachel Carolyn Jackson 

DaverTport, 

Berma Jean Fayetteville 

Davis, Brenda Gail Ayden 

DeLoatch, Peggy Lula Conway 

Dodd, 

Harriet Bruce Wake Forest 

Dorsett, Margaret Lamb Raleigh 

Dryden, 

Verna Nora Princess Anne, Md. 

Eason, Mary Anne Rocky Mount 

Epps, Lora Evelena Lumberton 

Feltner, Karen Sommer Raleigh 

Fender, Clayta Ann Sparta 

Garner, Joyce Cameron-Mount Olive 

Gash, Marjorie Graham Raleigh 

Gatlin, Lilmar Sue Raeford 

Gillespie, Elaine Le Dhu-Mooresville 

Glenn, Victoria Jane Durham 

Goodwin, Judith Fayetteville 

Gorham, 

Frcnces Anne Rocky Mount 

Graham, Sallie Victoria--Bakersville 
Gravott, Katherine 

Painter Roanoke. Va. 

Gray, Lena Elizabeth Enfield 

Gruits, 

Rosa Lynn Alexandria, Va. 

Hales. Linda Katherine Supply 

Hall, Lula Isabel Tate Gary 

Hamrick, 

Ann Marie Fisher Fayetteville 

Hatley, Amy Lu Bell Raleigh 

Hawkins, Mary Carolyn--Asheville 

Heck, Anna Carol Rocky Mount 

Hege, Sorfja Jean Winston-Salem 

Hensley, Beverly Jean Burnsville 

Hicks, Carroll Ann Raleigh 

Hill, Elizabeth Lee--Richmond, Va. 

Hines, Reca Sanders Raleigh 

Holden, Nancy Fay Youngsville 

Holland, Tiny Sue Apex 

Holloway, Mary Ammons Raleigh 

Horton, Sandra Sue Louisburg 

Howard, 

Ann Taylor Johnson Greensboro 

Howard, 

Scarlett Leigh Hill Raleigh 

Huffman, Maurine Drexel 



(83) 



84 



MEBEDITH COLLEGE 



Jackson, Patricia Ann Colerain 

Jeffcoat, „, , -r^ i 

Sylvia O'Daniel Wake Forest 

Johnson, 

Judy LeClaire Winston-Salem 

Jones, Anita Louise Oxford 

Journigan, Diane Ford--Henderson 
Kendall, Carol Elizabeth— Mars Hill 
Kirby, Linda Louise.Winston-Salem 
Knight, Carol Jean Ahoskie 

Lackey, t^ , • i, 

Suzanne Brickhouse Raleigh 

Lawrence, Jane Elizabeth.-Colerain 

^Carolyn Miller. -Falls Church, Va. 
Leathers, Susan Louise— Henderson 

Lee, Linda Rose Benson 

Leggett, Patricia Anne— -Asheboro 
Leiby, Sara Louise.-Arlington, Va. 

Leist, Jo Ann Claytort Kenley 

Long, Janice Roberta Monroe 

Lowe, Rachel Virginia Gastonia 

McClendon „ , . ■ 

Janice Lee Wright Raleigh 

McCombs, Dorothy Foster— Raleigh 
McDonald, Terra Gay--FayetteviUe 

McFall, Julia Annette Madison 

McGranahan, Nancy Joan.. Durham 
McGuirt, Margaret Neal—— Monroe 
Makepeace, Kitty Clyde Sanford 

Maner, . ttt j u 

Marilyn Katharine Wadesboro 

Maness, Hilda Jo Thomasville 

Martin, Judy tt- u n • <- 

Elizabeth Purcelle High Point 

Martin, Peggy Joan- Belmont 

Matthews, Jessie Mae Long— Severrt 

Mauldin, ^ .„ n /^ 

Sarah Thaekston-Greenville, S. C. 

Medlin, _, , ., . 

Glenda Gail Myers-Wake Forest 

Milam, Mary Lasley Raleigh 

Miller, „, , „.,, 

Frances Ruth Walston.Chapel Hill 

Moore, Janice Belford Raleigh 

Morgan, „ . -n 

Martha Virginia Marshville 

Morrow, Sara Elizabeth-Morganton 

Moseley, Shirley Dixon Ayden 

Motsinger, 

Linda Elains Kemersville 

Murray. Martha Kirk Ralpigh 

Nash, Sylvia Angel -Raleigh 

Neal, Betty Lynn -High Point 

Newton, Ruby Gail Kenansville 

Nicholds, Carolyn Faye-.Albemarle 

Nichols, .,1 -CT 

Mary Louise Jacksonville, Fla. 



Park, Carol Joyce Charlotte 

Pr.rker 

Billie Rebecca Pollocksville 

Patton, Mildred Ann Canton 

Payne, 

Brenda Leah- -London Bridge, Va. 

Mary Elizabeth Hight-Henderson 

Perry, Emma Lou Zebulon 

Peterson, Eula Elizabeth Bolton 

Peterson', Mary Susan Raleigh 

Phillips, , T> -J 

Nancy Louise Roanoke Rapids 

Picklesimer, 

Gwendolyn Mae.. -Pisgah Forest 

Proctor, „ , . , 

Elizabeth Rosalyn Dupree.Raleigh 

Pruitt, Kathryn Shaw Raleigh 

Puckett, 

Janet Bernard Richmond, Va. 

Rankin, Edith Elizabeth Raleigh 

Reveley, Mary Floyd Raleigh 

Ricker, Nancy Eaton— Norfolk, Va. 

Rivers, Harriet Ann Wadesboro 

Roberts, Florence Kathleen-Raleigh 
Roberts, Ruth Elaine Dail- -Raleigh 

Robinson, Nancy Amelia Clyde 

Rohlfing, Carol Lehman Raleigh 

Ross, Susan Lou Ayden 

Roughton, Florence Arlene_Raleigh 

Senter, Ida Carol Lillington 

Shadoin, Anna Kathryn-Greensboro 
Shoaf, Sarah Caroline Lenoir 

Shuman, ^^ , 

Wynorta Patricia Henderson 

Simmons, Linnie Dianne.-Mt. Airy 
Simpson, Catherine 

Woodhouse Robersonville 

Smith, Judy Lavonne Kinston 

Smith, Salie Alene Monroe 

Sorrell, Julia Ann Wadesboro 

Stanley, Sandra Sue High Toint 

Steen, Pattie Helms Salisbury 

Stewart, Barbara Lynne Coats 

Stov/e, Dorothy Parker Raleigh 

Stuart, Ferrt Dahlstrom Raleigh 

Stuckey, Martha Ann Raleigh 

Styron, Nell Joslin Raleigh 

Summey. Beverly Yvonne-Gastonia 

Taylor, " Patricia Ann Kinston 

Taylor, Patricia Ann Stetesville 

Tew, Jean Butler Salemburg 

Thomas, Margaret Ann- -Lexington 
Tomlinsorf, . 

Margaret Barrett Louisburg 

Vining, Julia Anne Garner 

Walker, Sandra Joan Morganton 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



85 



Walston, Patricia May Nashville 

Warwick, Mary Carol Lumberton 

Weeks, Kathryn Jeart Raleigh 

White, Anne Hardaway Oxford 

White, Beverly Mae Youngsville 

Wilkins, Marguerite Davis--Durham 
Williams, Carol 

Walden Harris Richmond, Va. 

Williams, Nancy Ellen Greensboro 

Williams, Sybil Lorena. .Tabor City 
Wilson, Nancy Carol Gastonia 



Wolfe, Mary Ann Burgaw 

Wood, Carol Rose Raleigh 

Woodall, Elizabeth Ellen Erwin 

Worthington, Sadie Sue Kinston 

Yancey, Donna Louise Gastonia 

Yancey, Julianna Oxford 

Yates, Nancy Doris Charlotte 

Yniguez, 

Zenaida Reyes-Manila, Phillipines 

Young, Jacquelyn Talley Beaufort 

Young, Judith Ann Wake Forest 



Juniors 



Allen, Barbara 

Susan Blanchard Rose Hill 

Anders, 

Elsa Cartwright--Hendersonville 

Armour, Nancy Davis Statesville 

Armstrong, 

Mary Devericks Charlotte 

Armstrong, Ruth Fisher_. Charlotte 

Avery, Judith Leigh Erwin 

Baker, Norma Louise Lexington 

Baker, Sarah Jean Fallston 

Ballou, 

Martha Manly Leesburg, Fla. 

Barbae, Clabron Ann Morrisville 

Earnhardt, Ann Drucilla Concord 

Barnhill, 

Geneva Undine Scotland Neck 

Baxter, Linda Carole Robbins 

Benthall. Betsy Bland Woodland 

Bibb, Jerrie Lynn Preston. -Raleigh 

Blalock, Linda Hamrick Raleigh 

Boone, Helen Pauline Raleigh 

Branch, Laura Wytol Enfield 

Brantley, JoaiT LaRue Selma 

Bullard, Elizabeth Earle. Lumberton 

Bunn. Brenda Frances Zebulon 

Ciirper, Martha Ann Raleigh 

Carver, 

Mary Frances Roanoke Rapids 

Christian, Martha Carol Durham 

Clark, 

Brenda Carole Virgilina, Va. 

Colo. Harriet Clark.. Carolina Beach 

Cooper, Sylvia Annette Aberdeen 

Corbett, Brenda Virginia Selma 

Dnil, Nancy Elizabeth. .Mount Olive 

Daniel, Helen Finch Elm City 

Darwish, Salwa Abdel 

Aziz Falmy Alexandria, Egypt 

Davenport, Katherine 

Gene Pactolus 

Davis, Mary Louise Sanford 



Edison, 

Nancy Elizabeth Edwards. Raleigh 

Elliott, Martha Theresa Raleigh 

Elliott, 

Susan Gregory Danville, Va. 

Fanney, Mary Condrey Cary 

Fisher, Gladys Sandra Clinton 

Foster, Linda Jean Kernersville 

Funderburk, 

Judith Lee Aberdeen 

Fuqua, Elizabeth Keighrorf.Raleigh 
Gainey, 

Anrte Henley Wake Forest 

Graves, Judy Annette Clinton 

Griffin, Rebecca Ann Monroe 

Hall, Marion King Harrells 

Hamrick, 

Norma Jane Kings Mountain 

Harrington, Dixie Ruth..Goldsboro 
Hawkins, Susan Curtis.. Greensboro 
Haywood, 

Elizabeth Jane.Pennsauken, N. J. 

Heffner, Barbara Jean Salisbury 

Hickf, Tola Mae Oxford 

Hollaman, 

Donna Elizabeth.. Hendersonville 

Huff, Beverlye Ann Sanford 

Hughes, Mai-y Beth Colerain 

Hui, 

Berny Bing Lee Taipei, Taiwan 

Hutrhins, 

Patricia Carson Greensboro 

Hutto, Nina Jean Goldsboro 

Irons, Vicki Kay Derreberry. Raleigh 

Johnson, Betty Jo Benson 

Johnson, Jo Anne Statesville 

Johnson, 

Mamie Lou Roberts Smithfield 

Johnson, Vera Temple Hertford 

Jones, Barbara Ann Durham 

Jones, 

Janet Faye Seven Springs 

Jones. 

Nancy Katherine Pink Hill 



86 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Kelly, Kathryn O'Neal— Tabor City 
Einkead, 

Donna Jean Rocky Mount 

Kinlaw, Peggy Ann Raeford 

Klick, 

Margaret Louise Hendersonville 

Knight, Frances Kay Ahoskie 

Lawton, 

Elizabeth Ann-Georgetown, S. C. 

Leffler, Gretchen Ruth Charlotte 

Leonard, June Carol-Winston-Salem 

Lewis, Alice Jane Rutherfordton 

Link, Jane Elizabeth Warrenton 

McCormick, 

Mary Elizabeth Fairmont 

McGee, 

Velma Ruth Winston-Salem 

McKelvey, 

Stella Jean Burrell Raleigh 

McLamb, LaRue Benson 

McManus, Elizabeth Lee.Albemarle 
McPhaul, Hazel Ellen__Red Springs 
Macdonald, 

Ellen Fisher Hendersonville 

Miller, Carolyn Earley Stuart, Va. 

Moore, Constance Gayle Raleigh 

Morgan, Mary Louise Oxford 

Morris, Billie Jean Lumberton 

Northcutt, Eileert Hagie Gary 

Parker, 

Elizabeth Anne Richmond, Va. 

Pate, Mary Belle Asheboro 

Pearce, Millicent Katherine Lenoir 

Philbrick, Nena Leigh Gary 

Pollock, Jean Ellen Trenton 

Pope, Anne Gertrude Magnolia 

Powe, Ann Stafford Raleigh 

Puckett, Mabel Ann Richmond, Va. 

Rains, Patricia Anne Princeton 

Ramsey, Sarah Martha Brevard 

Ratehford, Emily Jean Gastonia 



Renfrew, 

Nancy Elizabeth Fayetteville 

Rogers, 

Ellen Lockhart Albemarle 

Sherrill, 

Elizabeth Louise Greensboro 

Rogers, Patricia Ann Raleigh 

Rose, Sylvia Delyghte Snow Hill 

Rouzer, Mary Susan Salisbury 

Sanders, Ann Carol Four Oaks 

Sawyer, Myra Kaye Elizabeth City 

Sears, 

Nancy Hercelia Stephens-Raleigh 
Short, 

Gwendolyn Lenora-Baltimore, Md. 
Shouse, 

Judy Elizabeth Winston- Salem 

Smith, Gloria 

Jeanne Elizabethtown 

Smith. 

Jeanne Elizabeth Poole Raleigh 

Smith, Sarah Kathryn Wingate 

Spence, Martha Gray Greensboro 

Starlirtg, 

Faye Dean Creech Pine Level 

Stem, 

Betsy Hughes Darlington, S. C. 

Strickland, Joan Kaye Smithfield 

Swain. Judith Mizelle Raleigh 

Sykes, Eloise Edwards Raleigh 

Thornton, Linda Gail Four Oaks 

Tripp, Joyce Dean Suffolk, Va. 

Walker, Barbara Ann Snowden 

Weede, 

Katherine Covington _Cheraw, S. C. 

Williams, Leah Rose Wilmington 

Williams, Miriamne Sims 

Wood, Betsy Barbour Benson 

York, Betsy Rush Asheboro 

Young, Betty Anna Wake Forest 

Youngblood, 

Katharyn Margaret Raleigh 



Sophomores 



Adams, Joy Anne Morven 

Aiken, Lou Yvonne Concord 

Allen, 

Marie-Louise Silver Spring, Md. 

Almond, Judith Carolyn Aberdeen 

Anderson, 

Sandra Elizabeth Charlotte 

Austin. Phyllis Carmen. -Four Oaks 
Baldwin, 

Mary Williams Whiteville 

Barber, Rebecca 

Ann Wilson Elizabethtown 

Beach, Jo Townsend Raleigh 

Beaver, Katherine Scott Asheville 



Bell, Martha Brooks Tabor City 

Bell, Mary Alice Aulander 

Bescher, 

Patricia Gayle High Point 

Bivens. Barbara Ruth Monroe 

Boutwell, Jean Youngblood. Raleigh 

Bowers. Barbara Diane Siler City 

Brasweil, Phyllis Annette Zebulon 

Brock, Betty Lou Rockv Mount 

Bryan, Sara Gwynn Roseboro 

Bumpass, Jane Carver Roxboro 

Burns, Margaret Kay Whiteville 

Butler. Sandra Jo Roseboro 

Cash, Sylvia Ann Rutherfordton 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



87 



Chalkley, 

Elizabeth Prazee.. Richmond, Va. 
Chappell, Elizabeth Jean.. Nashville 
Childrey, 

Anita Maier Richmond, Va. 

Clifton, Meredith Jane Charlotte 

Cockerham, 

Ann Lucile Winston-Salem 

Cogdill, Jane Linda Asheville 

Cole, Brenda Ann Lenoir 

Copeland, 

Mary Judith Roanoke Rapids 

Covington, 

Teresa Antoinette Rockingham 

Coxe, Eugenia Carol Raleigh 

Craven, Martha Susanne Sanford 

Creighton, Virginia Lynne.Charlotte 

Crowder, Hildreth Jo Raleigh 

Davis, Alma Watson Raleigh 

Davis, 

Marcia Wells No. Easton, Mass. 

Dean, Phyllis Ann Raleigh 

DeWitt, Frances Ann Apex 

Drewes, Betty Lou Raleigh 

Edwards, Camille Griffin Raleigh 

Elliott, Brenda Kay Winfall 

Ellis, Mary Ellen Fremont 

Ennis, Barbara Sue Dunn 

Evans, Linda Gale High Point 

Evans, Nancy Bronxville. N. Y. 

FaP'g, Dona Lynn Raleigh 

Farmer, Frieda Jane.Lynchburg, Va. 
Featherston, 

Mary Eugenia Fort Payne, Ala. 

Fish, Peggy Joyce Wilson 

Forbes, Betsy Jane Wilson 

Foxworth, Eva Mae.Winston-Salem 
Fritsche, 

Brenda Thomas Haverford, Pa. 

Galloway, Carol Sue Charlotte 

Gibbs, Mary Alice Raleigh 

Gilliam, Rebecca Ann Raleigh 

Glenn, Frances Kathleen. .Durham 
Godwin, 

Elizabeth Smith Greensboro 

Godwin, Nancy Llewellyn.Charlotte 

Grayson, Judith Gale High Point 

Griffin, Lois Elaine Williamston 

Grigg, Rebecca Lynne Raleigh 

Grimshaw, 

Mary Ann Taylors, S. C. 

Hammer, Penny Lou Rocky Mount 

Harrill, 

Sandra Gayle Gaffnev, S. C. 

Hart, Phyllis Rosalind Charlotte 

Hartley, Harriett Elizabeth. Welcome 

Hartness, Froda Barry Sanford 

Hayes, Rebecca Faith Hickory 

Haywood, Martha Chason Candor 

Hinsoit, Lucy Aldridge Raleigh 



Hodges, Anne Palmer Farmville 

Holbert, Jerry Lou Albemarle 

Holleman, Ruth Elizabeth. .Durham 

Holloway, Virginia Lee Raleigh 

Hooks, Betty Bowman Fremont 

Houghton, 

Margaret Clay Danville, Va. 

Hov/srd, 

Frances Ann Richmond, Va. 

Humirez, 

Blanca Seleme La Paz, Bolivia 

Humphrey, Rose Marie New Bern 

Israel, Mary Irene McCain 

James, Sue Anne Raleigh 

Jeffords, 

Bobbie Lynne Columbus, Ga. 

Johnson, Frances Lewis. Greensboro 

Johnson, Judi Frances Angler 

Johnson, Linda Kay Goldsboro 

Johnson, Paula Sue Lillington 

Johnson, Ruth Ellen Goldsboro 

Kern, 

Margaret Louise.TrumbuU, Conn. 
Kidd, 

Elizabeth Fitchett Haw River 

Kincaid, Linda Joan Charlotte 

Krause, Mary Clare Asheville 

Lambeth, Ann Shirley Lumberton 

Lay, Patricia 

Lockhart Falls Church, Va. 

Lennon, Ruth Carter Raleigh 

Littlefield, Mary Jill Gastonia 

Lloyd, Diana Nell Dupree.. Raleigh 

Long, Betsy Rose Roxboro 

McFarland, Lelia Downey Oxford 

McFarland, Lillian Frances. .Oxford 
McKenney, 

Mary Lyon Virginia Beach, Va. 

McLester, 

Martha Lea..M3rrtle Beach, S. C. 

McManus, Mary Juhan Matthews 

McNairy, 

Frances King Greensboro 

Mackintosh, Joyce Ellen Raleigh 

Maki, Marilyn Carol Raleigh 

Martin, Alice Victoria Jamesville 

Mathis, Anna Lou Rutherfordton 

Matthews, 

Rebecca Grace Arlington, Va. 

Milford, Betty Louise Charlotte 

Moody, 

Sue Ellen Louisville, Ky. 

Morgan, Anrt Creel Gary 

Morgan, Rhonda Kay Lexington 

Murray, 

Elizabeth Gertrude Goldsboro 

Nooc, Ann Fravel Pittsboro 

Norris, Carolyn Yvonne. Greensboro 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Norwood, Carolyn English.. Raleigh 

Orr, Rowena Margaret Asheville 

Osborne, Martha Ann Asheville 

Owens, Mary Meade Charlotte 

Parker, Sarah Elizabeth. .Charlotte 

Patterson, Lena Rose Smithfleld 

Phipps, Nart Ferrell Wendell 

Pickard, Virginia Lee Greensboro 

Pitser, Margaret Lee Raleigh 

Polk, Betty Ruth Baltimore, Md. 

Pruitt, Margaret Page Louisburg 

Rackley, Elsie Margaret. Smithfield 

Radford, Barbara Jane New Bern 

Raines, 

Stella Karen Kings Mountain 

Raver, 

Mary Elizabeth Workman Cary 

Ray, Mary Anne Clinton, S. C. 

Reams, Jane Carol Warrenton 

Rees, Judith Appleton Charlotte 

Riggan, Jane Wyndham Littleton 

Rivers, 

Elizabeth Ann Camden, S. C. 

Rivers, Martha 

Redfeam Wadesboro 

Roberson, Clarene Frances.Hillsboro 

Roberts, Karen Ann Charlotte 

Russell, Charity Ann Denton 

Saintsing, 

Barbara North. Falls Church, Va. 

Senter, Penelope Ann Lillington 

Sessoms, Sandra Lee Apex 

Simms, Helen Florence Raleigh 

Smith, Brenda Margaret.New Bern 

Smith, Dollie Louisa Fayetteville 

Smith, Sally Anne Raleigh 

Smith, 

Sarah Frances Winston-Salem 



Sodeman, 

Betty Albert Rocky Mount 

Sours, 

Dorothy Llewellyn.Altavista, Va. 

Spencer, Nancy Jane Raleigh 

Stainback, Joyce Ellen New Bern 

Stallings, 

Christine Hardy Louisburg 

Stokes, Harriett Clay Hertford 

Stone, Judith McGill Greensboro 

Stovall, Annie Catherine Oxford 

Strickland, 

Margaret Moring Rocky Mount 

Tate, Jean Arthur Burlington 

Tate, Vina Elaine Mebane 

Thomas, Linda Frances Morven 

Tull, Bruce Brewer Rockingham 

Turner, Elizabeth Kay Raleigh 

Tutor, Peggy Laura Holly Springs 

Upchurch, Nancy Gayle Raleigh 

Ussery, 

Penelope Elizabeth Rockingham 

Wallace, Sandra Jean Charlotte 

Walter, Hannah Suellen Kinston 

Waters, Marguerite Ann. Greensboro 

White, Ann Gordon Warrenton 

White, Elizabeth Stiles. Bayside, Va. 
Whitehead, Ruby Christine. Tarboro 

Wicker, Judith Carole McCain 

Wiggs, Adalia Jean Smithfield 

Wilkerson, Francine Gail Raleigh 

Williams, Patricia Jane.Kannapolis 
Willis, Martha Jane._Rutherfordton 

Wilson, Glenda Ann Statesville 

Wilson, Mary Elizabeth.Thomasville 

Winfield, Mary Virginia Pinetown 

Wood, 

Sophia Elizabeth Clemson, S. C. 

Worrell, Jane Raye Rutherfordton 



Freshmen 



Abraham, 

Lynrt Virginia Alexandria, Va. 

Adams, Jessica L^-nn Smithfield 

Adams, Judith Ann Benson 

Adkins, Elva Mae Fieldale, Va. 

Ainsley, Mary Ann Ahoskie 

Akkoc, 

Canan Hatice Istanbul, Turkey 

Allcott, 

Mary Virden Glen Allen, Va. 

Allen, Gloria Elairte Benson 

Andrews, Carol Vaughn Roseboro 

Archer, Mildred Susan Charlotte 

Arledge, 

Linda Lee Hendersonville 



Armstrong, Nancy Amelia. -Belmont 

Autry, Corina Faye Bunnlevel 

Bain, Sharon Lynn..Winstort-Salem 
Baird, Norma Lucretia..Lumberton 

Baker, Alice Faye Snow Hill 

Barbour, 

Sylvia Gray Willow Springs 

Earnhardt, 

Sarah Bette Winston-Salem 

Beard, Margaret Ann. .Fayetteville 
Beck, FYances Dianne-.Thomasville 

Berry, Patricia Ann Drexel 

Blackwelder, 

Alma Frartkie Burlington 



BEGISTEB OF STUDENTS 



89 



Bolton, 

Johnnie Claire Rocky Mount 

Bostic, Emilie Jean Asheville 

Boyd. Sherron Winstead Wilson 

Bradshaw, 

Carol Bea Bluffton, S. C. 

Bragassa, Ann Natalie Gary 

Bragg, Barbara Kathryn Monroe 

Bragg, Sally Bailey Oxford 

Branon, Martha Carolyn. .Charlotte 

Bridgers, Glenda Kay Smithfield 

Britt, Mary Anrt Smithfield 

Britt, 

Sandra Curtis Lumber Bridge 

Britton, Nell Cynthia Seaboard 

Brock, Ann Ophelia Bailey 

Brookshire, Barbara Ann Winton 

Brown, Glenda Lucile Wilmington 

Buffaloe, Nancy Jean Raleigh 

Buffaloe, Nancy Sue Raleigh 

Bullard, Elizabeth Aifn Wallace 

Bullock, Dorothy Jane Wilson 

Bullock, Sylvia Gardner Bethel 

Burgess, Charlotte Ann Shiloh 

Burroughs, 

Dorothy Ann Red Springs 

Butler, Hilda Faye Raleigh 

Butler, Julia Vann Elizabethtown 

Cannon, Alice Mae Greenville 

Carawan, Zona Dare Harrells 

Carraway, 

AniTe Taylor Norfolk, Va. 

Carver, 

Sarah Louise Roanoke Rapids 

Chewning, 

Beverly Jean Wadesboro 

Chow, Verona 

Wen Lung Kowloon, Hong Kong 

Coffey. Eleanor Louise. Wake Forest 

Cole, Betty Jean Oxford 

Cornelius, 

Judy Anne Mooresville 

Cox, Nell Jennirtgs Burlington 

Craft, Sandra Kaye. Winston-Salem 

Craig, Nancy Helen Windsor 

Graver, Connie Rebecca Welcome 

Creech, Bonnie Sue Smithfield 

Crouch, Judith Elizabeth Raleigh 

Cullen, Donna Kaye Charlotte 

Currin, Mary Kli/aheth Oxford 

Dean, Sandra Helerf Selma 

Deane, Elizabeth Anne Gary 

Denson, 

Margaret Elizabeth. Rlitherfordton 

Dildny, AUio Jane Ahoskie 

Dobbins, Mary Ruth _ Winston-Salem 

Drake, Barbara Diane Charlotte 

Dull, 

Adrianne Donna .-Winston-Salem 



Dunn, Marie Hope Pinetops 

Dwiggins, Judith Carol Gary 

Eaton, Jane Lull Asheville 

Echerd, Elizabeth Ann Charlotte 

Edwards, Alma Jane Goldsboro 

Edv;ards, Ellen Kaye Fayetteville 

Elliott, 

Judyth Ann Kingsport, Teifti. 

Ellis, Betty Jo Siler City 

Ernst, 

Bettie Jane. .East Granby, Conn. 
Evans, 

Martha Louise Norfolk, Va. 

Faulk, 

Virginia Katherine Smithfield 

Fayed, Wadad Roanoke Rapids 

Finan, Mary Pauline Raleigh 

Fisher, Carla Bonita Asheville 

Fisher, Judith Ann..Richmorfd, Va. 

Ford, Nancy Sue Canton 

Freeman, Brenda Kay Robbins 

Frye, Dorothy Susan.Athens, Tenn. 

Furr, Georgia Louise Albemarle 

Garrett, 

Frartces Celeste Henderson 

Garrett, 

Nancy Elizabeth Henderson 

Garvey, Betty Gower Clayton 

Godwin, Hannah Patricia Selma 

Goodson, Lynn Marie Horse Shoe 

Goodwin, Rita Sue Alexandria, Va. 

Green, Laura Stella. Greenville, S. C. 
Griffin, Judith Kay. Winston-Salem 

Griffin, Lina Diane Albemarle 

Gruver, Ellen Jane. Columbus, Ohio 

Hagwood, Susan Lynne Bunn 

Hall, Ellen Kay Durham 

Hall, Patricia Blair Graham 

Harris, Linda Jean Durham 

Hartness, Evelyn Crystal. Henderson 

Hartsell, Billie Anne Jonesvillo 

Hatley, Nancy Jane Oakboro 

Haverstock, 

Doifna Aline Roanoke Rapids 

Haynes, 

Rebecca Lou.Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Haywood, Kathryn Earl >. -Durham 
Hendricks, Jane Bettina..Nash%-ille 

Hioks, Peggy West Raleigh 

Hines, .lanet Louise Charlotte 

Hinson, Helen Pope Kinston 

Hoffler, Edna Louise Sunbiiry 

Holland, Elizabeth Jane.Lumberton 

Holliday, Carolyn Louise Raleigh 

Holmes, Larfa Jeanene Raleigh 

House, Martha Andrews Monroe 

Howard, Sarnh Cnmminps. .Raleigh 
Howell, Carolyn Elizabeth. .Weldon 



90 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Hunt, Patricia Nileen Raleigh 

Hutcherson, 

Nancy Jean Winston-Salem 

Ipock, Betty Hart New Bern 

Ishy, Jeanne Estelle Burlington 

Isley, Sally Gayle Burlingtort 

Jackson, Jo Carolyn Goldsboro 

Johnson, Norma Elaine Windsor 

Johnson, Rebecca Sue Clinton 

Jones, Nancy Lou Lewiston 

Joyce, Elizabeth Gail Madison 

Keen, Judy Anne Goldsboro 

Kelly, Margaret Alice Raleigh 

Kerr, Margaret 

Derfnison HyattsviUe, Md. 

Kesler, Susan Ann-Kings Mountain 

Kinkead, 

Jacqueline Gail Rocky Mount 

Kirkpatrick, Betty Glyn Maxton 

Knott, Ruth Ann Henderson 

Koch, ,,. , 

Barbara Jean.N. Muskegon, Mich. 

Laitgdon, B&rbara Ann Angier 

Latham, Marcia Gentry Raleigh 

Lawhon, Betty Rae--Rutherfordton 

Lewis, Rebecca Anne Asheville 

Lilly, Lynda Anne Oxford 

Lipscomb, 

Beverley Lee Richmond, Va. 

Lloyd, Lillie Carol Durham 

McAdams, Annette Kinston 

McArthur, 

Martha McKinnon Laurinburg 

McCall, Pamela Jo Charlotte 

McCollum, Lois Elaine Madisort 

McCorkle, Ada Kay Fayetteville 

McKinnell, Beverly Anne.Charlotte 
McLoud, Jane Harriett.Elon College 
McRee, Patsy Lynn-Southern Pines 
Macomber, Priscilla Jane-Charlotte 
Marks, Eleanor Leroy. .Laurinburg 

Martin, Jerry Ann Jonesville 

Matherty, Janet Lutelle ClifFside 

May, Eleanor Carol Charlotte 

Melton, Virginia Ann Greenville 

Milazzo, Sammie Jean — Broadway 

Miller, , , ^ 

Martha Jan Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Mintz, Elizabeth Anne.Norfolk, Va. 
Moore, Mary Carolyn.- .Suffolk, Va. 

Mt. Castle, 

Kay Marie Newport News, Va. 

MuiTay, Faith Wheeler Burgaw 

Murray, . 

Patricia Lee.--Silver Spring, Md. 
Myers, Lynn Beth— -Winstort-Salem 



Nance, 

Susan Elizabeth Mt. Pleasant 

Niedringhaus, 

Judith CerroU Charlotte 

Norton, Donna Marie.— Dillon, S. C. 

Norton, Sara Jane Raleigh 

Osburn, Barbara Ann Tally-Raleigh 

Parker, Ruby Rebecca Goldsboro 

Parker, Sarah Frances Jackson 

Parrish, Margaret Jane... Charlotte 

P^y"^' , X, .J IT 

Peggy Marie. London Bridge, Va. 

pG3.rcG 

Johniiie LaRue Wake Forest 

Plliz'abeth Ann.Charleston, W. Va. 

Penney, Lura Anne Kenansville 

Penninger, Doris Ann.. -Lexington 

Petty, Brenda Carol Durham 

Phillips, Dartny Morehia 1. -Raleigh 

Pierce, Linda Sue Charlotte 

Pinner, Diane Elizabeth Concord 

Pittard, Pen Lile Taylorsville 

Plyler 

Martha Blanchard-Whaleyville, Va. 

Poole, Anne Pepper Kinston 

Potter, Mary Lou Warsaw 

Price, Priscilla Watson Raleigh 

Proctor, . 

Tilley Adams Fuquay Springs 

Pugh, Janet Greensboro 

Purgason, 

Janice Elizabeth Greeifeboro 

Ratley, ^ , r, • 

Katherine Allison— -Red Springs 

Rawlinson, 
Nancy Bridgers— Southern Pines 

Reavis, „. , _ . . 

Elizabeth Lomax High Point 

Renegar, Alice Elaine Harmony 

Ridoutt, Sandra Hulan...New Bern 

Rogers, Emma Matthis Madison 

Rogers, „, ■ ... 

Patricia Hurst Statesville 

Rooks, Linda Mae Whiteville 

Rudd, Betty Kay Greertsboro 

Savage, Katie Corinne Willard 

Searcy, Sandra Louise. -Forest City 
Sheltcn, Brenda Nell— Gretna, Va. 
Sheppard, Linda Gail Canton 

Simmons, ,tt j v 

Margaret Rymer Wadesboro 

Smart, Cathy Ann Cliffside 

Smith, Alice Faye Pmk Hill 

Smith, 
Andra Katherine Norfolk, Va. 

Smith, Helen Earle New Bern 

Smith, 
Martha Elizabeth Greensboro 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



81 



Smith, Sarah Louise New Hill Thomas, Marion 

Speilce, Betty Carolyn.Eocky Mount Elizabeth Georgetown, S. C. 

Stafford, Tsioumas, Evangeline Kinston 

Brenda Jo Ann.. .Winston-Salem Tupper, Patricia Anne— Whiteville 

Stafford, Tyson, Carrie Eula Fayetteville 

Lessie Jean Elizabeth City Ussery, 

Stallings, Catherine Elizabeth Kannapolis 

Deborah Windsor.. .Rocky Mount Vestal, 

Steele, Betty Jo Statesville Catherine Elizabe+h Siler City 

Stevens Walker, Patricia Winston-Salem 

Ruth Carole Hopewell, Va. Wallace, DoniTa Katherine Raleigh 

Stone, Martha Susan.Richmond, Va. Ward, Laura Jane...... Goldsboro 

Straughan, Mabel Jane... .Warsaw Ward, Martha Ann.. Elizabeth City 

_. . , , , Watts, Mary Virginia Goldsboro 

btnckland, r. , t>t 4. Welch, Marion Elizabeth Moyock 

c^-'"??'^-^^T''^^?ru--T— ^°'^''y ^""""^ Wells. Sara Alice Atkinson 

Stricklartd, Judith Lee Erwin whatiev 

Surles, \Vanda Fay ^-^4"" Kathryn Elizabeth... Dillon, S. C. 

Swain, Linda Carole g^ eigh Whitfield, Clara Graham...Raleigh 

Swanson, Karen Ruth ... .Raleigh whitley, Nancy Clifton-.Vandemere 

Swayne, Lucinda Gertrude.Kinston dicker, Elizabeth Annette. ..Kenly 

Tankard, Williams, Roberta Gail Canton 

Josephine Nicholson .Washington Womble, Patricia Artn Lillington 

Taylor, Harriet Virginia. .Goldsboro Woodard, Mary Charlotte.Nashville 

Teachey, Woods, 

Delia Elizabeth Mattocks. Rose Hill Judith Elizabeth. Silver Spring, Md. 

Teachey, Sue Lyifn Rose Hill Young, Zuda Ellen Hickory 

Specials 



Alexander, Charles Edward. Raleigh 

Anderson, Edward James Raleigh 

Ashby, Genette DeWitt.Chapel Hill 

Ayscue, Mary Raleigh 

Barbour, Aubrey Elizabeth. Raleigh 

Barbour, Nancy Spence Raleigh 

Bartholomew, Joyce Lee Raleigh 

Bradley, Rebecca Martin Raleigh 

Britton, Margaret Dodd Raleigh 

Brown, Wilda Eskew Raleigh 

BufFaloe, Kathy Raleigh 

Byrd, Jane EUer Raleigh 

Coggins, Anna Katharine Raleigh 

Coggins, Frarfces Rebecca.. Raleigh 
Cunningham, Robert E., Jr.. Raleigh 

Daly, Marian F Clinton 

Davis, Donald Arthur Raleigh 

Davis, Vivian Vassar-.Youngsville 

Eckels, Alan Matthew Raleigh 

Enzor, Ruth Mae Raleigh 

Evans, Evelyn Call Raleigh 

Evans, Timothy Joe Raleigh 

Franklin, Kaye Raleigh 

Geoghegan, Ivey F Raleigh 

Gilbert, Lerta Bryan Raleigh 

Gussow, Olea Alexandra Raleigh 

Hathcock, Eloise Plyler Raleigh 

Hamilton, Thelma V Raleigh 

Irving, Donna Brooks Raleigh 



Johnson, Elfreda Barker Raleigh 

Kaufman, Ann Terry Raleigh 

Kroeger, Margaret Smart Raleigh 

Lake, Betsy Hurst Raleigh 

Lambert, John Garner 

Lee, Clodaph Burkhead Raleigh 

Long, Clyde Eugene Raleigh 

Martin, Betty Rader Gary 

Mason, Frances Winifred Raleigh 

Miller, JuaiTita Spears Raleigh 

Moore, Margaret Elizabeth. Raleigh 
Nolstad, Margaret Camilla. -Raleigh 

Norton, Dorothy Hill Raleigh 

Orders, Faye Felton Raleigh 

Patterson, Janice Capps Raleigh 

Peacock, .Julia Anne Raleigh 

Poole, Barbara Elizabeth Raleigh 

Reynolds, Eleanor Hunt A^ex 

Rose, Stephanie Raleigh 

Scott, Mary Ann Raleigh 

Small. June P-Iarie Raleigh 

Snead, Barbara Raleigh 

Speck, Susan Carol Raleicrh 

Tarleton, Allan Ray Raleigh 

Wang, Virgirria Li Raleigh 

White, Anne Walker Raleigh 

Wilkinson, 
Virginia Stephenson Raleigh 



92 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Summer Session, 1961 



Allen, Gloria Elaine Benson 

Anderson, 

Sandra Elizabeth Charlotte 

Austin, Phyllis Carmen—Four Oaks 
AvGrcttc 

Betty Glenrt Blackard Raleigh 

Barber, Rebecca 

Ann Wilson Elizabethtown 

Barnhardt, Ann Drucilla-- -Concord 

Barrett, Bryna Mildred Raleigh 

Bashford, Linda Ryan Raleigh 

Baugham, Mary Ogie Smithfield 

Beattie, Frances Mae Shelby 

Blanchard, Carolyn Denise-.Raleigh 

Brannort, Elizabeth Smith Cary 

Braswell, Phyllis Annette- -Zebulon 

Bridgers, Glenda Kay Smithfield 

Brunt, Henri Karl Fisher.-Raleigh 

Buffaloe, Edna E Raleigh 

BuUard, Eula Gladin Raleigh 

Bullard, Judith Ann-Baltimore, Md. 

BuTin, BrerJa Frances Zebulon 

Byrd, Jane Eller Raleigh 

Campbell, Sue Ellert Raleigh 

Carper, Lillie Suzannah Raleigh 

Cash, Sylvia Ann Rutherfordton 

Cheaves, Nancy Rose-.Spring Hope 
Christenbury, 

Patricia Ann Charlotte 

Clark, Daphne Joan__-Fieldale, Va. 

Clark, Joyce Nelson, Va. 

Cohoon, Patricia Ann Columbia 

Coley, Susanna Lirtthicum. -Raleigh 

Copeland, , t^ -j 

Mary Judith Roanoke Rapids 

Copley, Lynda Jean Durham 

Covington, „ , . , 

Teresa Antoinette. --Rockingham 
Craven, Martha Susanne-_-Sanford 

Creech, Bonnie Sue Smithfield 

Cromer, „, , „ 

Zemily Veronica Wake Forest 

Dail, ... 

Nartcy Elizabeth Mount Oilve 

Dameron, 

Dorothy Christian --.Franklinton 

Davis, Brenda Gail Ayden 

Dean, Phyllis Ann Raleigh 

de los Reyes, . 

Lydia Lantin--Laguna, Phillipines 

Dickey, Maria Kitchin Dunn 

Everett, Cynthia Jarvis-.-Hamiltort 

Fender, Ciayta Ann ^^P?^*5 

Gatlin, Lilmar Sue Raeford 

Gilbert, Lena Bryan ^Raleigh 

Glenn, Victoria Jane Durham 



Gravett, 

Katherine Painter- -Roanoke, Va. 

TJ n Q ^ 1 ^ 

Maxi'ne Ellingsworth Raleigh 

Hr.rper, Elfrieda Toepfer— Raleigh 

Evelyrt' Crystal Henderson 

Hege, Sonja Jean— -Winston-Salem 

Hicks, Carroll Ann Raleigh 

Hicks, lola Mae Oxford 

Hines, Reca Sanders Raleigh 

Holden, Nancy Fay Youngsville 

Holland, Tiny Sue Apex 

Holloway, Mary Ammons.— Raleigh 

Huff, Beverlye Ann Sanford 

Jackson, Mary Gladys--Fayetteville 

Jacksorf, Myra Stowe Louisburg 

Johnson, Betty Jo Benson 

Johnson, Elfreda Barker---Raleigh 
Johnson, Linda Kay Goldsboro 

Johnson, .„ ^ ,j 

Mamie Lou Roberts Smithfield 

Johnson, Ruth Ellen Goldsboro 

Johnston, Martha Dabney_ -Raleigh 

Kelly, Jane Wirtston Durham 

Kinlaw, Peggy Ann ?t^*?™ 

Knight, Frances Kay Ahoskie 

T ipkpv 

Suzanne Brickhouse Raleigh 

Latham, Linda Claire Raleigh 

Lawrence, Jane Elizabeth.Colerain 
Leggett, Patricia Anne.--Asheboro 

Sara Louise Arlington, Va. 

McCombs, Dorothy Foster- -Raleigh 

McFall, Julia Annette Madisort 

McGuire, Alice Josephine Sylva 

McGuirt, Margaret Neal Monroe 

Makepeace, Kitty Clyde Sanford 

Martin, Peggy Joan Belmont 

Meek 

Mary Nancy Claytor-Franklinton 

Milam, Mary Lasley S^l^-^t 

Moore, Janice Belford ^^tS'"|J 

Morgan, Mary Louise Oxford 

Morris, „ , t, -j 

Derith Loraine, -Roanoke Rapids 
Morrow, Sara Elizabeth.Morganton 

Moselev, Shirley Dixort -.,^^°^'i 

Moss, Ruth Avery :^, ?°? 

Motlev, Margaret Aiken Raleigh 

Motley, Paula Faye Raleigh 

Murray, „■,,■, 

Elizabeth Gertrude Goldsboro 

Nagel, Donald Charles Cary 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



93 



Nash, Sylvia Angel Raleigh 

Newton, Ruby Gail Kenansville 

Nicholds, Carolyn Faye Albemarle 

Nolstad, Margaret Camilla. Raleigh 
Osborne, 

Joyce Ann Mouth of Wilson, Va. 

Parker, Mary Elizabeth Raleigh 

Patton, Mildred Ann Canton 

Payrfe, 

Peggy Marie_London Bridge, Va. 

Pearce, Elsie Young Wake Forest 

Peedin, Freddie Selma 

Peek, Blanche Marie Raleigh 

Peterson, Mary Susan Raleigh 

Phillips, 

Nancy Louise Roanoke Rapids 

Pickard, Virginia Lee Greensboro 

Pitser, Margaret Lee Raleigh 

Pittman, Mary Virginia Irby--Cary 

Poole, Anne Pepper Kinston 

Potter, Alice Cooper Raleigh 

Proctor, 

Elizabeth Rosalyn Dupree_Raleigh 

Pruitt, Kathryrf Shaw Raleigh 

Rankin, Edith Elizabeth Raleigh 

Robinson, Polly Anna Raleigh 

Rose, Sylvia Delyghte Snow Hill 



Sanderlin, 

Sue Blount Weathers Raleigh 

Sanders, Ann Carol Four Oaks 

Scoggin, Anne Viser Louisburg 

Shearon, 

Dorothy Carter Franklirrton 

Sledge, Elizabeth Anne._Whiteville 

Sloan, Patsy Ann Raleigh 

Smith, Marsha Paulette Gary 

Stephens, Nancy Hercelia.-Raleigh 

Stovall, Annie Catherine Oxford 

Sykes, Eloise Edwards Raleigh 

Tew, Jean Butler Salemburg 

Timberlake, Jane Griffin George 

Upchurch, 

Josephine Morgan Raleigh 

Vinirfg, Julia Anne Garner 

Walker, Barbara Ann Snowden 

Walston, Frances Ruth Siler City 

Walter, Hannah Suellen Kinston 

Watson, 

Elizabeth Cleveland Raleigh 

Wiggs, Adalia Jean Smithfield 

Wolfe, Mary Ann Burgaw 

Wood, Betsy Barbour Bensort 



Summary of Students 

Seniors 193 

Juniors 129 

Sophomores 182 

Freshmen --252 

Total Classmen 756 

Special Students — 66 

812 

Summer School Students 136 

948 
91 



Less (For Duplication) 



Net Enrollment 867 

Net Enrollment by States and Foreig^n Countries 



Alabama 1 

Connecticut 2 

Florida 1 

Georgia 1 

Kentucky 1 

Maryland 8 

Massachusetts 1 

Michigan 1 

New Jersey 1 

New York 1 

North Carolina 762 



Ohio 1 

Pennsylvania 1 

South Carolina 15 

Tennessee 3 

Virginia 48 

West Virginia 2 

• * * 

Bolivia 1 

Egypt 1 

Hong Kong 1 

Philip<)ines 2 

Taiwarf 1 

Turkey 1 



INDEX 



Academic Regulations 30 

Administration 8 

Admission 26, 28 

Advanced Standing 28 

Alumnae Association, Officers of 14 

Art 41 

Athletic Association 20 

Attendance, Class 35 

Baptist Student Union 18 
Biology 43 
Buildings 15 
Business 45 

Calendar 5 

Calendar, College 6 

Certificates. N. C. 50, 51 

Chapel 17 

Chemistry 48 

Chorus 19, 72 

Church Music 67 

Classiflcation 38 

Clubs, Departmental 18 

Committees, Faculty and Staff 13 

Concerts 68 

Courses of Instruction 41 

Dean's List 37 
Degree, Bachelor of Arts 30 
Degree, Bachelor of Music 33, 68 
Degree Requirements 30 
Degrees Conferred, 1961 80 
Dormitories 15 

Early Decision Plan 27 
Economics 47 
Education 49 
Eligibility 37 
English 54 

Entrance Examination 27 
Entrance Units 26 
Examinations 38 
Expenses 21 

Faculty 9 

Foreign Languages 56 
Foundation 15 
French 56 
Freshman Tear 33 

Geography 79 
German 57 
Grading System 36 
Graduation with Distinction 37 
Greek 57 

Health 17 

Health Education 59 

History 61 

Home Economics 63 

Home Management House 16, 65 



Infirmary 16, 17 

Kappa Nu Sigma 18 

Latirt 58 
Library 16 
Loan Funds 24 
Location 15 

Mathematics 65 

Music 66 

Music Education 67 

Organ 73 
Orientation 29 

Part-Time Students 29 

Philosophy 76 

Physical Education 59, 60 

Physics 49 

Piano 73 

Political Science 63 

Psychology 75 

Publications 19 

Purpose 4 

Quality Points 36 

Eendmission, Former Students 29 

Recitals, Student 68 

Recognition 4 

Refunds 21, 22 

Registration 29, 33 

Regulations Concerning Courses 83 

Religion 76 

Religious Life 16 

Religious Organizations 18 

Reports 38 

Residence 17 

Retention of Students 38 

Scholarships 23 

Self-Help 25 

Silver Shield 19 

Societies, Literary 19 

Sociology 78 \ 

Spanish 58 ; 

Special Students 29 

Speech 55 

Student Government Association 18 

Student Organizations 18-19 

Students, Register of 83 

Students, Special and Part-Time 29 

Summer Session 25, 40 

Teacher's Certificates 50, 51 
Trustees, Board of 7 

Violin 74 

Vocational Preparation 39 

Voice 74 

Withdrawal 40 



(94) 




MEREDITH COLLEGE 

The purpose of Meredith College is to develop in its students the Christian attitude toward the whole of life, and lo prepare ihem 
for inlellieenl citizenship, homemaking. graduate study, and for professional and other fields of service, its intention is to provide 
nol only thorough instruction, but also culture made perfect througli the religion of Jesus Christ. These ideals of academic in- 
tegrity and religious influence have always been cherished at Meredith. 




Netv Dormitory Completed in 1962 



tfUMl 



mbAm 



Admission Requirements For Freshmen 1. Each student applying for admission from a secondary school must rank 
in the upper half of her graduating class. It is to be noted that three-fourths of the current freshman class ranked in the upper 
quarter of their graduating classes. 
2. High school graduates must offer a minimum of sixteen units of credit, distributed as follows: 



English 

Language, history, social studies, 
mathematics, and natural science 
{If a foreign language is offered, 
at least two units in the language 
must be presented.) 



Number of Units 
4 



Numbe 



of Units 



Additional units from these subjects 
or from electives approved by 
Meredith College 

MINIMUM TOTAL 



16 



Early Decision Plan 

For the unquestionably well-qualified student who definitely 
desires to enter Meredith College there is designed an Early 
Decision Plan. Under this plan the applicant must take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board before her senior year in high school. She should file 
application for admission to the College by September 15 of 
her senior year, requesting in an accompanying letter that her 
application receive an "early decision" and certifying that she 
is, therefore, applying only to Meredith. On the basis of junior 
year test scores, the applicant's three-year high school record, 
together with a notice of courses being pursued in the senior 
year and recommendations from school officials, the admissions 
officer will accept the qualified applicant by October 15 of her 
senior year. Dormitory students will be requested to make an 
advance payment of 850,00 by November 15. This advance 
payment is not refundable. 



library, and in various offices and academic departments of the 
college. Compensation, which varies with the character and 
amount of service rendered, usually ranges from S125 to S250 
for the year. Initial correspondence concerning appointments 
may be addressed to the President or to the Business Manager. 



National Defense Student Loan Program 

Meredith College participates in the National Defense Stu- 
dent Loan Program. Information about this loan fund is avail- 
able from high school principals and guidance directors. 
Interested students should write Mr. V. H. Belcher, Business 
Manager and Treasurer, Meredith College. 



3. All applicants are expected to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board, and the Writing 
Sample given as part of the afternoon tests. Applicants for Meredith are urged to complete these tests in December or January. 



College Board Examinations 

For 1962-63 the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board will be given for a fee of S5 at 
several centers in each state during the morning on the follow- 
ing dates: 
Saturday, December 1, 1962 Saturday, March 2, 1963 
Saturday, January 12, 1963 Saturday, May 18, 1963 
Wednesday, August 14, 1963 

An English essay exercise, knoivn as the Writing Sample, 
has been scheduled for all the College Board's testing dates. 
The Writing Sample may be taken in the afternoon either 
separately from the Achievement Tests, at fee of S2, or in place 
of one of the three Achievement Tests to which candidates are 



entitled for the S6 fee. (Applicants to Meredith are not re- 
quired to take the Achievement Tests.) 

Students should consult tlie Meredith catalogue or their high 
school principals or guidance directors for information con- 
cerning the procedure for taking these College Board Examina- 
tions. 

Considerations For Admission 

Scores made on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, the student's 
Writing Sample, her total high school record, including her 
rank in graduating class and the recommendations of school 
officials, are all considered in determining the applicant's quali- 
fications for admission. 



Expenses For 1962-63 

For resident students 

Tuition: instruction, library, lectures and 

recitals, academic administration 
Residence: room and board, laundry, in- 
firmary service, maintenance 

Total 
For non-resident students 
Tuition (as above) 



S 620.00 

630.00 
§1,250.00 



S 620.00 
Special fees for instruction in music and horseback riding 
re listed in the catalogue. 



Self-Help 

Many students needing financial assistance reduce their ex- 
penses by part-time employment in the dining hall, in the 



Scholarships 

Freshman Scholarsliips: Fifteen scholarships, valued at S400 
each, and thirty scholarships valued at S250 each, are awarded 
to resident members of the incoming freshman class on the 
basis of outstanding scholastic achievement and promise, 
qualities of social leadership, and financial need. 

The freshman applicant who feels qualified and desires to 
he considered as a scholarship recipient should address a re- 
quest directly lo President Carlyle Campbell, Meredith College, 
to acconqjany or follow the application for admission. There 
are no formal application blanks or competitive examinations 
used in applying for one of these awards. The same credentials 
that are used in evaluating the applicant's qualifications for 
admission are used by the Scholarship Committee in making 
the awards. 

Upper-Class Scholarships: Thirty scholarships, valued at 
S25() each, are awarded to resident members of the sopho- 
more, junior, and senior classes on the basis staled above. 





Meredith College is a meMber oj the Southern Association 

oj Colleges and Secondary Schools and the Association of 

American Colleges. Graduates oj Meredith are 

eligible for membership in the American Association 

oj University Women. Meredith College is a liberal arts 

member o\ the National Association of Schools oj Music. 





Meredith College, founded by tlie North Carolina Baptist 
Convention, was granted a charter in 1891, and was first opened 
to students in September, 1899. It was chartered as the Baptist 
Female University, a name changed in 1905 to Meredith Col- 
lege. This last name was given in honor of Thomas Meredith, 
for many years a recognized leader of the Baptist denomina- 
tion in North Carolina, who in 1838 presented to the Baptist 
Stale Convention a resolution urging the establishment in or 
near Raleigh of "a female seminary of high order that should 
be modeled and conducted on strictly religious principles, but 
that should be, so far as possible, free from sectarian influ- 
ences." The institution has had four presidents: James Carter 
Blasingame, 1899-1900; Richard Tilman Vann, 1900-1915; 
Charles Edward Brewer, 1915-1939; Carlyle Campbell, 1939- 
Meredith's resident enrollment is currently 730. 

Advantages Offered Students 

Many opportunities for all students to participate in 
activities . . , 

Close relationship of teacher and student in small classes and 
in the college community . , . 

A liberal education as preparation for a full life . . . 

Religion as a part of everyday life , . . 

Capital City location within Intellectual Triangle formed by 
North Carolina Slate College at Raleigh, the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Duke University at Dur- 



Equipment 

170-acre campus . . . 

Attractive quadrangle composed of administration building 
and library, four dormitories, and dining hall . . . 

Auditorium with seating capacity of 1,050 . . . 

New classroom building for liberal arts, costing 8385,000 . . . 

New classroom building for sciences, costing §550,000 . . . 

New home management house, costing 862,000 . . . 

New dormitory accommodating 100 students, costing S485,- 

New 32.bed infirmary, costing 8265,000 . . . 
A "Hut," for informal social activities . . . 
An outdoor swimming pool . . . 
A riding academy with 40 horses . . . 

Course of Study For Freshmen 

Usually freshmen register for the following courses: English 
1-2; Health Education 1-2; Physical Education 1-2; a foreign 
language; plus three courses chosen from history, religion 
mathematics, or the natural sciences. Some variation from this 
schedule IS necessary for students planning to major in art, 
home economics, or music. 



Major Field 

After two years of taking basic liberal arts courses at Mere- 
dith a student chooses a major field from the following: 
Art; Biology; Business; Chemistry; Economics; Ele- 
menlary Education; English; History; Home Econ- 
omics; Mathematics; Modem Languages — French 
Spanish; Music— Church Music, Organ, Piano, School 
Music, Violin, Voice; Psychology; Religion; Soci- 
ology. 




IV J 





.;i-^' fe M a 1 il'^f M^P 1 




A GUIDE TO GIVING 



m 



IN^I 



Meredith College... 

niusl find ways and means for keeping its Ijuild- 
ings and otliei faciiilies iip-to-dale and adequate 
for the needs of one-tlioiisand young women wlio 
seek comfortable living quarters and pleasant sur- 
roundings as a part of tlie necessities involved in 
the pursuit of an excellent education. We must 
also maintain a faculty of unquestioned character, 
ability, and devotion to the high purposes of Chris- 
tian education, Scliolarsbip resources for capable 
students who find it impossible to enter and re- 
main bere without financial assistance is also a 
necessity. It all adds up to an obligation to keep 
you informed about ways of having an important 
part in the ongoing of this high enterprise. 



... is the most common type of gift. You may 
realize deductions up to 30% for Federal income 
tax purposes. 



BWiHiJMIWWj 



. . . gifts and other types of property are also 
tax deductible. The amount of your gift is the 
fair market value of the property at the time the 
gift is made, or the date of postmark. 

If the value of your gift bas appreciated since 
you acquired it, you do not have to pay a capital 
gains tax on tbe difference between the price you 



paid for it and the value of tbe property at the 
time you give it to Meredith, On the other hand, 
if you own stock whose value has decreased, you 
will benefit by selling the stock and giving tbe 
proceeds to Meredith. You will then receive a 
capital loss deduction and a charitable deduction, 
whereas if you gave the stock directly to Meredith, 
you would obtain only the charitable deduction. 



^^^pfRRRHBEIR^ffl^H 



. . . should be considered if you plan to leave a 
gift to Meredith by bequest. There are tax ad- 
vantages in making sucli gifts during your life- 
time and, at the same time, you enjoy tbe income 
therefrom. The charitable deduction in these 
cases increases your spendable income after taxes. 

1. Property may he given to Meredith under an 
arrangement whereby tbe College agrees to pay 
you annually during your lifetime a percentage 
of its value equal to the average rale of return 
received on all the College's investments. This 
arrangement will effect an inmiediate income tax 
deduction, as well as a deduction in your estate 
for Federal estate tax purposes. Your age and 
value of your property will determine the amouTit 
of the income tax deduction. If the amount of 
the charitable gift exceeds the maximum char- 
itable deduction to which you are entitled, you 
can spread ibe gift over two or more years so 
tbe permissible deduction would not be exceeded 
in any one year. 

The income received each year by you would 
be includable in the Federal income tax return, 
but would, initially, be offset by the charitable 
deduction. Your estate would not pay any Federal 
estate tax on tbe properly turned over to Meredith. 

2. If yoti prefer to receive tbe income from 
your individual property rather than a portion of 
the income derived from Meredith's general en- 



dowmeiit funds, you may do so, and still receive 
the tax advantages cited in the previous paragraph. 
This could he accomplished by creating an irre- 
vocable trust of the property you want to give to 
the College. In the trust instruments, provision 
would be made for the income during your life- 
time and the principal would tlien go to Meredith. 
Generally, the income of such a trust is includable 
in your Federal income tax return (except to the 
extent that il may be derived from tax-exempt 
securities as noted in the next section). 

3. You can obtain all the tax savings mentioned 
above and at the same time pay no income tax 
on the trust income to the extent tlie trust income 
is derived from interest on tax-exempt slate or 
municipal lionds. Also, the trust may sell the trust 
inveslmenls at a profit without incurring a capital 
gains tax. 

4. Under the annuity plan, you again are able 
to make a gift to Meredith and receive income 
for life. In this case you give cash or property 
to the College in return for its agreement to pay 
you a fixed amount each year for life. Income 
tax-wise, you are treated as having made a char- 
itable contribution etpial to the excess, if any, of 
the value of the property given over the cost of a 
simitar annuity purchased from a life insurance 
company. The annual payments are treated as an 
ordinary annuity in ibat a part of tlie annual pay- 
ment is tax-exempt, as return of principal, and 
the balance is taxable income. The poi^tion of each 
annual payment that you receive tax-free is deter- 
mined by dividing the "cost" of the contract {the 
value of the property given to Meredith less the 
charitable deduction, if any, you are allowed) by 
the number of years of your life expectancy at 
the dale the property is transferred to the College. 

5. In previous methods cited it is possible for 
you to provide life income for others as well as 
yourself, allbough in doing so you must consider 
the impact of the gift tax taws. In all such cases 
the amount of charilal)le deduction is computed 
on the basis of the life expectancies of your va- 
rious beneficiaries. 



■i<^ ^ 



. . . sometimes called the Two-Year Charitable 
Trust, can be advantageous to the tax payer who, 
for some reason, wishes to make gifts to charities 
which will exceed his maximum permissible in- 
come deductions. For example, if you are a mar- 
ried man with a net taxable income of S36,000, 
after exemptions and deductions, including tlie 
maximum allowable charitable deduction, and you 
want to donate S4,000 a year for two years to the 
Meredith College Expansion Program, you could 
place in trust income-producing property which 
would provide an annual income of S4,000. You 
would specify in the Deed of Trust that the income 
would be paid to Meredith for two years, after 
which the principal will revert to you. This 
method would reduce your taxable income from 
S36,000 to §32,000. This type of trust will give 
you unlimited charitable deductions in exchange 
for placing the income-producing property in trust 
for a minimum of two years. 



imisfflp 



... is also a means of giving to Meredith. The 
proceeds of insurance payable to the College are 
not subject to Federal estate taxes. Gifts through 
life insurance may also provide income tax de- 
ductions. If you assign your policy absolutely to 
Meredith, the annual premium is deductible for 
income tax purposes. Usually, life insurance pro- 
grams are set up to protect your dependents. As 
other assets grow and your dependents become 
less dependent, you may wish to assign some out- 
standing life insurance to a worthy cause such as 
scholarships. 



. . . indicate that "where there's a will there's a 
way" of expressing your intention that Meredith 
benefit by your estate, and there's no limitation 
on the deduction for estate tax purposes of gifts 
you make to the College by this method. Here 
are some types of gifts by will: 

1. An outiight gift to the College of a fixed dol- 
lar amount, or of property in kind, such as stocks, 
bonds, real estate . . . , is deductible for Federal 
estate tax purposes, if property is given in kind. 
the amount of the deduction is the fair market 
value of the property at the date of death. 

2. If you wish to give part of your estate to 
Meredith but want to provide for your wife and 
others to receive the income for life, this can be 
done through a trust or amniity arrangement. 



Jjg^ 



INTINGENT GIFTS 



. . . should be considered if you would like to 
make a bequest to Meredith but feel that your 
primary obligation to your family or dependents 
prevents it. Your will may provide that if primary 
beneficiaries of your estate should pre-decease 
you or die before a trust fund is completely used, 
the property shall go to Meredith College. 



The Tenth Annual 

Meredith School 

of 
Christian Studies 



Purpose: To bring thoughtful ministers and laymen 
together in study and discussion with leaders who are 
making major, scholarly contributions to Christian life 
and thought. 



June 18-22, 1962 
Moiiilay. 8 p.iii. — Friday, 1 p.m. 



The Program Committee acknowledges with grati- 
tude the generous contributions of interested friends in 
providing for the educational expense of the School. 



PROGRAM COMMITTEE 



Ralph E. McLain, Chairman; Head of Deparlnient of 
Religion, Meredith College 

Olin T. BiNKLEY, Dean, Southeastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary 

Carlyle Campbell. President, Meredith College' 

Harold J. Dudley, Executive Secretary, North Caro- 
lina Presbyterian Synod 

Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh, North Carolina 

Richard H. Baker, Bishop of Episcopal Diocese of 
North Carolina 

Carlton S. Prickett, Minister. First Baptist Church, 
Burlington 



General Information 



Location: Meredith College is located on Routes 1 and 
64 at the western city limits of Raleigh on Hills- 
boro Street. Lectures will be held in the College 
Auditorium. 

Rooms: One section of Meredith dormitories will be 
arranged for four men to share a two-room suite 
with connecting bath. Another section of Meredith 
dormitories will be arranged for four women to 
share a two-room suite with connecting bath. 
There will be a section of suites available for hus- 
bands and wives. 

All rooms are furnished with linen, towels, and 
soap. 

Meals: All meals will be served in the College Dining 
Hall. The lirst meal will be served at 5:30 p.m., 
Monday, and the last meal at 1:00 p.m., Friday. 

Book Display: Through the courtesy of the Baptist 
Book Store of Raleigh, there will be a book ex- 
hibit in the Auditorium Building where books 
may be purchased. 

Recreation: A wide variety of recreation opportunities 
will be available: horseback riding, swimming, 
tennis, golf at nearby courses, softball. 

Fees: Through the contribution of interested friends 
there will be no fee for the lecture courses. Room 
and board fees are: 

Room and meats per person for 

entire session $15.00 

Single meals 75 

Room for one night 2.00 

Note: Arrangements for single meals and rooms 
for overnight accommodations may be made 
in advance at the Information Table. 

For reservations and further informadon use at- 
tached application blank and mail to: 

Meredith School of Christian Studies 

Meredith College 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



s/a 



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bu 



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MEREDITH SCHOOL OF CHRISTIAN STUDIES 



DAILY CALENDAR 

7:15- 8:00 Breakfast 

9:00-10:00 Dr. Michaison 

10:00-10:30 Refresbmenls 

10^30-11:30 Dr. Hasclden 

11:-I5.12:45 Dr. Anderson 

1 :0U- 1:30 Lunch 

2:00- 3:00 __ Informal Discussion 

3:00- 5:30 Recreation; Room 

5:30- 6:1S Dinner 

8:00- 9:00 Evening Lectures 

Monday Dr. Michalson 

Tuesday Dr. Anderson 

Wednesday Dr. Haselden 

Thursday Dr. Michalson 




ished his Pli.D i 



CARL MICHALSON 
Projeisor Drew Tlwulogical Seminary 

"Exislentiatism" has become one 
of Ihe popular, problem words of 
our lime. What does it mean — 
for Ihe literary man, for Ihe atheist, 
for the theoloeian. for the Chris- 

To discuss the meaning of this 
problem vvorJ, Dr. Carl Michalson 
lirings a competence developed 
from many years of teaching sys- 
lemalic theology, and from special 
research in Europe during the past 
two years al the University of 
Strassbourg. Dr. Michalson is a 
I native of Minnesota, and, after re- 
_ ceivinj! B.D. and M.A, degrees at 

Drew Theological Seminary, iin- 
1950 al Vale University. He has taught 
sysicmalic Ihcology al Drew since 1943, and has been visiting 
professor al Perkins School of Theology, Tokyo Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, am! Aoyama Gakuin University in Japan. 

His books include The Wiliiess of KierkcftnnnI (1960), 
Japanese Coniribiitioiis to Christian Thvologv (1960), The 
Hinse ol Hhlory (1959), Faiih for Personal Crisis (1958). He 
edited Chnsiinnilv anil rlic Existcnliiilists and conlribuled the 
chapter '■What is Exisieutialism?" (1956). 
Theme: FAITH AND EXISTENCE 
Lectures: God: Hidden and Revealed 

Man: Alienaled and Reconciled 
Anxiely: Cosmic and Ontic 
Neighbor-Love: Privalc and Public 
Evening: Monday, What is Existentialism? 

Thursday, What is Demylhologizing? 

KYLE HASELDEN 
Professor, University of Chicago 

Born in Lalta, South Carolina 
Dr. Kyle Haselden has served in 
many capacities as Baplisl minister 
editor, lecturer and author. After 
receiving his A.B. degree at Fur- 
man University, he look his B.D. 
degree at Colgate Rochester Di- 
vinity School, and in recent years 
has had both the Doctor of Di- 
vinity and the Doctor of Laws 
degrees conferred upon him. In 
1958 he delivered the Rauschen- 
busch Lectures at Colgate Roches- 
ler Divinity School. At present he 
is editor of the Palpii magazine and 
is Managing editor of The Chris- 
lion Centiirv. He also serves as 
Professor of Homilelics at Ihe Federated Theoloeical Faculty 
Univcr.siiy of Chicago. 

Dr. Hasclden brings his background of both church and 
school experience to bear on the interpretation of his ex- 
perience as an official delegate to the recent New Delhi meet- 
ing of Ihe Worid Council of Churches. Besides his many contri- 
butions to religious journals, Dr. Haselden is the author of 
The Racial Prohlein in Christian Perspective (1959). 
Theme: The View from New Delhi 
Lectures: The Eastward Shift and Ihe New Alignments 
The World Council's Unresolved Issues 
Chirstian Unity and Racial Division 
The Distance from Rome to Geneva 
Evening: Ordinary People; Extraordinary Claims 




HUGH ANDERSON 

l'roji:\sor, Duke Universiiy 

Out of a great Scottish tradi- 
tion Dr. Hugh Anderson combines 
both high scholarship and clear 
communication that accompanies 
Scottish preaching at its best. 

Dr. Anderson received his higher 
education at the University of 
(Ihisgow and from 1951-57 he was 
minister of Trinity Church, Glas- 
;jow. He became Faulds Fellow in 
the Universiiy of Glasgow in 19'(4, 
and then seized a two year term 
as chaplain with the British Forces 
in Egypt and Palestine. On re- 
turning to Scotland he became As- 
^isIant to the Professor of Semitic 
languages in the University of 
the A. B. Bruce Lecturer in New 
Testament at Trinity College, Scotland. In that same year he 
came to America to become Professor of Biblical Theology 
at The Divinity School of Duke University where he now 
teaches. 

Publications by Dr. Anderson include Psalms l-XLI (1954) 
and The Historians of Israel (1961) besides various articles 
in British and American Periodicals. 

Theme: Studies in Biblical Theology 

Lectures: The Bible as Address 

Sacrifice — Man's Offering 
Prophecy — Man's Hope 

Fulfillment— Man's Victory in Christ 

Evening; The Book of Job. The Cross, and our Generation 




Glasgow. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Lecturers were asked to list their own publications 
and the books they recommend in relation to the lectures 
they will deliver. 

Dr. Anderson 

Rowley, H. H.. The Unity of the Bible 

Knight. G., A Christian Theology of the Old Testament 

Neil, Wm., The Rediscovery of the Bible 

Anderson, B., Rediscovering the Bible 

Wright, G.. The Book of the Acts of God 

Dr. Haselden 

Newbigen. J., A Faith for This One World 

New Delhi Speaks (official documents) 

Haselden, K., Racial Problem in Christian Perspective 

Dr. Michalson 

Kierkegaard. S., The Witness of Kierkegaard 

Barth. K,, The Faith of the Church 

Tillich. P., Dynamics of Failh 

Bultman, R., Existence and Faith 

Gogartcn. F.. The Reality of Truth 

Ebeling, G., Nature of the Christian Faith 

Michalson, C, Faith for Personal Crisis 

ibid.. The Hinge of History 

ibid.. Japanese Conlributions to Christian Theolog> 




MEREDITH 
COLLEGE 



EALEIGH, N. C. 







Siumiier Session 



JUNE 10 - JULY 20 
1963 




GENERAL INFORMATION 

Dormitory students should arrive in time to 
register on Monday, June 10. Registration will 
lie held in the College library, beginning at 
2 :00 p.m. Vnnn Dormitory will be used, but 
will not be open until 2 :00 p.m. on Sunday, 
June E). 

Upon arrival, students will register in the 
office of the Dean of Students in Johnson Hall 
before keys are issued by the House Director. 

High school graduates and transfer students 
who have been approved for admission to 
Meredith may complete certain required courses 
during the summer session. Students enrolled 
at other colleges should send in- advance a state- 
ment from a college oiTieial authorizing particular 
courses for ciedit at Meredith. 

During the six-week session a student may 
earn a maximum of sis semester hours of 
credit. 

Classes will meet from 7:45 a.m. to 1:00 
]t.ni., Monday fbrough Saturday, except July 

Tlio residence halls provide comfortable liv- 
ing quarters. Meals will be served in the Col- 
lege dining hall. Students Avill furnish their 
own towels and bed linen (for single beds) 
and make their own arrangements for laundry. 

Recreational and social programs and weekly 
round table discussions of current affairs are 
traditional. Buses leave frequently from the 
administration building to the business district, 
Tlie outdoor swimming pool will be available. 




CALENDAR 

June 9-10 Sunday and Monday — Dormi- 
tory students arrive before 2:00 
p.m. Monday 

June 10 Monday — Registration in library. 
2:00 p.m. 

June 11 Tuesday — Classes begin 

July 6 Saturday — Holiday 

July 19 Friday — Examinations 

July 20 Saturday — Summer session 
Commencement 




RECOGNITION 

Mereditb College, a standard four-year 
college for women, is a member of tbe 
Southei'n Association of Colleges and 
Schools, and tbe Association of American 
Colleges. Graduates of Meredith are 
eligible for membership in the American 
Association of University Women. Meredith 
is a Liberal Arts member of the National 
Association of Schools of Music. 



FACULTY AND STAFF 

Cahlylk CAjri'DELi., A.M., LL.D President 

Leisiiman a. Peacock, Pit.D Dean 

V. Howard Belcher, B.S JiiisinEss Manafjar 

Vera Tart Maksm Registrar 

Ma Belle Smith Denn of Shulmh 

Hazkl Baity, A.B. in L.S Librarian 

Lii.A Bkll, M.En EducuHon 

EuNEsT F. Canaday, Ph.D Mathematics 

Beunari) H. Cochran, Ph.D Religion- 

Harry E. Cooper, Mus-D., F.A.G.O Music 

Beatrk'k Donley, B.M Mxisic 

JA^[Es H. Eads, Jh., M.S Blologi/ 

Alice E. Ehhlicji, A.B Art 

Robert G. Pkacker, M.S Education 

Richard D. Goff, A.M History 

QuEKTiN 0. McAllister, Ph.D Spnnish 

Stuaut Pratt, Mcs.M Music 

Mary Lynch Johnson, Ph.D English 

Jean Swansok, Mus.M., P.A.G.O Music 

Leslie W. Syron, Vu.Ty...Sflciology & Gcogr(ij)hy 



EXPENSES 

General Fees: 

Tuition (for two courses, giving six 

semestci- liours of credit) $fl2.00 

Residenot! ; looiii and boiird fiO.OO 

Special Fees: 

Late rGgistratioii (after June 10) 3.00 

Tuition for special students, for cadi 

tlirce-liour course 46.00 

Piano, Organ, Voice (Two lialf-liour 

lessons a week) 4G.O0 

One halt-hour lesson a week 25.00 

Voice Class 30.00 

Use of piano, one hour daily 3.00 

For each additional hour 1.7.^» 

Use of organ, thirty-five or forty-five 

cents an hour. 

Fees arc payable upon registration. NO 
REFUNDS WILL BE ALLOWED FOR 
APITHDRAWALS. 



UMMER SESSION 

^tuie iO - ^iJ^ 20, f963 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The numlier in parentheses following ihe title of the course indicates 
the semester hours of credit allowed. The College does not guarantee 
to offer any course listed helow for which there is not a niinimiun 
registration of six students. The class schedule printed below is not 



necessarily final. If conflicts are apparent, please indicate preferences 
on iJie attached application form. Unless otherwise indicated, classes 
meet six days a week for one hour and fifteen minutes each. 



ART 
S31. An Appreciation (3). 



7:45 



A course designed to satisfy the need of 
general students for a key to the under- 
standing of art. Not open to art majors. 

Joyner 201 Mrs. Ehrlich 

y43. Beginning Art 9:05-11:40 

A course in the fundamentals of art for 
others than art majors. Consideration of 
the elements and principles of design and 
their application in problems involving 
various art media. 

Joyner 205 Mrs. Ehrlich 

BIOLOGY 
SI, S2. General Biology (3 or 6). 
Lecture SI — 7:45 Lecture S2 ~ 9:05 

Lab. SI Lah. S2 

10:25-1:00 10:25-1:00 

Mon. and Wed. Tues. and Tluur. 

A course presenting the most important 
biological facts and principles, and so re- 
lating them that the student can apply them 
to the ordinary affairs of life. A study of 
protoplasm, tlie cell, the role of green 
plants, including simple experiments in 
plant physiology, the adjustment of orga- 
nisms to their environment, and the struc- 
ture and functions of vertebrates with spe- 
cial reference to man, constitutes the work 
of the first part. In S2 a study of typical 
jinimal and plant forms is made as an intro- 
duction to these two kingdoms. Students 
may register for either half of the course, 
or for six hours. 

Himter Hall Mr. Bads 

EDUCATION 
S.HL Educational Pay choloi^y (3). 9:05 

A course intended to be basic to the 
others in the various sequences which give 
<iircction to the professionally trained 
teacher. 

Joyner 101 Mr. Fracker 

S52. The Secondary School (3). 11 :45 
Organization and administration of the 
high school curriculmn; methods of plan- 
ning and teaching; qualifications of the 
high school teacher. 

Joyner 101 Mis.K Bell 



S53, Child and Adolescent 

Psychology (3). 10:2.S 

A survey of the psychological develop- 
ment of the indi\adual through childhood 
and adolescence. 

Joyner 101 Miss Bell 

S91. Social Problems in Education. 7:45 
A review of current problems confront- 
ing education in the United States. 



Joyner 101 



Mr. Fracke, 



ENGLISH 

S2. Principles of Writing (3). 10:25 

Joyner 107 Dr. Johnson 

S22. Development of English 

Literature (3). 7:45 

Survey of English literature from the 
beginnings through Shakespeare. 

Joyner 107 Dr. Johnson 



GEOGRAPHY 




S21. Principles of Human 
Geography (3). 


10:25 


Joyner 236 


Dr. Syron 



HISTORY 

521 . History of the Uniteil States to 1865 

(3). 7:45 

Joyner 126 Mr. Gofj 

522. History of the United States from 
1865 (3). 9:05 

Joyner 126 Mr. Cofj 



MATHEMATICS 




SI. College Algebra (3). 


7:45 


Hnnler 218 


Dr. Catiadey 


S2. Trigonometry (3). 


10:25 


Hunter 218 


Dr. Canaday 



APPLIED MUSIC 

Instruction in organ, piano, and voice 
will be available in private lessons. The 
work will be adjusted to suit the needs of 
each student. College credit will be granted 



for this work on the basis of one semester 
hour for nine hours per week of practice. 

Organ — Dr. Cooper 

Piano — /1/r. Pratt 

Voice — Miss Donley 

S26. Music Appreciation {H). 11:45 

A course adapted to the needs of the 
general college student. 

Jones 104 Dr. Cooper 

S21, S22. Second Year Theory (6). 

7:45 and 10:25 
Adapted for Sophomores majoring in 
Music. Prerequisite: Theory 1, 2. 

Jones 203 Miss Swanson 

RELIGION 

51. An Introduction to the Old Testament 

(3). 9:05 

Joyner 238 Dr. Cochran 

52. An Introduction to the Neiv Testament 

(3). 10:25 

Joyner 238 Dr. Cochran 

SPANISH 

521. Intermediate College Spanish (3). 

9:05 
Review of the essentials of the Spanish 
language; composition; intensive oral-aural 
practice; conversational drill. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or 
equivalent. 

Joyner 211 Dr. McAllister 

522, Intermediate College Spanish (3). 

11:45 
Reading and conversation of appropriate 
difficulty. Oral-aural aids used include rec- 
ords, tape recorder, and short wave radio. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 21, or equiv- 
alent, imless the student registers 
for the full year's work. 

Joyner 211 Dr. McAllister 

Please fill out the attached application blank 
and return beforo June 1st to 

DEAJf L. A. PEACOCK 

Meredith College 

Enioigb, N. C. 




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MEREDITH COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 

AprU, 1963 




Announcements for 1963-1964 



Raleigh 



North Carolina 



2WERED1TH COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 



AprU, 1963 




Announcements for 1963-1964 



Raleigb 



North Carolina 



Publlahed quarterly by Meredith CoIIefce at Raleigh. N. C. Entered January 13. 1908. 
at Raleigh. N. C. an aecond-class matter under act of Conirreaa of July 18, 1B94. 



Series bt 



APRIL, 1963 



No. 



CONTENTS 

Communications with College Inside Front Cover 

College Calendar 5 

Recognition 6 

Purpose and Policy 6 

Board of Trustees 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Faculty 9 

Faculty and Staff Committees 13 

Officers of the Alumnae Association 14 

General Information 15 

Location 16 

Expenses 21 

Scholarships 28 

Student Loan Funds 24 

Summer Session 26 

Requirements for Admission 26 

Requirements for Degrees 30 

General Academic Regulations 30 

Courses of Instruction 41 

Degrees Conferred 80 

Register of Students 83 

Index 96 



(8) 



1963 

JANUARY MAY SEPTEMBER 



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1 2 


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3 


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4 


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— 






12 3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


b 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


X 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


17 


28 


29 30 31 






26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




29 


30 












FEBRUARY 










JUNE 










OCTOBER 






S_ 


M 


T W T 


F 
1 


S 
2 


_S_ 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 
1 


S 


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12 3 


F 

4 


i 

6 


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JANUARY MAY SEPTEMBER 



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COLLEGE CALENDAR 

SUMMER SESSION, 1963 



June 


10 Monday 

11 Tuesday 
17-21 Mon.-Fri. 


Registration, 2:00 p.m. 
Beginning of classes, 7 :45 a.m. 
School of Christian Studies 


July 


19 Friday 

20 Saturday 


Examinations 
Commencement exercises 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1963-1964 



September 9 Monday 
10-13 Tues.-Fri. 
12 Thursday 



13 Friday 

14 Saturday 

24 Tuesday 

25 "Wednesday 
7 Thursday 

14 Thursday 
14-16 Thurs.-Sat. 
27 Wednesday 



November 



December 



January 



2 Monday 
15 Sunday 
20 Friday 

3 Friday 
18 Saturday 

20-25 Mon.-Sat. 

25 Saturday 



Airival of all new students 
Orientation program for aU new students 
Registration of freshmen and transfer 

students 
Registration of returning students 
Beginning of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
Last day for class-schedule changes 
Founders' Day 
Mid-semester reports 
Examinations on "tlock" courses 
Beginning of Thanksgiving recess, 

1:00 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
Program of Christmas music 
Beginning of Christmas recess, 1 :00 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
Reading Day 

First-semester examinations 
Commencement exercises 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1963-1964 



January 
February 



29 Wednesday 

30 Thursday 
10 Mondav 

10-14 Mon.-Fri. 

22 Saturday 



25 Tuesday 
23-25 Mon.-Wed. 
24 Tuesday 
2f> Thursday 

1 Wednesday 

2 Saturday 
22 Friday 

23-29 Sat.-Fri. 
May 80-June 1 Sat.-Mon. 



March 



April 
May 



Registration for second semester 

Beginning of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 

Last day for class-selicdule changes 

Religious Emphasis Week 

Last day to file applications for degrees 

in .Tune, 1964 
Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
Examinations in "block" courses 
Mid-soinester reports due 
Beginning of spring recess, 1 :00 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
May Day 
Road in [» Day 

Sei'ond-semester examinations 
Commencement exercises 

(5> 



^urpose and Policy 



"The purpose of Meredith College is to develop in its students 
the Christian attitude toward the whole of life, and to prepare 
them for iutelligent citizenship, home-making, graduate study, and 
for professional and other fields of service. Its intention is to provide 
not only thorough instruction, but also culture made perfect through 
the religion of Jesus Christ. These ideals of academic integrity and 
religious influence have always been cherished at Meredith." 

". . . that Meredith College, a liberal arts college for women, 
should continue to emphasise and develop its academic program 
in terms of scholastic standards and service, giving appropriate 
attention to requirements for the admission and retention of students, 
the formulation and administration of its curriculum, and the main- 
tenance of procedures implicit in an educational institution of high 
quality ; 

"and that, as a Christian college, Meredith should be primarily 
concerned to inculcate attitudes, provide activities, and promote learning 
calculated to deepen and broaden the Christian experience of its 
students and to prepare them for maximum service in the Christian 
enterprise." 

— from Purpose and Policy, as re- 
stated by Board of Trustees, 1954 



Recognition 



Meredith College is a member of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and the Association of American Colleges. 
Graduates of Meredith are eligible for membership in the American 
Association of University Women. Meredith College is a liberal arts 
member of the National Association of Schools of Music. 



(6) 



ORGANIZATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Charles B. Deane Chairman 

C. C. Cameron Vice-Chairman 

V. H. Belcher Secretary-Treasurer 

Terms Expire 196S 

Raymond A. Bryan Goldsboro 

C. C. Cameron Raleigh 

Foy J. Farmer Raleigh 

W. W. Fiulator Raleigh 

L. M. Massey Zebulon 

Marvin L. Slate High Point 

W. Fred Williams Greensboro 

Terms Expire 196^ 

Maude D. Bunn Raleigh 

Elizabeth J. Dotterer Sanford 

Paul Early Greensboro 

Hatcher S. Elliott Charlotte 

Hayden B. Hayes Hickory 

Ernest P. Russell Concord 

Straughan H. Watkins Henderson 

Terms Expire 1966 

Claude T. Bowers Raleigh 

Hubert M. Craig Lincolnton 

Charles B. Deane Rockingham 

lone K. Knight Madison 

E. L. Rankin, Jr. Raleigh 

Virginia L. Robertson Rocky Mount 

Virginia L. Wood Leaksville 

Terms Expire 1966 

Howard R. Boozer Raleigh 

Warren Carr Durham 

Bunali L. Clark Ashoville 

Eleanor L. Davis Winston-Salom 

Roberts Lasater Charlotte 

John A. Stevens Wilmington 

W. H. Trentman Raleigh 

Executive Committee 
L. M. Massey, Chairman Warren Oarr 

E. L. Rnnkin, Jr.. Vice-Chairman Elizabeth .T. Dotterer 

Howard R. Boozer Foy J. Farmer 

Maude T. Bunn W.' W. Finlntor 

C. C. Cameron W. H. Trentman 

W. Fred Williams 

(7) 



8 MEBEmiTH COLLEGE 

ADMINISTRATION 

President Carlyle Campbell, AM., LL.D. 

Director of Public Relations Sankey L. Blanton, DJD. 

Dean Leishman A. Peacock, Ph.D. 

Business Manager and Treasurer Y. Howard Belcher, B.8. 

Dean of Students Louise E. Fleming, A.M. 

Library Librarian Hazel Baity, A.B. in L.8. 

Asst. Librarian Jane Greene, A.B. in L.S., A.M. 

Assistant Virginia B. Pruden, A.B. 

Assistant Dorothy F. McCombs, A.B. 

Becords Registrar Vera Tart Marsh 

Student Personnel Asst. Dean of Students Lula M. Leake, M.R.E. 

Asst. Dean of Students MaBelle Smith 

Asst. Dean of Students 

Imogene F. Lipscomb, A.M. 
Religions Activities Director Miriam H. Prichard, A.M. 

Healtb Service Physician William J. Senter, B.S., M.D. 

Nurse Edna Hurst, R.N. 

Nurse Lucy H. Saunders, R.N. 

Alumnae Association Executive Secretary Mae Grimmer, A.B. 

Public Relationa Assistant Mary Bland Josey, A.B. 

News Bureau Director Agnes Cooper, AJB. 

Dining Hall Dietitian Bobbye Hunter 

Assistant Harriet Holler 

Hostess Frances E. Thome 

Dormitories Acting House Director Martha J. Whilden 

Asst. House Director Lucille Dandridge 

Equitation Director Mary M. Edwards 

Supply Store Manager Dm M. Hinsley, A.B. 

Secretarial Staff Secretary to the President Lois S. Renfrow 

Secretary to the Director of Public Relations 

Carolyn Covington, A.B. 

Secretary to the Dean Mary K. Hamilton 

Secretary to the Dean 

Elizabeth N. Gallaudet, A.B. 

Secretary to the Registrar Virginia Bankhead 

Bookkeeper Faye F. Orders 

Bookkeeper Agnes W. Johnson 

Secretary to the Business Manager 

Virginia Scarhoro 

Secretary, Business Office Margaret L. Johnson 

Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Betty Jean Teager, AJS. 

Secretary, Alumnae Office Evelyn R. Posey 



ORGANIZATION 9 

FACULTYi 

CABLYLE CAMPBELL (19.30), A.M., LL.D. Pre*ldent 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University; LL.D., University of South Carolina, Wake Forest 
College 

LEISHMAN A. PEACOCK (1048), PH.D. Dean 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University : Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

ERNEST F. CAN ADA Y (1020), PH.D. Professor of Mathematica 

A.B , William Jewell College ; A.M., University of Missouri ; Ph.D., 
Duke University 

ELLEN DOZIEK BREWER (1019), A.M. Professor of Borne BconomUsi 
A.B., Meredith College; B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

HARRY E. COOPER (1937), MUS.D., F.A.G.O. Professor of Mutio 

A.B., Ottawa University ; Mns.B., Homer Institute of Fine Arte ; 
Mu.s.D., Bush Conservatory; Fellow, American Guild of Organists; 
Guy Weitz, London 

MARY YARBROUGH (1928), PH.D. Professor of Chemistry and Physic* 
A.B., Meredith College; M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 
Duke University 

JOHN A. YARBROUGH (1943), PH.D. Professor of Biology 

A.B., Oklahoma Baptist University ; M.S., University of Oklahoma ; 
Ph.D., State University of Iowa; Graduate Student, Northwestern 
University 

QUENTIN OLIVER McALLISTER (1944). PH.D. 

Professor of Foreign Languaget 
A.B., A.M., Washington and Jefferson College; Ph.D., University 
of PittsburKh 

RALPH E. McLAIN (1945), PH.D. Professor of Religion 

A.I?., Muskingum College; Th.M., Ph.D.. Southern Baptist Tlieologlcal 
Seminary ; Graduate Student, Columbia University, University of 
Chicago 

MARY LYNCH JOHNSON (lOlS), PH.D., L.H.D. Professor of Flnglish 
A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., CorneU 
University ; L.H.D., Wake Forest College 

STUART PRATT (1942), MUS.M. Professor of HutU) 

A.B., llartwlck College; Mus.B., Philadelphia Mmilcal Academy; 
MuB.M., Syracuse University ; Two years In Berlin ; Marta Slebold, 
Hugo Kann, Walter Sclmrwenka, Egon Petri 



■ The date after a name Indicates the first year of serrlce at Meredith CoUece. 



10 MEREDITH COLLEGE . 

DAVID R. REVELET (1955), YH.D. Professor of Education 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

LESLIE VF. STRON (1945). PH.D Professor of Booiology 

A.B., Mary Baldwin College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina 

NORMA ROSE (1937), PH.D. Professor of English 

A.B., Meredith College ; A.M., University of North Carolina ; Ph.D., 
Yale University 

ROGER H. CROOK (1949), TH.D. Professor of Religion 

A.B., Wake Forest College; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary ; Graduate Student, Duke University 

ETHEL TILLBX (1951), PH.D. Professor of Psychology and Philosophy 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

LOIS FRAZIER (1954), ED.D. Professor of Business and Economics 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.S., 
University of North Carolina ; Ed.D., Indiana University 

SARAH McCULLOH LEMMON (1947), PH.D. Professor of History 

B.S., Madison College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina 

JENNIE M. HANTEN (1931), A.M. Associate Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

BEATRICE DONLEY (1942), B.M. Associate Professor of Music 

B.M. (Voice), B.M. (Public School Music), West Virginia University; 
Voice with Horatio Connell, Juilliard School of Music ; Voice with 
Adelaide Gescheidt, New York 

HARRY K. DORSETT (1941), A.M. Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., Wake Forest College; A.M., Columbia University; Graduate 
Student, George Peabody College for Teachers ^ 

7 
SUSANNE H. FREUND (1947), PH.D. 

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Abitiirium, Berlin ; Ph.D., University of Heidelberg 

TONE KEMP KNIGHT (1956), PH.D. Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., University of Penn.sylvania ; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina 

LUCY ANN NEBLETT (1947), A.M. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., University of Texas; A.M., University of California at Los 
Angeles ; Graduate Student, University of Mexico, University of 
Havana, University of North Carolina, Inter-American University 



ORGANIZATION U 

LILA BELL (IWl), M.ED. Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.Ed., 
Duke University ; Graduate Student, Columbia University, University 
of North Carolina 

HELEN JO COLLINS (1944), M.S. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Colorado State Agricultural College; M.S., Iowa State College 

JEIAN SW ANSON (1954), MUS.M., F.A.G.O. Assistant Professor of Music 
A.B., Macalester College ; M.Mus., Northwestern University ; Graduate 
Student, University of California, Union Theological Seminary School 
of Sacred Music; Fellow, American Guild of Organists 

EDWIN K. BLANCHARD (1952), M.MUS.LIT. Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., M.Mus.Lit., Eastman School of Music 

JAT D. MASSET (1957), A.M. Assistant Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 
B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; A.M., 
New York University 

JAMES H. EADS, JR. (1958), M.S. Assistant Professor of Biology 

A.B., University of Kansas ; M.S., University of Alabama 

PHYLLIS W. GARRISS (1951), M.MUS. Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., B.M., Hastings College; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music 

BERNARD H. COCHRAN (1960), PH.D. Assistant Professor of Religion 
A.B., Stetson University; B.D., Th.M., Southeastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary ; Ph.D., Duke University 

LUCY B. JEFFRIES (1960), M.F.A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute ; M.F.A. , Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina 

ARTHUR C. DOWNS, JR. (1961), ED.D. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Philadelphia Museum College of Art; A.M., Ed.D., Columbia 
University 

MAMIE HAFNER (1953), A.M. Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., University of Alabama; A.M., University of North Carolina; 
Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin 

ELEANOR KRUMMEL (1962), A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., A.M., Duke University: B.S. in Music, Institute of Musical .Vrt : 
Graduate Student, University of North Carolina, University of 
Poitiers 

PRESTON D. PARSONS (1902). A.B.. B.D. Assistant Professor of Sociology 
A.B., Atlantic Christian College; B.D., Vanderbilt University; 
Graduate Student, Unlv<"rsUy of North Carolina 



12 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

HELENA W. ALLEN (1952), M.Ed. Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

BDTH B. ROBINSON (1953), M.Ed. Instructor in Businest 

B.S'., Oregon State College ; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University 
of North Carolina 

VELMA MAE GORSAGE (1956), A.M. Instructor in English 

B.F.A., Illinois Wesle.van University; A.M., University of Arkansas 

ISABELLE HAES'ELER (1956), M.S.M. Instructor in Musio 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S.M., Union Theological Seminary; 
Graduate Student, Colorado Seminary, University of North Carolina 

WILLIAM R. LEDFORD (1!157), A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languages 
A.B., Berea College; A.M., State University of Iowa; Graduate 
Student, Mlddlebury College, University of North Carolina 

JAMES L. CLYBURN (1958), M.S. Instructor in MuHo 

A.B., Elon College; M.S., Juilllard School of Music 

DOROTHY P. GREENWOOD (1959), A.M. Instructor in English 

A.B.. Randolph-Macon Woman's CoUege ; A.M., Tulane University : 
Graduate Student, Columbia University 

RICHARD D. GOFF (1961), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., Duke University; A.M., Cornell University; Graduate Student, 
Duke University 

DOROTHY K. I'RESTON (1961), A.M. Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University 

VERNON O. STUMPF (1961), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., A.M., University of Southern California; Graduate Student, 
Duke University 

P. A. CLINE, JR. (1962), A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languaget 

A.B., Wake Forest College; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary ; A.M., University of North Carolina 

J. HENRY COFFER, JR., (1962), TH.M. Instructor in ReUgion 

A.B., Mercer University; B.D., Yale University; Th.M., Southeastern 
Theological Seminary; Graduate Student, Duke University 

VIRGINIA J. HOOD (1962), B.S. Instructor in Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Michigan State University; Graduate Student, University of 
North Carolina 

THOMAS C. PABRAMORE (1962), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina; Graduate Student, 
University of North Carolina 

EVELYN P. SIMMONS (1962), M.S. Instructor in Economic* 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women ; M.S., University of Tennes- 
see; Graduate Student, University of Florida 



ORGANIZATION IS 



PART-TIME MEMBERS OF FACULTY 

GENEVA MARTIN (1957) Mathematics 

A.B., Western Kentucky Teachers College 

ANNA B. PECK (19G0), A.M. Oeography 

A.B., A.M., University of Kentucky 

ANN ELIZA BREWER (1961), A.M. Foreign Languages 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University 

ELIZABETH S. CHAMBERLAIN (1961), A.M. English 

A.B., Wellesley College; A.M., University of Michigan 

HELEN P. KELMAN (1961) A.M. Biology 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; A.M., 
University of North Carolina 

FRANCES W. STEVENS (1961), A.M. Physical Education 

A.B., Mary Washington College ; A.M., New York University 

JOSEPHINE C. BONDl (1962), M.S. Art 

B.S'., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

BOBERT G. FRACKER (1962), M.S. Education 

B.S., East Tennessee State College ; M.S., Appalachian State Teachers 
College 

HENRY R. PEARCY (1962), PH.D. History 

Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary ; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago 

FACULTY AND STAFF COMMITTEES FOR 1962-63 

Administrative Council — Heads of academic departments : Mr. Camp- 
bell, Mr. Peacock, Miss Fleming, Miss Baity, Mrs. Marsh 

Auditorium — Miss Fleming, Mr. Belcher, Miss Gorsage, Mrs. Massey, 
Mr. Pratt 

Budget — Mr. McAllister, Miss Baity, Mr. Belcher, Mr. Blanchard, 
Mrs. Collins, Miss Frazier, Mrs. Jeffries 

Concerts, Lectures — Miss Tilley, Mr. Cochran, Mr. Clyburn, Miss 
Donley, Miss Lemmon, Mr. Yarbrough 

Curriculum — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Cooper, Miss Johnson, Mr. McAllister, 
Mr. McLain, Miss Syron, Miss Yarbrough 

Instruction — Miss Rose, Miss Bell, Mr. Cochran, Mrs. Freund, Mr. 
Goff, Mrs. Preston, Miss Tilley 

Library — Miss Baity, Mr. Downs, Mr. Goff, Mrs. Greenwood, Mr. 
Reveley, Miss Swanson, Mr. Yarbrough 



• Second semester. 1962-1963 



14 MEEBDITH COLLEGE 

Orientation- — Miss Josey, Mrs. Allen, Mr. Dorsett, Miss Gorsage, Miss 
Haeseler, Miss Knight, Miss Leake 

Scholarships — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Canaday, Miss Fleming, Miss Lem- 
mou, Mr. McLain, Miss Rose, Mr. Yarbrough 

Social Functions — Miss Fleming, Miss Brewer, Miss Grimmer, Miss 
Hanyen, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Marsh, Mrs. Whilden 

Student Government — Miss Fleming, Mr. Peacock, Miss Bell, Mr. 
Eads, Mr. Cochran, Miss Yarbrough, Mr. Crook, Miss Syron 

Student Health — -Mrs. Hurst, Mr. Belcher, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Massey, 
Mrs. Smith, Mrs. "Whilden 

Vocational Information — Mr. Dorsett, Mr. Cline, Mrs. Collins, Mrs. 
Garriss, Mr. Goff, Miss Knight, Miss ISTeblett 

Faculty Organization — (special) — Mr. Crook, Mr. Canaday, Miss 
Frazier, Miss Lemmon, Mr. Reveley, Mies Swanson, Mi-. Yar- 
brough 

OFFICERS OF THE MEREDITH COLLEGE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 1962-1963 

Mrs. Chas. S. Sullivan, Durham President 

Mrs. J. R. Overby, Smithfield Past President 

Mrs. J. Gordon Eiddick, Raleigh Vice-President 

Mrs. Louis P. Nipper, Asheville Vice-President 

(Asheville Division) 

Mrs. Calvin Ussery, Lexington Vice-President 

(Charlotte Division) 

Mrs. Robert E. Fleming, Jr., Rocky Mount Vice-President 

(Elizabeth City Division) 

Mrs. Wm. M. Watts, Asheboro Vice-President 

(Greensboro Division) 

Mrs. John E. Elam, Bladenboro Vice-President 

(Wilmington Division) 

Mrs. John A. Edwards, Raleigh Recording Secretary 

Miss Mac Grimmer, Raleigh Executive Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. J. W. Duke, Jr., Durham 



A lumn ae-at-La rge 
Miss Lena Mae Williams, Chapel Hill 

Miss Lois Johnson, Wagram Commencement Speaker 



GENERAL INPORMATION 



Meredith College, founded by the North Carolina Baptist Con- 
vention, was granted a charter in 1891, and was first opened to 
students in September, 1899. It was chartered as the Baptist Female 
University, a name changed in 1905 to the Baptist University for 
Women, and in 1909 to Meredith College. This last name was 
given in honor of Thomas Meredith, for many years a recognized 
leader of the Baptist denomination in I^orth Carolina, who in 1838 
presented to the Baptist State Convention a resolution urging the 
establishment in or near Ealeigh of "a female seminary of high order 
that should be modeled and conducted on strictly religious principles, 
but that should be, so far as possible, free from sectarian influences." 

The institution has had four presidents : James Carter Blasingame, 
1899-1900; Richard Tilman Vami, 1900-1915; Charles Edward Brewer, 
1915-1939; Carlyle Campbell, 1939—. 



LOCATION 

Meredith College, with a campus of 170 acres, is located in the 
capital city of North Carolina. This area, the educational center of 
the state, provides many religious, social, and educational advantages. 
The campus may be found on U. S. Route 1 in the Western part of 
the city. 



BUILDINGS 

The administration building, four dormitories, and the dining 
hall — all brick fireproof structures — form a quadrangle around a court. 
Johnson Ilnll contains on the first floor .-idministrative off'ices and 
reception rooms; on the second floor the library and rooms for the 
use of non-resident students ; and on the third floor an assembly room 
for the two literary societies. The dormitories — Brewer Tlall, Faircloth 
Hall, Vann ITall, and Stringfield Hall — accommodate from 140 to 
170 students in each building. The rooms in the dormitories, planned 
for two students each, are arranged in suites of two with a connecting 
bath. Each occupant has a single bod and a closet of her own. 
There is a social room on each floor. A kitchenette, a pressing room 
and a launderette are available in each dormitory. 

On the east side of the campus, adjoining the quadrangle, 
a new dormitory was completed for use in 1!H)2. Jones Hiill, the 
auditorium and music building erected at a cost of half-a-million dollars, 
was completed for use in 1950. The two-story building contains a large 

(16) 



16 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

auditorium, a lobby, a reception room, and facilities for the Department 
of Music : studios, offices and classrooms, a smaU assembly hall, practice 
rooms, a music library, a listening room, a recording studio, an 
instrument storage room, and provision for organ pumps and equip- 
ment. Storage space and a set-construction shop under the main 
stage are provided for college dramatic productions. 

West of Vann Hall is Joyner Hall, a modem classroom building 
of two floors opened in 1956. Included in the building are classrooms 
for non-scientific subjects, offices for faculty, a small auditorium 
equipped with visual aids, sound-proof recording booths for languages 
classes, art studios and a small art gallery, seminar rooms, a lounge 
and a kitchenette. 

Hunter Hall, the new science building, is on the west side of the 
campus, located north of Joyner Hall. Here are classrooms and 
laboratories for biology, business, chemistry, economics, home eco- 
nomics, mathematics and physics. Adequate space is provided for 
offices and research laboratories for faculty, a science library, a 
photographic darkroom, and a reception room. A greenhouse is used 
by the Department of Biology for botany classes. 

Northwest of Hunter Hall is the Ellen Brewer House which 
provides an opportunity for seniors in the Home Economics Depart- 
ment in small, rotating groups, under the guidance of an instructor, 
to gain actual experience in home management. Erected in 1959, 
it offers all the modern facilities of a homelike, convenient residence, 
including, in addition to the four bedrooms and baths, a study for 
student use, an office for the supervisor, a living room, a dining room, 
a family room and a kitchen. 

Adjoining the quadrangle west of the dining hall a modern air- 
conditioned infirmary was opened in 1962. 

East of the dormitories are the physical education building, the 
campus store, and the post ofl'ice. 

LIBRARY : 

The library, located on the second floor of Johnson Hall, 
offers facilities for study, supplementary and recreational reading, 
and reference work. It contains approximately 44,000 volumes and 
a large nimiber of pamplilcts. The books are carefully selected by the 
librarian and the heads of departments to meet the needs of the 
students. The periodical room is supplied with the leading literary, 
scientific, and educational magazines, and state and national news- 
papers. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

As a distinctly Christian college, Meredith makes every effort 
to encourage the spiritual growth of its students. A Director of 
Religious Activities gives guidance and counsel to students in their 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

organized work and in their individual problems. Each year, in 

February, a visiting speaker is invited to the campus to lead students 

in a series of services looking toward deeper spiritual thinking and 
experience. 

All regular students are required to attend the chapel services 
five days each week. All students are also encouraged to attend 
Sunday school and church services each Sunday morning at churches 
in the city. 

HEALTH 

A well-equipped aii'-conditioned infirmary under the direction of 
two graduate nurses and the College physician is maintained for the 
care of the sick and for the teaching of good health habits. Three daily 
office hours are observed by the nurses and emergencies are cared for 
at any hour. The College physician has designated office hours at the 
College at which time students may see him. It is the purpose of the 
physician and nurses to prevent illness by means of the knowledge and 
observance of the general laws of health. Health ratings based on a: 
positive health program are recorded annually. 

A student health blank furnished by the College following ac- 
ceptance of the student must be completed and mailed directly to the 
Dean, Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. Physical examinations by 
the Health Service and the Department of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation will be made during the orientation program and completed as 
soon as possible thereafter. All necessary ocular and dental work 
should be attended to before students enter or during vacations. In 
emergencies this work may be done by specialists in Raleigh without 
loss of time from classes. These appointments as well as those with 
other physicians and dentists must be made through the College in- 
firmary. 

RESIDENCE 

Students not living at their own homes or with near relatives 
are required to live in tlie College dormitories. Stringfield Hall and 
a section of Vann Hall are reserved for freshmen. 

Students should bring with them towels, sheets, pillows, pillow- 
cases, bedspreads, and all other bed coverings likely to be needed. 
All rooms are furnished with single beds. Curtains, draperies, rugs, 
and pictures will make the room more attractive. 

All laundry must be clearly marked with name tape. The laundry 
fee collected by the College covers the cost of flat work only. Each 
student may have laundered each week two sheets, two pillowcases, 
one bedspread, four towels, and one bureau scarf. 

All dormitories will be closed during the Christmas and Spring 
holidays. 



18 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Association. "Each student in coming to 
Meredith College accepts college citizenship involving self-government 
under the honor code." On this concept, so defined in Ai'ticle III, 
Section 2, of the constitution of the Student Government Association, 
all campus government is based. All Meredith students are thereby 
members of the Student Government Association, the chief purpose 
of which ia the promotion of a high sense of honor as the basis of all 
student government policy. Through the effective functioning of the 
honor code, the Association seeks to regulate the life of the students 
for the good of all concerned. The leadership of the Association is 
composed of three elected groups : the Legislative, Judicial, and Student 
Activity Boards. The Student Government Council, composed of the 
Student Government president and representatives from each board, 
serves as the Executive Committee of the Association. A Faculty 
Committee on Student Government confers with these boards on major 
matters of discipline and policy. The Student Government Association 
holds regular meetings at the chapel period each Thursday, at which 
time the students have an opportunity to discuss matters of special 
interest to them. 

Religious Organizations. The religious activities of the students 
are under the general direction of the Baptist Student Union, its 
council including the officers of auxiliary organizations and a repre- 
sentative of students belonging to other churches than a Baptist church. 
Vespers and Family Altar provide worship opportunities on the 
campus. Study groups are held throughout the year for helpful think- 
ing and working together. Missionary opportunities are provided by 
the Young Woman's Auxiliary. Enjoyable parties, to which students 
from the neighboring colleges are sometimes invited, are also included 
in the programs of the Union. One week each year is set aside as 
Religious Focus Week, at which time Christian leaders from outside 
the college community are invited to direct student thinking ia all 
areas of life. The character and number of religious activities fostered 
on the Meredith campus are evidence of the Christian purposefulness 
of Meredith students. 

Honor Society. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor Society, organized 
in 1923, has as its special aim the promotion of scholarship at Meredith. 
Members are admitted on the basis of scholastic standing maintained 
over a period of two years or more. Each year Kappa Nu Sigma 
presents some distinguished speaker, who is heard by the entire college 
community. 

Departmental Cluhs. A means of cultural enrichment is offered 
students in the various departmental clubs at Meredith. These are 
the International Relations Club and the Meredith League of Women 
Voters, the Elizabeth Avery Colton English Club, the Creative Writing 



GENEKAL INFORMATION 19 

Club, the Barber Science Club, the Art Club, the French Club, the 
German Club, La Tertulia Spanish Club, the Canaday Mathematics 
Club, the Home Economics Club, the Sociology Club, the Tyner Future 
Teachers Club, the Granddaughters' Club, the Hoof Print Club, the 
Monogram Club, the Price Latin Club, the Freeman Eeligion Club, 
Psi Chi (Psychology) and Tomorrow's Business Women. Most of 
these hold monthly meetings and aim at an approach to their subjects 
somewhat different from the distinctly academic. 

Literary Societies. Two societies, the Astrotekton and the Philare- 
tian, have been in existence since the early days of the College. In 
addition to the presentation of programs at regular meetings, each 
society offers a medal for the best essay written by one of its members 
during the academic year. 

The Silver Shield. Selection for membership in the Silver Shield, 
honorary leadership society of the College, is based upon Christian 
character, constructive leadership, and service to the College. Members 
are chosen from the senior and junior classes at a public "tapping" 
ceremony. The Silver Shield was organized in 1935. 

Publications. There are three student publications at Meredith: 
The Twig, a newspaper, issued bi-weekly, in the columns of which 
College happenings are recorded and student opinion expressed; The 
Acorn, a literary journal published four times during the College year; 
and Oak Leaves, the College yearbook. 

The Chorus. The Meredith Chorus, directed by a member of the 
music faculty, appears in concert at stated intervals throughout the 
College year. 

Sigma Alpha Iota. Music majors and candidates for the Bachelor 
of Music degree who meet the scholastic requirements and have the 
approval of the music faculty are eligible for membership in Sigma 
Alpha Iota. This national music fraternity for women encourages 
students by both awards and scholarships. 

The Phi Kappa Chapter of Sigma Pi Alpha was organized at 
Meredith in 1941. Sigma Pi Alpha is a national honorary modem 
language fraternity which seeks to recognize outstanding achievement 
in modern languages and to encourage active interest in the culture 
of the nations in which such languages are spoken. Students of Spanish, 
French, and Cierman are selected on the basis of achievement and 
interest. 

The Meredith Playhouse. The Meredith Playhouse provides for 
students who are interested in dramatics both the opportunity to 
appear in plays and practical experience in play production. Several 
plays are presented during tlie winter. A cliapter of Alpha Psi Omega, 



20 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

national honorary dramatic fraternity, gives special recognition to 
members of The Meredith Playhouse who excel in its activities. 

The Athletic Association. The Athletic Association cooperates 
with the Department of Health and Physical Education in planning 
a wide range of recreational activities. Archery, badminton, basketball, 
bowling, equitation, field hockey, golf, softball, volleyball, and tennis 
are among the activities offered. 

The four classes compete in the presentation of an original dra- 
matic production on Stunt Night. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 

EXPENSES 

GENERAL FEES FOR THE YEAR 

Resident Students 

Tuition: instruction, library, lectures and recitals, 

academic administration $660.00 

Residence : room and board, laundry, infirmary service, 

maintenance 640.00 

$1,300.00 
Norir-resident Students 

Tuition (as above) $660.00 

SPECIAL FEES FOR EACH SEMESTER 

Applied Music (two half-hour lessons a week) : 

Regular Students $50.00 or $60.00 

Part-Time Students and Special Students 100.00 

Use of practice room, with piano, one hour daily 9.00 

For each additional hour 6.00 

Use of organ, one hour daily 30.00 to 50.00 

Use of practice room, without piano, one hour daily 5.00 

For each additional hour 4.00 

Course fee, for special and part-time students, for each credit hour 22.00 

Education 495, 496 35.00 

Golf 5.00 

Home Economics 493 or 493S 40.00 

Horseback Riding (two hours a week) 45.00 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Graduation fee, including diploma $10.00 

Gymnasium Costume (approximate cost) 12.00 

Late registration 2.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Transcript of academic record (after first copy) 1.00 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 
For resident students: 

A fee of $25.00 must accompany each application of a new 
student. This fee will be credited on the account of those applicants 
who enter. A $15.00 refund will be made if the request is received by 
April 1. 

The registration fee of $25.00 for a student now in college 
who wishes to reserve a room for next session must be paid before 
March 1. This foe will be credited on the account of those students 
who re-enter. The fee will he refunded if the request is received by 
June 15. 

The balance is payable as follows: 

For new students, on or before April 1 ; old students 
on or before June 15, for the ensuing session (not 

refundable) $ 60.00 

At the beginning of the First Semester 275.00 



22 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

On November 5 the balance of tbe amount for the 
first semester 

At the beginning of the Second Semester $350.00 

On March 24 the balance of the amount for the second 
semester 

For noTu-resident students: 

At the beginning of each semester $190.00 

On November 5 the balance of the amount for the first 
semester will be due. On March 24 the balance for the 
second semester will be due. 

The preceding statements as to charges and terms of payment 
are the equivalent of a contract between the College and its patrons. 
Neither the President nor the Business Manager is expected to modify 
these regulations without specific authorization from the Board of 
Trustees. 

In view of the prevailing xmcertainty as to cost of labor and 
materials, the College reserves the right to change its fees for room 
and board at the beginning of each semester if conditions make it 
necessary. Patrons will be given advance notice of any change to be 
made. 

A student is not officially registered or entitled to enroll in any 
class until satisfactory financial arrangements have been made with 
the Business Manager. Under no circumstances will a student be 
allowed to take semester examinations or receive a transcript of her 
record until her account has been paid in full. 

A deduction of ten per cent is allowed where two or more students 
come from the same family. 

Members of the junior and senior classes planning to be mission- 
aries will receive, on certification by their local churches, an allowance 
of $100 on their expenses for the year. 

Students are not required to make a breakage deposit to cover 
unjustifiable damage to college property, but for such damage they will 
be expected to pay. 

Resident students are not charged for the ordinary services of 
the College physician and nurses, and for the use of the infirmary. 
For additional service in case of serious or prolonged illness, and 
for all special medical prescriptions, the patron is expected to pay. 

If a student withdraws or is dismissed from the institution 
before the end of a semester, no refund will be made for the quarter 
of the year in which she leaves. Proportionate refund may be allowed 
on residence charges if a student is continuously absent for at least 
four weeks because of illnesp. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOAN FUNDS, SELF-HELP 

Freshman Scholarships. The Board of Trustees authorizes the 
annual award of forty-five scholarships to resident members of the in- 
coming freshman class. Fifteen of these scholarships are valued at 
$400.00 each; thirty, at $250.00 each. Awards will be based on 
outstanding scholastic achievement and promise, qualities of social 
leadership, and financial need. A freshman applicant who feels 
qualified and desires to be considered as a scholarship recipient should 
address a request directly to President Carlyle Campbell, Meredith 
College. The application and supporting credentials should be sub- 
mitted by February 15. 

Upper-Class Scholarships. Thirty scholarships, valued at $250 each, 
are awarded to resident members of the sophomore, junior, and senior 
classes on the basis stated above. Applications and supporting creden- 
tials should be submitted to the Dean by May 1. 

Endowed Scholarships. Friends of the College have established 
endowment funds for scholarship aid, the principal of which amounts 
to $39,850. These funds provide for sixteen scholarships, as indicated 
below. In some cases the donors have made specific restrictions affect- 
ing the award of the scholarships, but students interested may write 
the President of the College. Value, $120.00. 

The J. T. J. Battle Scholarships (four) 

The Z. M. Caveness Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. John E. Efird Scholarships (two) 

The Myrtle Ilart Farmer Scholarship 

The ITester Farrior Scholarship 

The Fuller B. Hamrick Scholarship 

The Ella G. Holcomb Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Matthews Scholarship 

The Ida Poteat Scholarship 

The Emma Barber Towler Scholarships (two) 

The Mollic B. Wyatt Scholarship 

The Helen Price Scholarship. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor 
Society awards to the freshman who maintains the highest scholastic 
average during her first year in college a scholarship valued at $100. 
The Society reserves the riglit to withhold or to change the value of 
the award if circumstances require adjustment. 

The Perry-Harris Scholarship. A $200 scholarship given by Dr. 
Julia TTnmlet Harris in memory of hor mother, Mrs. Ella Perry 
Harris, to a student who has comj)leted one year of study at Meredith 
in the upper fifth of her class. Preference will be given to a student 
majoring or planning to major in English. 



24 MEKEDITH COLLEGE 

The Ruth Ann Huhhell Creative Writing Award. The interest 
on $500, the gift of Miss Hubbell, an alumna, will be given each year 
to that student whose work submitted in competition for the award 
gives best evidence of ability and sustained interest in creative writing. 
Details may be obtained from the Department of English. 

Lillie Grandy Scholarship) Fund. Granted under the will of the 
late Miss Lillie Grandy of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, the income 
from this fund makes available for the year 1963-'64, eight $300.00 
scholarships. Applicants must be residents of Camden County or 
Pasquotank County, liorth Carolina, and must have completed the first 
year at Meredith College and "have proven to the faculty during their 
freshman year that they have intellectual ability and sterling character." 
These scholarships may be renewed during the junior and senior years 
if in the judgment of the faculty the recipients prove themselves 
worthy. Applications should be submitted to the Chairman of the 
Scholarship Committee. 

College Loan Funds. Earnings from the funds listed are available 
for loan purposes to students in residence. Inquiries should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. V. Howard Belcher, Business Manager and Treasurer, 
Meredith College. 

The Elizabeth Avery Colton Loan Fund 

The Louis M. Curtis Loan Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. O. S. Goodwin Loan Fund 

The Mabel L. Haynes Loan Fimd 

The John M. "W. Hicks Loan Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs^ John Billingsley Ingram Loan Fund 

The Henrietta S. Jarman Loan Fund 

The Edna Tyner Langston Loan Fund 

The Helen Josephine Neal Loan Fund 

The Olive Chapel Loan Fund 

The "William H. Eeddish Loan Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Stanback Loan Fund / 

The "W. A. Thomas Student Loan Fund 

The National Defense Student Loan Program. The National 
Defense Education Act provides for the creation, at American Colleges 
and Universities, of loan fimds for which needy students may borrow 
on reasonable terms for the purpose of completing their higher 
education. This act requires that special consideration be given to 
students with superior academic backgrounds who intend to teach 
in public elementary or secondary schools or those whose academic 
background indicates superior capacity or preparation in science, 
mathematics, or a modern foreign language. Students interested in 
knowing more about this loan program should consult Mr. V. H. 
Belcher, Business Manager and Treasurer, Meredith College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 25 

The Ida Poteat Loan Fund. This fund has been provided for 
juniors and seniors through the alumnae of the College. Application 
blanks will be furnished upon request addressed to Miss Mae Grimmer, 
Alumnae Secretary, Meredith College. 

Self-Help. Many students needing financial assistance reduce 
their expenses by part-time employment in the dining room, in the 
library and in various offices and academic departments of the college. 
Compensation varies with the character and amount of service rendered, 
but usually ranges from $125 to $250 for the year. Initial correspond- 
ence may be addressed to the President or to the Business Manager. 
Available appointments will be made on the basis of apparent ability 
and need. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1963 



During the summer of 1963 the College will operate a six-week 
term beginning June 10 and ending July 20. Admission to the 
summer session is on the same basis as in the regular year. Graduates 
of accredited high schools who are planning to enter college in Septem- 
ber may begin some regular courses here in June. Attendance at the 
summer session will enable a student to complete her work in less 
than the usual time. The maximum amount of credit is six semester 
hours for the simimer session (i.e., three hours each for two courses 
meeting daily). 

Regular academic courses will be available in several fields of 
instruction, including music. Private lessons may be arranged in this 
field. 

Full information about the summer session may be obtained by 
writing to the Dean of the College. 



ADMISSION 

Students may be admitted to Meredith College as candidates for 
the degree of Baelielor of Aits either as members of the freshman. 
class or as students with advanced standing from other colleges. 
Before being accepted, candidates must present credentials giving 
satisfactory evidence that in scholarship, health, and character they 
are qualified for the educational program and standards maintained 
in this institution. 

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

Communications with regard to entrance should be addressed to 
the President of the College, who, upon request, will mail an application 
for admission. Applications, with the appropriate fee, should be re- 
turned to the President. 

Arrangements should be made by the applicant to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and the Writing Sample of the College 
Entrance Examination Board, details of which are given below. 
Not earlier than the close of the first semester for each freshman 
applicant the Dean will seciu-e from the proper school official a 
certified academic record showing units, grades, and rank in graduating 
class. It is at this time that the student applying for advanced 
standing should request a complete transcript of her college work be 
sent to Meredith. 

Each student will be notified concerning her admission as promptly 
as possible after records have been evaluated. WTien an applicant is 
notified that she qualifies academically for admission, she is then 
sent a medical form to be completed by her physician and also a 
dormitory placement sheet. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN 

Secondary School Work 

For admission to the freshman class, high school graduates must 
offer a minimum of sixteen units of credit. A unit represents a year's 
study of a subject in a secondary school, and is estimated to be 
equivalent to one-fourth of a full yeai-'s work. 

Of the sixteen units presented, four must be in English; nine 
must be chosen from language, history, social studies, mathematics 
and natural science ; three additional units are required in these 
subjects or from electives approved by Meredith College. If a foreign 
language is included, at least two units in one language must be 
presented. 

Each student applying for admisoion from a secondary school 
must rank in the upper half of her graduating class. It is to be 
noted that three-fourths of the freshmen entering in September ranked 
in the upper quarter of their graduating classes. 

(26) 



ADMISSION 27 

College Board Examinations 

All applicants including transfer students are expected to take 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board, and the Writing Sample given as a part of the afternoon tests. 
Applicants to Meredith are urged to complete these tests in either 
December or January. The applicant's total high school record, her 
rank in the graduating class, several recommendations, and, wherever 
possible, a personal interview are important considerations. 

For 1963-'64, the three-hour Scholastic Aptitude Test, administered 
at several centers in each state, will be given during the morning 
on the following dates : 

Saturday, December 7, 1963 Saturday, March 7, 1964 

Saturday, January 11, 1964 Saturday, May 2, 1964 

Wednesday, July 8, 1964 

The student should write as soon as possible directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N. J., and 
request a Bulletin of Information and a descriptive booklet, both 
publications obtainable without charge. (These publications often 
may be obtained from high sehool officials.) The Bulletin gives 
detailed information about fees ($5.00 for the morning test, $2.00 for 
the Writing Sample) ; the cities where the examination centers are 
located ; and dates when applications are to be returned for each 
date listed above. The descriptive booklet, entitled A Description of 
the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test, gives a brief description 
of the test and sample test questions. 

Each student considering Meredith should indicate on the test 
application card that she wishes the report of her scores sent to 
Meredith College, Kaleigh, N. C. 

EARLY DECISION PLAN 

For the unquestionably well-qualified student who definitely desires 
to enter Meredith College there is designed an Early Decision Plan. 
Under this plan the applicant must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
of the College Entrance Examination Board before her senior year 
in high school. She should file application for admission to the College, 
with the appropriate fee, by September 15 of her senior year, requesting 
in an accompanying letter that her application receive an "early de- 
cision" and certifying that she is, therefore, applying only to Meredith. 
On the basis of Junior year test scores, the applicant's three-year high 
school record, together with a notice of courses being pursued in the 
senior year and recommendations from school officials, the admissions 
officer will accept the qunlified applicant by October 15 of her senior 
year. Dormitory students will be requested to make nn advance pay- 
ment of $50.00 by November 15. This advance payment is not 
refundable. 



28 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

If, however, credentials do not justify early acceptance, the 
applicant will be notified in the fall either that her application has 
been rejected or that action on the application will be deferred until 
the spring semester. In the latter case students will be asked to repeat 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test and to enroll for the Writing Sample 
on the December or January testing date; and they will, of course, 
be free to file applications at other institutions if they desire. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED STANDING 

A student applying for advanced standing should present the 
following information: (a) an official transcript of her record, in- 
cluding a statement of honorable dismissal, from the institution last 
attended; (b) details of the units offered for college entrance and the 
name of the high school from which the entrance units were received; 
(c) satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board; (d) a Writing Sample of the College 
Entrance Examination Board taken during the academic year im- 
mediately prior to entering Meredith. 

Students who have completed two years of college work should 
indicate the major and other subjects which they expect to pursue. 
Students admitted from other colleges with fewer quality points than 
semester hours of credit must make up the deficiency at Meredith 
College. 

When the candidate comes from a college belonging to the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools, or an association of related 
rank, she will be given credit for the courses acceptable toward 
a degree at Meredith College. 

Candidates from other colleges will be given provisional credits 
which must be validated by success in work undertaken at Meredith 
College, or by examinations. In order to validate the provisional 
credit allowed a student from a non-accredited institution, other; than 
by examination, she must make a minimum of twenty-four semester 
hours and twenty-four quality points during her first two semesters 
at Meredith. A student who fails to reach this standard will have 
her provisional credits reduced in number by the deficiency in hoorB 
or quality points. 

The maximum credit accepted from a junior college is sixty-two 
semester hours. Not more than thirty-two semester hours will be 
accredited for the work of either year in a junior college. 

A student transferring to Meredith at the beginning of the junior 
year will be expected to take at Meredith at least twelve hours in 
the department in which she is a major. A student transferring at 
the beginning of the senior year will be expected to take at Meredith 
at least nine hours in the department in which she is a major. 



ADMISSION 29 

RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student desiring to return to the College after an absence of 
more than a year should apply to the Pean for re-admission. Official 
transcripts of record at all other institutions should be submitted, 
together with a statement of honorable dismissal. Such a student wiU 
comply with the requirements either of the catalogue under which 
she is re-admitted, or of a subsequent catalogue. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Part-time students are understood to be those qualifying for a 
degree who enroll for not more than nine credit hours a semester. 
Such students will meet the entrance requirements outlined above. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

A student of mature age who gives evidence of a serious pui-pose 
and who is otherwise properly qualified is allowed to enter a special 
course without fulfilling the entrance requirements. All such courses 
must be approved by the Dean and the instructor concerned, but will 
not receive college credit. 

ORIENTATION-REGISTRATION 

All students, upon arrival in the city, should enroll promptly 
at the office of the Dean of Students. Dormitories will be open to 
receive freshmen and transfer students at 2 :00 p.m. on Monday, 
September 9. The orientation and registration program begins at 
8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, September 10. Returning students should ar- 
rive in time to complete their registration by 3 :00 p.m. on Friday, 
September 13. All students who fail to complete registration on the 
date specified must pay a special fee of two dollars. 

All freshmen and all transfer students are expected to take part 
in the special program arranged for the opening week. Included iu 
this program will be a physical examination, instruction in the use 
of the library, social activities and achievement tests, English and 
language placement tests, registration, and talks on various phases 
of college life. 



ACADEA\1C REGULATIONS 

Meredith College confers two degrees, that of Bachelor of Arts 
and that of Bachelor of Music. To be eligible for a degree, a: student 
must meet the academic requirements for the degree and must be a 
person of unquestionably good character.^ 

The requirements for these degrees are based on the general 
principle of a broad distribution of studies among the representative 
fields of human culture and a concentration of studies within a special 
field. The object of distribution is to give the student a general view 
of our cultural heritage and to broaden her outlook. The object of 
concentration is to aid the student in acquiring comprehensive knowl- 
edge and systematic training in a particular field of scholarly achieve- 
ment. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Hours: A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts mnst 
complete at least 120 semester hours of work. Each semester hour 
of credit is supposed to represent for the average student three hours 
of academic work a week, including preparation, classes and labora- 
tories. 

Residence: Every candidate for the degree must attend Meredith 
College for one full year, with not less than thirty semester hours of 
credit. If she enters from a senior college not approved by the 
Southern Association or by an association of related rank, she must 
attend for at least two years. The last thirty semester hours must 
be taken at Meredith College, except that not more than six^ semester 
hours may be taken at another institution of approved standing.* 

A student who completes the work required by the College for 
the Bachelor's degree will be granted the degree at the end of that 
session. 

Grades: The College requires that all students maintain at < least 
an average gi-ade of C in: 

1. All grades of courses offered for graduation. 

2. All grades of courses completed at Meredith. 

3. All grades of coiu'ses completed at Meredith in the field of 
concentration. 



' A student may elect to follow the degree requlrementB listed In any subsequent 
catalogue in force during her period of residence. 

• See exception, P. 34. 

• These exceptions do not apply to senior transfer students. 

(30) 



ACADEMIC REGUI^TIONS 31 

4. All grades of courses completed at Meredith iu the major 
subject. 

5. All grades of courses completed in the senior year. 

I. Prescribed Courses 

To be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, a 
candidate must have completed 52 to 69 hours from the prescribed 
courses listed below. These course requirements should be met by the 
end of the junior year. 

Semester 
Hours 

Art or Music. Art 231, 359, 360 or Music 101 and 102 or 226 3-6 

Students majoring in art or music will be excused from this re- 
quirement. Those majoring in home «?conomics may substitute Art 
262. 

Enpliah. English 101-102, English 221-222 12 

Foreign Language 6-18 

Bigh School Units Offered College Requirementt 

None 18 hrs. in one language or 

12 his. in each of two 

Two units In one language 12 hrs. In any language 

Two units in each of two languages 6 hrs. iu one of these or 

12 hrs. in a third language 

Four units in one language 6 hrs. in that language 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences 12-14 

Blolog>- 101-102; Chemistry 101-102; Mathematics 101, 102; Physics 
221-222. 

Social Studies 12 

History 101-102 and six hours chosen from the following: Economics 
221, 222; Geography 221, 222; Political Science 221. 222; Psychology 
221 ; Sociology 221, 222. Transfer students entering with six semester 
hours in Euroijean or ancient history will have met the requirement 
In history. Majors in Home Economics may substitute Sociology 374 
for Sociology 222. 

Religion. Religion 201, 202 6 

Bealth Education. Health Education 101 or 102 1 

Students triinsf erring to Meredith College us juniors or seniors will be 
excused from this roquirement. 

Physical Education 

Only one course in physical edncatlou will be roiiuired during any one 
semester except for the student who failed a course in physical education 
the previous semester. Students enrolled for Physical Education 386 may 
substitute this for an activity course for that semester. 



32 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Students entering Meredith must successfully complete physical educa- 
tion courses according to tlie following program — unless excused by the 
Dean: 

Those entering as first-year students — three years 
Those entering as second-year students — two years 
Those entering as third-year students — one year 

II. Field of Concentration 

Each student will select a field of concentration consisting of at least 
forty-two semester hours distributed as follows : eighteen to twenty-four 
semester hours in a major subject and twenty-four to eighteen semester 
hours in one or two related subjects, with a minimum of six semester 
hours in a subject. The field of concentration may not include any 
courses open primarily to freshmen. Eequired courses not open pri- 
marily to freshmen may count as a part of the field of concentration. 

Concentration in a field of study is intended to be more than a 
series of unrelated courses listed in the catalogue under several depart- 
ments. The work required of each student in a field of concentration 
should be planned by the major department as a unified, coherent whole, 
consisting of closely related courses. The requirements of a depart^ 
mental major in a field of concentration are listed under each depart- 
ment. Without consent of the administrative council, a student may 
not change her major subject after becoming a senior. 

Not later than the close of the sophomore year, a candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts shall select a departmental major. 
When this selection has been approved by the department concerned, 
the head of that department becomes the adviser of the student. The 
program of studies arranged by the head of the department and the 
student must receive the final approval of the dean. 

The major must be selected from the following list of subjects: 

Art History \ 

Biology Home Ii)conomics ' 

Business Mathematics 

Chemistry Music 

Economics Psychology and Philosophy 

English Religion 

Foreign Languages — French, Sociology 
Latin, Spanish 

The related subject or subjects may be selected either from the 
above list of major subjects or from the following list of subjects: 

Elementary Education Philosophy 

Geography Political Science 

German Speech 



ACADEMIC BEGULATIONS 



33 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Music will be granted to students who 
already hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and 
meet the requirements as stated on page 66 of the catalogue. One 
additional year of study confined exclusively to music will usually be 
necessary to secure this degree. 



During their course of study, students will be expected to conform 
to the regulations for seniors, including class attendance and scholastic 
attainment. 

THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

Usually freshmen register for the following courses : English, a 
foreign language, health education, physical education, and thr^ 
courses chosen from history, mathematics, natural sciences, and religion. 
Some variation from this schedule may be necessary for students plan- 
ning to major in art, home economics or music. 

The sixteen hours normally to be taken each semester should be 
chosen from the following courses : 



Art 101, 102 
Biology 101-102 
Chemistry 101-102 
English 101-102 
French 101-102; 221-222 
German 101-102; 221-222 
H<'alth Education 



History 101-102 
Home Economics 101, 104 
Latin 101-102: 221-222 
Mathematics 101, 102 
Music (See Department) 
Religion 101, 102 
Spanish 101-102; 221-222 



REGULATIONS CONCERNING COURSES 

Registration and Withdrawal. As every student schedule must 
be approved by the Dean, a student may enter or withdraw from a 
course only on his authority. 

A student may be permitted by the Dean to drop a course during 
the first six weeks of a semester without penalty. Thereafter she will 
receive an F grade on the course if that grade represents the quality of 
work done for the period. 

Amount of Work. No regular student is permitted to take fewer 
than fourteen semester hours of claaswork a week without permission 
of the Dean, except that under the following conditions students may 
register for only twelve hours : seniors enrolled for the course in super- 
vised teaching; a music major with a recital to prepare; a student in 
poor health or one engaged in outside work that demands much of her 
time. 

No student may register for more than sixteen hours if she failed 
to make an average grade above C for the preceding semester. 



84 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

The maximuin number of credit hours allowed during any 
semester for any student taking physical education is eighteen; for 
other students the maximum is nineteen hours. 

Prescribed Courses. Prescribed courses take precedence over 
elective courses in the schedule of work for a semester. 

During her freshman and sophomore years a student may not 
take concurrently two courses in the same department without the 
permission of the Dean. 

Students who do not complete the foreign language requirement 
in the freshman year must continue language study until the require- 
ment is met. 

Restricted Credit for Juniors and Seniors. Twelve hours of 
credit in courses primarily for freshmen may be taken in the junior 
and senior years, not more than six hours of which may be taken 
during the senior year. 

Credit in Music. A maximum of twenty-four semester hours in 
music may be counted by students not majoring in music as elective 
credits towards the Bachelor of Arts degree. All such credit in applied 
music must be validated by equal credit (with a grade of C or better) 
in courses selected from Theory or History and Literature. 

A maximum credit of four semester hours is allowed all students 
in ensemble courses — chorus or orchestra. This credit need not be 
substantiated by work in theoretical music. 

Maximum Credit in a Subject. The maximum amount of work 
that a student may take in any one subject, other than the Department 
of Music, is forty hours. Students having a major in the Department 
of Music may take a maximum of sixty semester hours from the various 
subdivisions of that department. 

Repeating Courses. A course may be repeated only if the student 
registers for the course the next time it is offered. If this is impossible 
because of schedule conflict with another required course, the student 
must register with the Dean her intention of taking the course as soon 
as there is no conflict with any other required course. 

Correspondence Credit. A maximum credit of six semester hours 
may be allowed for correspondence courses (with a grade of C or 
higher) after written permission has been obtained from the Dean. 

Deficiency in English. The Department of English may require 
special work in composition of a student who submits to any depart- 
ment a paper containing gross errors in English composition. 

Final Work for a Degree. T^ot more than six semester hours 
may be taken in another institution of approved standing as the final 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 8C 

work necessary for graduation, except in the case of four-hour courses, 
in which case eight hours of credit will be allowed. Such courses muBt 
be approved in advance by the Dean. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Students must be regular and prompt in their attendance at all 
classes, conferences, and other academic appointments. They must 
accept full responsibility for any announcements or assignments missed 
because of absence. Such absences, even when permitted, tend to lower 
a student's standing in courses. 

In each class during a semester as many absences will be allowed 
as there are class sessions per week. This ruling includes absences 
from classes, private lessons in music, and laboratory periods. This 
number will ordinarily suffice for absences due to illness as well as to 
other causes. 

Absences from class at the last session before or the first session 
after a holiday (except for sickness in the College infirmary, or off 
the campus with a statement from a physician, parent, or guardian) 
will be counted as two absences if these absences come within two 
days before or after a holiday. For a class meeting five days a week, 
two absences will be counted if the student is absent the day before 
the holiday. 

Absence because of illness— in the infirmary, or o£F the campus 
with a statement from a physician, parent or guardian — will be counted 
as one-third of an absence. For non-resident students a written eicusfi 
from parent or physician to cover absences from classes and chapel 
should be handed to the Registrar upon the student's return to classes. 
Absences due to extended illness may be excused at the discretion of the 
Dean. Absence caused by the serious illness or the death of a member 
of tlie immediate family will also be counted as one-third of an absence. 

When arranged for in advance by the Dean, a student on the 
eligibility list may have as many as three additional absences from 
each course, without penalty, to attend meetings of an officially 
recognized campus organization, to represent the College as a whole, 
or to participate in academic off-campus activities. 

Absences beyond the number allowed will be classiied as unexcused, 
and one qualitj' point or fraction thereof will be deducted from the 
total number of quality points for the semester for each absence or 
fractional absence unexcused. 

The following regulation will apply to students taking physical 
education activity courses: 

A student is required to attend at least 80% of the semester's 
class sessions in order to receive a passing grade in the course. 
Absences are thus provided for illness — except in the case of extended 
illness. 



36 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

In cases of extended illness, the Dean and the Department Head 
will confer with the infirmary, and make provision either to permit 
work to be made up, or to recommend that the student drop the 
course. 

All absences will be reported as usual to the Registrar, who, in 
turn will post these on the board with other absences. 

Students registered in Education 495 are granted two full days 
of absence from regular college classes beyond those provided for above. 

Students authorized by the Department of Education to do 
substitute teaching in the city schools may be excused from classes 
on that day. 

Students on the Dean's List and Seniors (academic classification) 
are granted optional class attendance except at the last session of a 
class before or the fii-st session after a holiday. If they have not 
incurred more than one absence from each class preceding a holiday, 
they are entitled to one absence from each class session immediately 
preceding or following the holiday. For class absences on these days 
in excess of this provision (except for sickness in the College infirmary, 
or oflF the campus with a statement from a physician, parent or 
guardian), quality points will be deducted from the total number of 
quality points earned that semester. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Each course receives one official semester grade, an evaluation 
of the entire work of the student during the semester. The grade 
of scholarship is reported in letters; A, B, C, and D indicate passing 
grades ; F indicates failure. A grade of Inc. indicates that the student's 
work is incomplete. If an Inc. is not completed during the next 
semester, it automatically becomes an F. ^ 

QUALITY POINTS 

The minimimi scholastic average of C, or a credit ratio of 1.0, 
required of a candidate for a degree, is determined by the quality 
points to which her course grades entitle her. Each semester hour 
with a grade of A carries three quality j)oints; B, two; C, one. 

Quality point deductions made because of excessive class absences 
will be applied in computing the total number of quality points for 
graduation, for Dean's List standing, for eligibility, and for retention. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 37 

ELIGIBILITY LIST 

The requirements for inclusion on the eligibility list as stated 
by the Faculty Committee on Student Government are as follows: 

1. That a student should have been registered for at least twelve 
hours of work (with the exception of seniors who are engaged 
in their supervised teaching) ; 

2. That she should have completed and passed all courses with 
an overall average of C or better for the preceding semester; 

3. That her conduct be approved by the Dean of Students. 

DEAN'S LIST 

At the end of each semester there is published a Dean's List of 
students who have attained high scholastic standing. In this list are 
names of students registered for at least twelve hours. They should 
have completed and passed all courses with a number of quality points 
equal to twice the number of semester hours taken plus three. 

A student may be removed by the Dean from this list during the 
semester if her conduct or grades are such as to make removal advisable. 

GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts with distinction is conferred upon 
a student under the following conditions : 

(1) A student must have been in residence at Meredith College 
at least two years and must have earned a minimum of fifty- 
seven semester hours. 

(2) For the purpose of computing the standing of a student all 
semester hours taken for degree credit at Meredith College 
are counted. 

(3) Those whose average is two and two-tenths quality points per 
semester hour are graduated cum laude; those whose average 
is two and seven-tenths quality points per semester hour are 
graduated magna cum laude; those whose average is two and 
nine-tentlis quality points per semester hour are graduated 
summa cum laude. 

No student shall be graduated with distinction unless her grades 
on all her college work, including any taken at other colleges, meet 
the required standards set up for such honors. 



38 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

CLASSIFICATIOISr 

Students ai-e classiiied at tlie beginning of each semester. To 
be classified as a sophomore, a student must have at least twenty-three 
semester hours of credit and sixteen quality points; to be classified 
as a junior, at least fifty-six hours of credit and fifty quality points; 
to be classified as a senior, at least eighty-six hours of credit and 
eighty-four quality points. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Final examinations are held in all courses at the end of each 
semester. No credit should be expected for a course if the examination 
is not taken as scheduled, unless another date is authorized by the 
Dean and the instructor concerned. A special fee will be charged for 
individual examinations thus allowed. 

Seniors have examinations at the same time as other students, 
except that seniors who have examinations on the last Thursday and 
Friday of the second semester will take them on the preceding Thursday 
and Friday. 

At the end of each semester a report is sent to the parent or 
guardian of a student, showing her grade of scholarship and absences 
from classes. 

RETENTION OF STUDENTS 

During each semester of her first college year a student must pass 
at least six semester hours. However, in order to continue beyond her 
first college year, a student must have passed a minimum of fifteen 
hours. She must, also, have passed enough additional hours, or 
have accumulated enough quality points, so that the total of semester 
hours and quality points is at least twenty-four. 

After the first year in college a student must pass a minimftm of 
nine semester hours each semester. Unless she has also accumulated 
nine quality points for the same semester, she will be placed on 
academic probation for the following semester. Probationary status 
will not be permitted for two successive semesters. A written notice 
of such probation will be sent to the parents and to the student. 

Before a student is permitted to register for her third college 
year she must have accumulated, during regular and summer sessions, 
a minimum of forty-four semester hours and thirty-eight quality 
points. 

A student who does not meet these minimum requirements will be 
dropped from the College for one semester. She may apply for re- 
admission either by submitting a transcript of work completed at 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 39 

another approved institution or in some other way demonstrating to 
the College authorities that she is qualified to continue at Meredith. 
Summer school credits, while encouraged, will not be considered as 
the equivalent of one full semester of regular college work. 

The College reserves the right to exclude at any time a student 
whose academic standing or conduct it regards as undesirable, without 
the necessity of preferring specific charges against her. 



VOCATIONAL PREPARATION 

The College ofFers certain phases of vocational education on the 
college level and not in competition with the purely professional and 
vocational schools. Students may enter, among others, the following 
fields : 

1. Business 5. Religion 

2. Graduate Study 6. Social "Welfare 

3. Library Work 7. Teaching 

4. Medicine, Medical Technology, a. Elementary 

Nursing b. Secondary 

The College offers courses of instruction leading to a major in 
Business. This course is not open to freshmen. This training qualifies 
students to hold positions in the business world. Courses in shorthand 
and typewriting are also available (without credit) to prospective 
librarians, religious and social workers, teachers, or other students not 
majoring in business. 

Students planning to enter professional schools or to do graduate 
work after leaving Meredith should secure advance information about 
the requirements which they must satisfy. The Dean of the College 
will be glad to assist the individual student, in keeping with the 
degree requirements of this institution, to plan her course of study 
with these aims in view. 

In the natural sciences, fully accredited pre-professional coursea 
are offered for laboratory technicians, nurses, and students of medicine. 

The Department of Religion trains teachers of Bible and personnel 
for association and local church work. 

Because of the increasing demand for various types of trained 
social workers, the curriculum has been expanded to include all 
prerequisites for professional training at accredited schools of social 
work. 



40 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

SUMMER SESSION CREDITS 

A student who plans to attend a summer session at another 
accredited college should make application for transfer credit through 
the Dean's office. She will also secure the written approval of appro- 
priate heads of departments for courses she plans to take. The 
maximum credit allowed for a summer term is on the basis of one 
semester hour per week. Eligibility status is not affected by summer 
session credits. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Official withdrawal of resident students is made in the office 
of the Dean of Students. Withdrawal of non-resident students is 
made in the office of the Dean of the College. 

Failure to make official withdrawal forfeits the right of honorable 
dismissal. 



COURSES or INSTRUCTION 

A course with an odd number is given the first semester ; a course with an 
even number, the second semester. If an S follows the odd number, the 
course is repeated in the second semester; if an F follows the even number, 
the course- is also offered in the first semester. 

A course with two numbers continues throughout the year. If the numbers 
are connected with a hyphen, no permanent credit is allowed until the full 
year's work is completed. 

Courses are numbered as follows : the 100 courses for freshmen, the 200 
courses for sophomores, the 300 courses for juniors and seniors. The 400 
courses are for seniors only except by special permission. 

Brackets enclosing the nimiber and title of a course indicate that the 
course is not given for the current year. 

The College does not guarantee to offer any course listed below for which 
there is not a minimum registration of five students. 

A "block" course is taught for the first halt of a semester, six days a 
week. Student teaching under supervision is scheduled for the second half 
of either semester. 

ART 

Lucy Bane Jeffries, Assistant Professor 

Arthur C. Downs, Assistant Professor 

Josephine C. Bond, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major : a total of thirty hours in Art including 
101-102, 221, 222, .359, 360, and 49S. 

101-102. BEGINNING DRAWING AND COMPOSITION Credit, Six Hours 
Six studio hours a week. 

An introductory course in basic design. Emphasis is placed upon the 
elements and principles of design with particular attention to drawing and 
composition in the fall semester and to the use of color in the spring semester. 
Studio problems involve the use of a variety of materials. Through group 
and Individual criticism, the development of individual creative ability Is 
eDcourai;ed. 

Prerequisite for Art 102 : Art 101 or Art 243. 

Credit for Art 101 given upon completion of Art 102, Ed. 386A 

or Art 3(J2. Mrs. Jeffries 

221, 222. CREATIVE DESIGN Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 

A course ofTering the student an opportunity to develop creatlveness In 
two and three-dimensional design and technical ability in the use of various 
materials. Mr. Downs 

226. CERAMICS Credit, Three Hours 

An Introductory course In ceramic processes and materlaU Projects In 
coll, slab, and wheel methods of construction. Experimentation with various 
types of decorntlon. 

Not open to freshmen except by special permission. Mr. Downs 

(41) 



42 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

229. ADVANCED DRAWING Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 
Problems in sketching, ligure drawing, illustration and perspective 
drawing. Mr. Downs 

231, 231S. ART APPRECIATION Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to satisfy the need of students for a key to 
the enjoyment of art. Through Illustrated lectures and class discussions, 
the art of past cultures and modern times is introduced to the student. Not 
open to art majors. Mr. Downs 

243. BEGINNING ART Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
A course iu the fundamentals of art for others than art majors. Con- 
sideration of the elements .nnd principles of design and their application In 
problems involving various art media. Mrs. Jeffries 

257S. ELEMENTARY SCULPTURE Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

An introductory course in modeling and construction of three-dimensional 

subjects. Emphasis is placed upon the creative phase of sculpturing and 

upon technical process and techniques. Mr. Downs 

347, 348. BEGINNING PAINTING Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite : Art 101-102 or by special permission. 
A studio course in creative painting in various media including casein, 
watercolor, and oil. Mrs. Jeffries 

359. HISTORY OF ANCIENT ART Credit, Three Hours 
A survey of the signilicaiit art of the East and West from prehistoric 

times to the Ren.Tissance. Mr. Downs 

360. HISTORY OF MODERN ART Credit, Three Hours 
A survey of the principal trends of sculpture, painting and architecture 

from the Renaissance of the present. Mr. Downs 

362. INTERIOR DECORATION Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
A course to familiarize t)u; student with historical and contemporary 
home furnishing and ileoorntidu. Studio problems and interior design. 

(Will not be offered, 1964-'65) Mrs. Bond 

Ed. 3S6A. METHODS IN THE TEACHING OF ART Credit, Three Hours 
Two lectures and four studio hours a week. 
Section a. For Elementary Education Teachers 

Prerequisite: Art 101', Art 243, or permission of the department. 
Section b. For Art Majors 

Prerequisite : 12 hours of Art. 

A study of the aims of art in the school and its place in ihe integral 

program ; practice in art problems for the classroom teacher, together with 

the selection and preparation of illustrative material to meet the needs of 

pupils of different grade levels. Mrs. Jeffries 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 

453, 454. ADVANCED PAINTING Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Sis studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 347, 348. 

Mrs. Jeffries 

466. COMMERCIAL ART Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 
A course for the student interested in the nature and application of art 
materials for the commercial art field. Illustration, fashion drawinR, window 
display, and advertising art are among the projects covere<l. Mr. Downs 

491. STUDIO PROBLEMS Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to permit advanced practice and research by art 
majors in their fields of special interest. Painting, sculpture, design, interior 
decoration, or materials and methods of teaching art are suggested fields 
of study. These courses must be scheduled by special arrangement with 
the department head. Staff 

498. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

A study and review group meeting with the staff to consider current 

problems, advanced techniques, ami other problems related to art. 

Required of all art majors in their senior year. Preparation for the 

exhibition required of all senior majors is made in this class. 

Mrs. Jeffries 

BIOLOGY 

John A. Yarbrough, Professor 

James IT. Eads, Assistant Professor 

Helen P. Kelman, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major : twenty-seven semester hours, including 
Biology 101-102, 221, 222, 351 and 304. Other requirements include Chemistry 
101-102, 221, Matliematics 101, 102 or their equivalent. Ed. 385 Se. does not 
count toward Uw major. 

101-102. GENERAL BIOLOGY Credit. Six hours 

Two lectures, one conference and two laboratory hours a week. 
A course presenting the most important biological facts nrn\ principlee, 
and so relating them that the student can apply them to the ordinary affairs 
of life. A stu<Iy of protoplasm, the cell, the role of greon plants, including 
simple experiments in plant physiology, the adjustment of organisms to their 
environment, and tlic structure and functions of vertebrates with special 
reference to man constitutes the work of the first semester. During the 
second semester a study of typical nalmal and plant forms is made as an 
Introduction to these two kingdoms. Staff 

221. GENERAL BOTANY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six laboratory or 
field-trip hours a week. 
A study of the morphological and physiological aspects of the seed plants 
followed by a survey of the major groups of the plant kingdom. 

Mr. Yarbrough 



44 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

222. GENERAL ZOOLOGY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerf quisite : Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six laboratory 

hours a week. 

A phylo^enetic survey of the entire animal kingdom with weighted 

emphasis on invertebrates. Both type animals and transitional forms are 

studied as to life hi.story, morphology, physiology and economic importance. 

Mr. Eads 

[351. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102 ; Biology 222 recommended. Two 

lectures and six laboratory hours a week. 

A course dealing with the moriihology, anatomy, and development of the 

various vertebrate organs and systems of organs. Various vertebrate types. 

Including fi.'!h. amphibia, and mammals to be dissected in the laboratory. 

Alternates with 353. Mr. Eads 

353. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102, Chemistry 101-102. Especially adapted 
to students preparing to study medicine or nursing, or to become 
technicians. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory a week. 
Anatomy to be studied only so far as it is necessary to understand the 
functions of the different systems of the body. Laboratory work to include 
study of muscles and nervous systems of other animals, and simple experi- 
ments. Mr. Eads 
Alternates with 351. 

[354. HISTOLOGY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102. Especially 

adapted to students preparing to study medicine or nursing, or to 

become teshnieians. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. 

The first lialf of the course is devoted to slide preparation, employing 

plant and animal tissues. The paraffin method is emphasized, with some 

attention to the celloidin and freezing techniques. The second half consists 

of a careful microscopic analysis of the common animal tissues. 

Alternates with 356. Mr. Yarbrough 

255. GENETICS Credit, Three ^ours 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102 or its equivalent. Three lectures a 
week. 
Designed chiefly for a thorough presentation of modern genetic principles 
and with examples from plant and animal breeding. Attempts are also 
made to apply such information in sociological and psychological considera- 
tions and in human well-being. Mr. Eads 

356. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six laboratory 
hours a week. 
Laborntory study of maturation, fertilization, segmentation, formation of 

germ layers, origin of characteristic vertebrate organs in representative forms. 

Si)ecial emphasis placed on the chick and pig in laboratory, and oiitslde 

readings to show comparative stages in other vertebrates. 

Alternates with 354. Mr. Eads 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 45 

[359. PLANT ANATOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102 and 221. One lecture and six 
laboratory hours a week. 
A study of cellular units of seed plants, including both woody and 

herbaceous types. Mr. Yarbrough 

364. MICROBIOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

Recommended for home economics majors. Elective for others. 
Prerequisite : Biology 101 and Chemistry 101-102 or their equiva- 
lents. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. 
A general study of bacteria, yeasts, and molds, with emjihasis on the 
applicati-in of the principles of bacteriology to everyday life. Laboratory 
work to include culture and staining techniques ; principles of sterilization 
and disinfection: bacteriological examination of air, water, and milk, and 
experiments on fermentation. Mr. Yarbrough 

[366. PLANT TAXONOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102. One lecture and six laboratory or 
field-trip hours a week. 
A study of the external morphology, identification, classification, and dis- 
tribution of the .seed plants in the vicinity. Mr. Yarbrough 

Ed. 385 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit Three Hours 

See page 54. Miss Yarbrough and Mr. Yarbrough 

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Lois Frazier, Professor 
Evelyn P. Simmons, Instructor 
Ruth B. Robinson, Instructor 

The Department of Business and Economics offers a mujor in business 
and a major in economics. Students liave a choice of counting certain 
designated courses for credit as either business or economics. 

Courses in this department are not open to freshmen. 



BUSINESS 

Requirements for a major in business: 21 hours exclusive of 2;!l-2.'52. 
The following courses are n-iiuired : :«;i-;!.'>l, .'iOI, .'!G2, ;i6;?, 47:5, and 483. 
Business majors must take nine hours of economics, including 221 and 222. 

In addition to these course rcQuiroments. each business major is expected 
to present evidence of having completed forty hours of api)roved, paid work 
experience. 

Credit for Business 231-232 and 353-354 is restricted to business majors. 

231-232. TYPEWRITING Credit. Six Hours 

Development of typewriting skill and it^ n|)plication to business letters, 
mimuscrlpts, tabulation [jroblcnis, and office foinis. A rate of 50 words a 
minute is requlrcil. (.Students who Siitisfaclorily pass iiii examination given 
by tb<' df'iiinliiiciit, imludin:; the lypliij; :it llic nili- of -10 net wiirds a minute, 
may enroll in Business 2.'52 without having completed Business 231.) 

Mrs. Robinson 



46 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

353-354. ELEMENTARY SHORTHAND Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite or parallel: Business 231-232. 

Principles of Gregg STiorthand; development of skill to take dictation 

at 80 words a minute for five minutes on new material and produce acceptable 

transcripts. Mrs. Robinson 

361, 36-;. ACCOUNTING Credit, Six Hours 

Accounting for simple proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations ; 

classification of accounts; analysis of financial statements; payroll and tax 

problems. Miss Frazier 

363. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION AND REPORTS Credit, Three Hours 

Effective written and oral communication in business ; composition of 

adjustment, credit, collection, and sales letters; preparation of business 

reports. Miss Frazier 

375, 376. PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the histoi-y, policies, and methods of retail distribution ; 

organization; store operation; control practices; personnel management; 

merchandising ; advertising ; and sales promotion. Miss Frazier 

377. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 101. 
Fundamentals of statistics; sources, collection, analysis, and interpreta- 
tion of data ; and the use of statistical techniques. Mrs. Simmons 

381. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to legal principles applied to contracts, negotiable 
Instruments, bailments, sales, property, insurance, torts, and bankruptcy. 

Miss Frazier 

473, 474. ADVANCED SHORTHAND Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite : Business 353-354 or the equivalent. 
Review of shorthand theory, further development of dictation and tran- 
scription skiU ; special attention to mailable transcripts. Mrs. Robinson 

483, 484. OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND PRACTICE Credit, Six Hours 
Prerequisite : Business 231-232. ' 

Prlneiples of management applied to offices. Emphasis on office organi- 
zation ; personnel relations ; selection and proper use of office supplies and 
equipment; methods of filing; operation of transcribing machines, duplicating 
machines, adding mar:hines, and calculators. Miss Frazier 

(BLOCK COURSE] 

Ed. 386 B. THE TEACHING OF BUSINESS Credit, Three Hours 

See page 53. Miss Frazier 

492. WORK EXPERIENCE Credit, Three Hours 

Supervised experience in business offices two or three afternoons weekly. 

Conferences and remedial program for correction of deficiencies. For senior 

majors in business. Miss Frazier 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 47 

ECONOMICS 

Requirements for a major In economics : 24 hours in economics, including 
221 and 222. Economics 221 is a prerequisite to nil other courses In economics. 

221 and 221S. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Credit, Thrte Hours 

A study of the principles underlying the current American economic 
system. Including organization for production, money and banlsiug, business 
cycles and individual prices, international trade, and distribution of income, 
with macro emphasis. Mrs. Simmons 

222. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

A continuation of 221, with micro emphasis to include an examination 
of the marlict, prices, costs, the production process, various forms of competi- 
tion In the theory of the lirm, with detailed analysis of the factors of 
production. Mrs. Simmons 

355. ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the management of personal and family finances, consumer 

buying practices, tax problems, purchasing guides and protections, and 

selling techniques. Mrs. Simmons 

365. LABOR ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Economics 222. 
An analysis of American labor in a changing economic and social order; 
special emphasis upon trends in employment, labor organization, and standards 
in relation to technological change, state and federal labor legislation. 

Mrs. Simmons 

366. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 
A study of tlie development of international economic policies ; geographic, 

economic, social, and political factors underlying contemporary international 
problems; foreign exchange and money flows; economic competition; and 
the economic and political methods employed by the leading commercial 
nations. (Offered odd-numbered years only.) Mrs. Simmons 

368. PUBLIC FINANCE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Economics 222. 
A study of the sources of revenue and the principles and methods of 
taxation and tlnanclal administration; fiscal policy; debt maniigoment; 
and the principles governing expenditures. (Offered even-numbered years 
only.) Mrs. Simmons 

376. PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit. Three Hours 

(See Business 375) 

377. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prcre<iuislte : Mathematics 101 
(See Business 377) 

881. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

(See Business 381) 



48 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

385. MONEY AND BANKING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Economics 222. 
An examination of the value and purchasing power of money ; the role of 
commercial banks; the central banking system and its monetary controls; 
and the relationship between prices, production, employment, and economic 
growth. Special attention paid to current problems. Mrs. Simmons 



ass. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Credit, Three Hours 

A critical analysis of the development of economic ideas, their origins 
and institutional framework, with primary emphasis on an interpretative 
study of outstanding economists of the past whose contributions have 
significance for contemporary economic theory. Mrs. Simmons 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough, Professor 
Helen Jo Collins, Assistant Professor 

Requirements for a major in Chemistry : twenty-four semester hours 
from courses in Chemistry exclusive of 101-102 and Ed. 385 Sc. or 386 Sc. 



CHEMISTRY 

101-102. GENERAL CHEMISTRY Credit, Six Hours 

An introductory course in chemistry including qualitative analysis. 
Two class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Staff 



221, 222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four or Eight Hours 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 101-102. Three class hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 



351-352. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Credit, Eight Hours 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 101-102. Two class hours and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Mrs. Collins 



354. BIOCHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerefiuisite : Chemistry 221. Three class hours and one three-hour 
laboiarory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 49 

366. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 221, 222. Three class hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 



[Ed. 385 Sc. or 386 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours] 
See page 54. Miss Yarbrough 



491. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 351-352. Three class hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Mrs. CoUins 



[494. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 221, 222 ; Chemistry 351, 352 ; Physics 
221-222; Mathematics 2.32, 351. Two class hours and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Mrs. Collins 



498. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

Open only to majors In Chemistry. 



PHYSICS 

221-222. GENERAL PHYSICS Credit, Bight Hours 

Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Miss Yarbrough 



[354. HOUSEHOLD PHYSICS Credit, Three Hours] 

Two class hduis and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Miss Yurbruugh 



50 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

EDUCATION 

David R. Reveley, Professor 
Harry K. Doisett, Associate Professor 

Lila Bell, Assistant Professor 
Robert G. Fracker, Part-time Instructor 

All of the courses listed herein are designed primarily to prepare students 
who wish to teach in the public schools of the State. Students intending to 
teach should confer with the Department of Education in their freshman or 
sophomore year and so plan their program of work as to be sure that they 
will meet the requirements for the State Class A rertificatp. All teaching 
programs must be approved by the head of the Department of Education. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

students who expect to secure Class A certificates to teach in either 
the primary or the grammar grade level must meet the requirements listed 
below. 

/. Suhject-Matter Courses 

Semester Hoars 

Children's Literaturei 2 

American History 6 

Geography 6 

Political Science 2-3 

Art 6 

Music2 6 

Health Education 2 

Health Education MethodsS 2 

Physical Education Methods 2 

//. Professional Courses / 

Area I — The Pupil 

Education 231 and 353 6 

Area II— The School 

Education 357 and a choice of 465, 491, 492 6 

Area III — Teaching and Practicum 
Education 467 (4 hrs.) 

and 495 or 495S (6 hrs.) 10 



>The State Department of Public Instruction counts Children's Uterature as 

English, not as Education. 
• Students who completed Music Theory 101-102 should add Ed. 385 M. 
•The State Department recommends Biology 101-102 as a prerequisite. 



COUBSES OF INSTBUCTION 61 

fflGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTTFICATES 

students who expect to secure State Class A certificates to teacb in high 
school, must meet the requirements listed below. It Is recommended that 
students be able to teach at least two subjects in the high school. Mafors, 
related subjects, and electlves may be used to this end, hut it should he noted 
that the requirements for state certificates and the college requirements for 
majors do not alwai/s coincide. All teaching programs must be approved by 
the head of the Department of Education by the beginning of the junloJ 
year. 

/. Suhjert-Matter Courses 

A major and related courses should be selected from the following fields 
(the number of semester hours required for a certificate is Indicated In 
parenthesis) : 

Art (80), Bible (21), commerce (36), English (30), French (S4)l, German 
(24)1, history (social studies — 30), home economics (including certain 
sciences and other related courses) — (51), mathematics (21), public school 
music (including six semester hours in voice) — (36), science (30), sociology; 
social studies (30), Spanish (24)1. 

The following combinations are suggested: English-Latin, F!nglish- French- 
German, or Spanish, Rnglish-religion, history-mathematics, history-French- 
German, or Spanish, science-mathematics. 



JI. Frofcsulonal Courses 
Area I— The Pupil 

Education 231 and 456 6 semester hours 

Area II— The School 

Education 352 and choice of 465, 491, 402 6 semester hours 

Area III — Teaching and Practlcum 

Education 385 or 386, and 4.05 or 405S 9 semester honrs 

Note : Students are advised to take these courses In the following 
order : Education 231, 352, 385 or 386, 495. 



"The houm required In any torelsn lancuaB* are baaad upon two unlta of hlch aohooi 
work In tliat laneuag*. 



52 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

EDUCATION COURSES 

Education 231 is prerequisite to all Education courses except 342. 



231, 231S. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

A course Intended to be basic to the others In the various sequences 

■which give direction to the professionally trained teacher. Mr. Reveley 

Mr. Fracker 

342F or 342. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

An intensive historical review of children's literature, both American 
and European. Miss BeU 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

352P or 352. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 357. 
The bistorical development, and a consideration of the place and function 
of secondary education in our democracy ; the organization and administra- 
tion of the high school curriculum: methods of planning and teaching; 
qualifications of the high school teacher ; student guidance ; records and 
reports. Mr. Dorsett 

Prerequisite to student teaching on the high school level. 

353 or 353S. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 

Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite Ed. 231 or Psychology 221. 
A survey of the psychological development of the individual through 
childhood. Mr. Dorsett 

357, 357S. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 352. 
The historical development o( the elementary school ; qualifications of 
the elementary teacher ; the currii-ulum and co-curricular activities ; organi- 
zation and control; relation of teachers and pupils to one another: records 
and reports. Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

456F, 456. TESTING AND GUIDANCE Credit, Three Hours 

A consideration of child and adolescent intelligence, aptitude, achieve- 
ment, interest and personality tests used in the public schools, together with 
elementary statistical techniques involved in their application. 

Mr. Dorsett 
[BLOCK COURSE] 

465. FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 

The movements of educational thought and institutions which gave rise 
to the American school systems. Mr. Reveley 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

467, 467S. ELEMENTARY METHODS Credit, Four Hours 

A study of materials and methods of teaching In all subjects at the 
elementary school level. Directed observation ; units of work developed and 
evaluated. Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 



COUBSES OF INSTRUCTION 53 

491. SOCIAL, PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
Present-day confusion in education due to conflicting philosophies as to 

alms and objectives, curriculum content, methods of learning and teaching, 
and the range of formal education. The responsibility of the school in rela- 
tion to guidance, vocational interests, moral and character education, family 
life, and religion. Mr. Reveley 

492. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the philosophical bases of modern education, with particular 

reference to the philosophies of idealism, realism, and pragmatism. 

Mr. Reveley 
[BLOCK COURSE] 



SPECIAL METHODS COURSES 

Three semester hours of special methods in the field in which one Is 
planning to teach are expected for a high school certificate : six semester 
hours may be taken by those who wish a certificate to teach in two fields. 
In special methods courses students are introduced to aims, objectives, 
materials, and techniques of the teaching fields and levels of the State 
Course of Study. Lesson planning, practical demonstration, and actual 
observation of teaching of the various phases of the programs in the Raleigh 
City Schools and Wake County constitute a part of the courses. 

Prerequisite to all spt-cial methods courses : Education 231'. 

886A. ART EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 

(For description, see page 43) Mrs. .Jeffries 

386B. THE TEACHING OP BUSINESS Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Frazier 

885E. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Rose 

386 M.L. THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LAN(5UAGES 

Credit, Throe Hours 
Mr. McAllister 

882, 385 H. Ed. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH EDUCATION 

Credit, Two Hours 
Mrs. Snyder 

886. H. Ec. THE TEACHING OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Hanyen 

385M. THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Canaday 

885, 386 Mus. THE TEACHING OF MUSIC Credit, Throe or Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 102. Ko(iuired of juniors majoring in Public 
School Music. (For description see page 71) Miss Haeseler 

886 P. Ed. THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Credit, Two Hours 
Mr.1. Massey 



54 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

385 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Houre 

Miss Yarbrough 

386 S. St. THE TEACHING OF HISTORY AND SOCIAL STUDIES 

Credit. Three Hours 
Open to jmiiors and seniors taking a major in history or sociology. 

Miss Lemmon 

OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACfflNG 

495, 495S. STUDENT TEACHING Credit, Six Hours (either semester) 

The purpose of this course is to give the student actual teaching ex- 
perience. All student-teaching is on the block. Student-teachers will take 
advanced courses in education for the first nine weeks of the semester; 
during the last eight weeks they will be in the classroom for the entire 
day. The student will not take courses other than her courses in education 
during her semester of student-teaching. All high school student-teachers 
must have taken Education 231, Education 352, and Education 3S5 before the 
semester in which they do their student-teaching. All elementary student- 
teachers must have taken Education 231, Education 357, and Education 353 
before the semester in which they do their student-teiiching. The Depart- 
ment reserves the right to withhold the privilege of student-teaching If 
circumstances warrant. Staff 

(Pee $35) 

ENGLISH 

Mary Lynch Johnson, Professor 

Norma Rose, Professor 

lone Kemp Knight, Associate Professor 

Mamie Hafner, Assistant Professor 

Velma Mae Gorsage, Instructor 

Dorothy Pope Greenwood, Instructor 

Elizabeth S. Chamberlain, Part-time Instructor 

English 101-102 prerequisite for English 221-222: English 221-222 pre- 
requisite for all other courses in English except 233, 358 and Speech 221, 226. 

Requirements for a major : Thirty hours in English including l^ngllsh 
101-102; English 221-222; twelve hours from English 351, 352, 353, .354, 355, 
494, 498 ; and six additional hours from English courses numbered abo.te 300. 
No credit in the Department of English given for Education 385 E. History 
340 (English history) recommended to English majors. 

101-102, lOlS. PRINCIPLES OF WRITING Credit. Six Hoursl 

Staff 

221-222, 221S. DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Credit, Six Hours 
Miss Johnson, Miss Rose, Miss Knight, Miss Hafner, Mrs. Greenwood 

233. CREATIVE WRITING Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Greenwood 

351. OLD ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss ,Tohnson 



* During the (all semester one section will meet five times a week with three hours 
credit, to take care of the needs of students deficient In fundamentals. 



CODE8K8 OF INSTRUCTION S6 

352. CHAUCER Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: English 351. Miss Johnson 

353, 354. SHAKESPEARE Credit, Three or Six Honra 

Miss Rose 

366. MILTON Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Johnson 

367. AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 

CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Hafner 

358. ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Knight 

362. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Johnson 

364. POETRY OP THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Greenwood 

365. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Knight 

368. ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 

CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Rose 

[370. PROSE OP THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

Mrs. Greenwood 

Ed. 385 E. THE TEACHING OP ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

(See page 63) Miss Rosa 

[BIX)CK COUUSE] 

494. THE TREATMENT OF LITERARY PROBLEMS Credit, One Hour 
Open only to majors In English. Miss Rose 

498. SEMINAR Credit, Three Hours 

Open only to majors in English. Miss Johnson 



SPEECH 

221. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Gorsnge 

226. ORAL INTERPRETATION Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Gorsnge 

[351. RELIGIOUS DRAMA Credit, Three Hours] 

Miss Gorsnge 

862. PLAY PRODUCTION Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Oorsage 



66 MEREDITH OOLJxEGE 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Quentin Oliver McAllister, Professor 

Susanna H. Freund, Associate Professor 

^Ann Eliza Brewer, Assistant Professor 

Mary Eleanor Krummel, Assistant Professor 

Lucy Ann Neblett, Assistant Professor 

William R. Ledford, Instructor 

P. A. Cline, Jr., Instructor 

Courses numbered 101-102 and 221-222, or their equivalent, are pre- 
requisite for any course of higher number. 

Requirements for a major in French, Latin or Spanish : Twenty-four 
hours above 101-102, or eighteen hours above 221-222, including 351-352. 
Majors in French or Spanish must include 357 and 358. Latin majors are 
required to take a course in Ancient History. Foreign Language majors are 
urged to include a second foreign language as a related field. 

In order to comply with new certification requirements, students who 
plan to teach French or Spanish must take the courses numbered 357 and 
358 in the language to be taught. Ed. 3S6 ML is required of students plan- 
ning to teach a foreign language, and counts as Education. 

FRENCH 

101-102. ELEMENTARY FRENCH Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the French language through analysis, contact, and use. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Credit, Six Hours 

Review of French grammar ; introduction of more difficult aspects of the 

language ; readings of appropriate difficulty ; practice In the oral and aural 

skills. Staff 

351-352. FRENCH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 
A survey of the development of French literature and the main currents 
of French thought from the beginnings to the contemporary period. 

Mr. McAllister 

353. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 
A literary study of the representatives of French classicism in religious 

thought, philosophy, and drama, with some reference to their importance 
In the development of continental European civilization. Mrs. Freund 

354. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 
The period of the decline of absolutism, tie rise of the bourgeoisie, and 

the development of the rational spirit as shown in the literature of eighteenth- 
century France. Mrs. Freund 

[355. FRENCH ROMANTICISM Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAllister 

[356. FRENCH REALISM AND NATURALISM Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAllister 



' Part-time. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 57 

357. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION Credit. Three Hours 

Required of majors in French. Sophomores admitted by permission only. 

Mr. McAllister 

358. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 
Required of majors in French. Sophomores admitted by permission only. 

Mr. McAllister 

[361. MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE 1880-1919 Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAllister 

[362. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE, 

1919 TO THE PRESENT Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAllister 

493. DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURE OF THE 

FRENCH LANGUAGE Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the historical development of French from Latin. Reading of 
works in Old French. Some introduction, through French, to the general 
field of linguistics. 

Offered only when the demand is sufficient. Mr. McAllister 



GERMAN 

101-102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the German language through analysis, contact, and use. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Mrs. Preund 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Credit, Six Hours 

Review of German grammar ; introduction of more difficult aspects of the 

language ; readings of appropriate difficulty ; practice In the oral and aural 

skills. 

German 35S may be substituted for German 222. Mrs. Freund 

861-352. GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Credit, Six Hours 
A study of the development of German Literature from the beginnings 

to the contemporary period. Extensive and Intensive rending of significant 

works. Ijectuies and reports In German. 

Offered only when the demand Is sufficient. Mrs. Freund 

853, 354. FAUST; LYRIC POETRY OF THE 

19Tn CENTUltY Credit, One Hour Each Semester 

Mrs. Freund 

868. SCIENTIFIC GERM.VN Credit. Three Hours 

Designed to meet the needs of students who are Interested especially In 

Bclentlflc work. Offered only upon demand. Mrs. Freund 



58 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

LATIN 

101-102. ELEMENTARY LATIN Credit, Six Hours 

A course for beginners entailing the fundamentals of the language. Open 

to students who offer less than two units for entrance. Mr. Cline 

221-222. VERGIL'S AENEII> Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite : Two units of Latin for entrance or Latin 101-102. 

An intermediate course in Latin designed to prepare the student for work: 

with the more difficult authors. Primary considerations will be translation 

of the Aeneid and applied grammar and syntax. Mr. CUne 

351-352. ROMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit. Six Hours 
Prerequisite : Four units of Latin and a satisfactory score at 
entrance, or Latin 221-222. 

A survey of Latin literature and civilization with emphasis on represen- 
tative writers. Translation of the prose of Livy, Pliny, the poetry of Horace. 

Mr. CUne 

363-364. ROMAN COMEDY AND SATIRE Credit, Six Hours 
Prerequisite : Latin 351-352. 

Translation of the plays of Plautus and Terence and the satires of 

Juvenal and Horace. Mr. Cline 

[365-366. ROMAN HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL WORKS 

Credit, Six Hours] 
Prerequisite: Latin 351-352. 
Translation of selections from Tacitus, Cicero, Suetonius. 

Mr. Cline 

SPANISH 

101-102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the Spanish language through analysis, contact, and use. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Credit, Six Hours 

Review of Spanish grammar; introduction of more difficult asjiects of 

the language ; readings of appropriate difficulty ; practice in the oral and aural 

skills. i!tafC 

351-352. SPANISH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 
A study of the moi-e important works of Spanish literature, particularly 

as they reflect Spanish life and culture. 

Alternates with Spanish 353-354. Miss Neblett 

[353-354. SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours] 

A .study of representative works of Spanish-American literature, particu- 
larly as they reflect the history and civilization of the nations concerned. 

Alternates with Spanish 351-352. Mr. Ledford 

357. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors in Spanish. Sophomores admitted by permission only. 

Miss Neblett 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

358. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Honre 

Required of majors in Spanish. Sophomores admitted by permis- 
sion only. Miss Neblett 

(492. MODERN SPANISH DRAMA Credit, Three Hours] 

Open to seniors, and to others by special permission. 
Alternates with Spanish 494. Miss Neblett 

494. MODERN SPANISH NOVEL Credit, Three Hours 

The modem Spanish novel, beginning with Feman Caballero. Open to 
seniors, and to others by special permission. 

Alternates with Spanish 492. Miss Neblett 

Ed. 386 M.L. THE TEACHING OP FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(See page 53.) Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Jay D. Massey, Assistant Professor 

Helena W. Allen, Instructor 

Mary Mackay Edwards, Assistant in Equitation 

Virginia J. Ilood, Instructor 

Frances W. Stevens, Part-time Instructor 

The program of the Department of Health and Physical Education is 
designed to meet the needs of each individual student with respect to such 
problems as : 

1. The development and maintenance of a high degree of physical 
efficiency throuRh a varied program of sports, rhythmic activities, and 
restricted phyHinil education. 

2. The development of fundament.-il skills In those activities which will 
contribute to an intelligent use of leisure time. 

3. The provision of adequate opportunities for the development of quall- 
des of leadership and cooiM'ration through participation in the Intramural 
Program. 

4. The development of Intelligent underatnnding of and a positive atti- 
tude toward per.'sonnl henlth and hygiene in relation to dally living. 

All students enrolled in health and physical education are required to 
undergo i)hysical examinations. Upon the basis of these examinations the 
College physician classifies each student for a physical education clnsa 
In vigorous activity, semi-vigorous activity, or restricted physical education. 
During orientaticm week all freshmen are introduced to the facilities of 
the student health service by the College physician. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

101, 102. TERSONAL HYGIENE Credit, One Hour 

either semester 
Two bonrs a week for one semester. Required of freshmen. 

A fundamental course in the principles and problems of iiersoniil hygiene. 
The course Includes discussions based uiKm student health problems and 
Interests, and instruction based upon health problems of college students. 



60 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Ed. 382 H. Ed. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF HEALTH 
EDUCATION FOR THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL Credit, Three Hoore 

See page 52. 

Ed. 385 H. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF HEALTH 
EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM 
TEACHER Credit, Two Hoars 

Designed to furnish prospective elementary teacbers with information 
and ideas to be of help in planning, carrying out and evaluating classroom 
health instruction. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

students enrolled in activity course.s in physical education are required 
to have re?ralation gymnasium costumes for class. All freshmen and transfer 
students must purchase their uniforms during the first week of school from 
the Meredith Supply Store. 

First semester freshmen are limited to dance, team sports or equitation. 
Each semester thereafter students may choose from the variety of activities 
offered. 

Ill, 112. TEAM SPORTS : Beginning and Advanced Courses. 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Basketball 

Hockey 

Softball 

Speedbnll 

VolleybaU 

221, 222. RHYTHMIC ACTIVITIES : Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced 
Courses. ', 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Modern Dance 

Folk and Square Dance 

223, 224. RESTRICTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Students classified for restricted physical education upon the recom- 
mendation of the College physician are enrolled in these courses. Each 
course is adapted to the needs of the Individual student. In cases where 
student choices can be allowed, final selection will follow a conference 
with the head of the department. These activities are also open to students 
who are not on a restricted program. 

Archery Recreational Sports Slimnastics 



COUBSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

251, 252. INDIVIDUAL SPORTS: Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced 
Courses. 
Two hours a week for each semester. 

Archery Life Saviuf;2 

Badminton Water Safety Instructor's Course 

Bowlings Roller Skating 

Equitationi Swedish Gymnastics 

Golfi Tennis 

382. COMMUNITY RECREATION AND CAMP LEADERSHIP 

Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the concept and theory of recreation and camping ; present-day 
trends in the light of their historical backgrounds ; the organization of 
recreation centers, public and private camps ; principles and methods of 
planning, conducting, and evaluating these two programs. 

383, 384. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION FOR THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Six Hours 

A survey of the history and principles of physical education as related 
to a good program of physical education for the secondary school. A study 
of the activities as they relate to the needs of this age grouj). with experience 
In lesson planning and assisting with college classes. 

Ed. 386 P. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS OP PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM TIOACHER 

Credit, Two Hours 

Designed to help prospective clomeutary teachers to see and understand 

the place of physical education in the total educational system. Opportunities 

given for les.son planning and teaching the different types of activities for the 

various grade levels in elementary school. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Sarah McCulloh Lemmon, Professor 

Richard D. Goff, Instructor 

Thomas C. Parramore, Instructor 

Vernon O. Stumpf, Instructor 

Henri R. Pearcy, Fart-time Associate Professor 

Requirements for a major : twenty-four semester hours In history 
including 101-102 and 251, 2'>2. 

History 400 is given in tin- fall of odd-numbered years. 

Ed. 386 S. St. counts as Education. 



' Special Fee. Paid at the time of reglstrutlon for the class. 
' Special Fee. Paid by Individuals at oft-campus fai-lllty. 



ez MEREDITH COLLEGE 

HISTORY 

101-102. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF MODERN 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

First semester : from preliistory to the French Revolution ; second se- 
mester, from the French Revolution to the present. Introducing cultural and 
economic topics as well as historical. Staff 

Prerequisite to all other courses in history. 

251. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865 Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Goff, Miss Lemmon 

252. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865 

Credit, Three Hours 
Mr. Goff, Miss Lemmon 

270. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH Credit, Three Hours 

From colonial times to the present. Mr. Goff 

301. ANCIENT HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From prehistoric times to the fall of Rome. 

302. MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the fall of Rome to the opening of the 16th century. 

340. HISTORY OF ENGLAND SINCE 1560 Credit, Three Hours 

Social, economic, and political studies. Mr. Parramore 

341. EARLY MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit. Three Hours 

From the Commercial Revolution of the Congress of Vienna. 

Mr. Parramore 

342. MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of VS'^orld War I. 

Mr. Parramore 

343. RECENT EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the outbreak of World War I to the present. 

Mr. Parramore 

348. FAR EASTERN POLITICS AND CULTURE Credit, Two Hours 

China and Japan in modern times. Mr. Stumpf 

351. HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN COLONIES Credit, Three Hours 

To the Constitutional Convention. 
Prerequisite: History 251. Mr. Stumpf 

360. ECOMONIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 251, 252. Mr. Goff 

Bd. 386 S. St. THE TEACHING OF HISTORY AND 

SOCIAL STUDIES Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Lemmon 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

400. SUPERVISED TRAINING IN ARCHIVES Credit, Three Honrs 

Open to juniors and seniors taking a major in history. Professional 
trainiflg in Archival Science, Museum Art, or Publications under 
the joint supervision of the North Carolina Department of Archives 
and History and the Meredith College Department of History. 
Practicum required. 

444. CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Credit, One Hour 
Prerequisite : History 343 or 12 hours in history. Mr. Pearcy 

451. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF 

THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1860 Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 251, 252. Miss Lemmon 

452. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES BEFORE 1860 Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 251, 252. Miss Lemmon 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

201. GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Stumpf 

202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN 

THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Stumpf 

301. POLITICAL PARTIES IN THE UNITED STATES 

Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite: Political Science 201 and History 252. Mr. Goff 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Elleu Dozier Brewer, Professor 

.Jennie M. Hanyen, Associate Professor 

Requirements for a major : Twenty-four semester hours of work in home 
economics above the freshman level. Students are advised to take Cliemistry 
101-102 In the freshman year. 

Ed. 38(! H. E. counts ns Education. 

101. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 

A study of clothing selection and appreciation. Elementary clothing 

conHtniction. An analysis of fabrics to find the relation between cost and 

quality. Miss Hanyen 

IW. FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

Two lecturf.s niid four hours of laboratory. 
Food selection and preparation. Miss Brewer 

223. FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

One lecture and live hours of laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 10-1, except by permission of the 
head of tlio department. 
A study of the principles and processes In the preparation and preserva- 
tion of food, and a consideration of the time and money values Involved. 

Miss Brewer 



64 MEREDITH COLLEGE 



224. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 101. One lecture and five bours 
of laboratory. 
Advanced clothing construction. Continuation of fabric analysis. 

Miss Ilanyen 

351. NUTRITION Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 223, and Chemistry 101-102. Two 
lectures and two hours of laboratory. Miss Brewer 

352. ADVANCED FOODS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 223. Two lectures and four hours of 

laboratory. 

A course designed to apply the principles of nutrition and cookery to 

the planning, preparation, and service of meals of various types and costs, 

with special emphasis on consumer buying practices and their relation to 

the food budget. Miss Brewer 

353. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 224. One lecture and five hours of 
laboratory. 
Tailoring. Use of foundation pattern In designing. Identification and 
practical testing of materials. Miss Hanyen 

[354. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit. Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 353. One lecture and five hours of 
laboratory. 
Alternates with 358. 
Applied costume designing. Problems draped on the dress form. 

Miss Hanyen 

356. CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HOME NURSING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the physical care and the development of the child from the 

pre-natal period through infancy. Principles of nursing as applied to the 

home care of the sick. Miss Hanyen 

358. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Elective for juniors and seniors not majoring in home economics. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 
A survey of personal clothing problems to include the basic princip}es of 
selection, ron.struction. ami leudvation of garmiiils; the use of commercial 
patterns, and ii knowledge (if textiles from the standpoint of the consumer. 

Alternates with 354. Miss Hanyen 

359, 359S. FOOD SELECTION AND PREPARATION Credit, Three Hours 

Elective for juniors and seniors in all courses. Two lectures and 
four hours of laboratory. 
A brief cnurse in fooil st'lccfion, preparation and service, plannefi for 
students uiajoriug in other tielils. Miss lirewer 

[362. DIET THERAPY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 351 and Chemistry 221. Two lectures 
and two hours of laboratory. 
A continuation of Home Economics 351 with emphasis on special dietary 

problems. Miss Brewer 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

[364. HOUSE PLANNING AND FURNISHING Credit, Three Hours] 

A study of the house plan from the standpoint of convenience and artistic 
effect. The selection of household furnishings and arrangements of interiors 
with special emphasis on economic factors. 
Alternates with Art 362. 

Ed. 386 H. Ec. METHODS OF TEACHING HOME 

ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

See page 53. Miss Hanyen 

389. HOME MANAGEMENT Credit, Three Hours 

The application of sci<'ntific principles to the problems of the modern 
homemaker ; an evaluation of home e<iuipnient, its choice, care, and use. 

Miss Brewer 

491. ECONOMICS OF THE HOME Credit, One Hour 

Open to seniors taking a major in home economics and to juniors by 

permission. Prerequisite or parallel : Home Economies 389. Miss Ilanyeu 

493 or 493S. ECONOMICS OP THE HOME— RESIDENCE 

Credit, Two Hours 

To be taken in tonnpction with Home Economics 491. 
Resid^-nce for students in groups in the home management house. 

Miss Hanyen 

MATHEMATICS 

Ernest i\ Cauaday, Professor 

Dorothy K. Preston, Instructor 

Geneva L. Martin, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major; Twenty-one semester hours above 101 and 
102. Ed. 385 M. counts as education. 

101. COLLEGE ALGEBRA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : two units in algebra. 

102. TRIGONOMETUY Credit, Thret- Hours 

Prerequisite : two units in algebra and one in plane wometry. 

221. PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY Credit, rtiree Hours 

Prerequisite: 101 and 102. A few fii'shinen having throe units in 
algebra .md a coiirse in trigonometry and scoring over .")»)() on the 
College Board Mathematics test and making a good score on a 
test given iit Meivdith at the beginning of the year may be ad- 
mitted. 

222. ANALYTIC (iEOMETUY OF SPACE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 221. 

232, IUFKEIillNTIAL CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

I'rerequislte: 221. 

351. INTE(;nAr> calculus Credit, Three Hours 

PrcicMuisite : 232. 



66 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

352. ADVANCED CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 351. 

353. THEORY OF EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 221. 

356. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 232 and parallel with course 351. 

[457. MODERN COLLEGE GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : 101 and 102. 

Ed. 385 M. METHODS OP TEACHING SECONDARY 

MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours 



MUSIC 

Harry E. Cooper, Professor 

Stuart Pratt, Professor 

Beatrice Donley, Associate Professor 

Jean Swanson, Assistant Professor 

Edwin K. Elauchard, Assistant Professor 

Phyllis Weyer Garriss, Assistant Professor 

James L. Clyburn, Instructor 

Isabella Haeseler, Instructor 

The courses in the Department of Music fall into several principal groups, 
namely : courses in history and appreciation designed primarily as cultural 
courses for students not specializing in music ; courses in teaching methods 
designed to prepare for work as a teacher of music (in the public schools 
or as a private teacher) ; courses in theoi-y and composition designed to 
furnish a solid background for the understanding and intepretation pt the 
greatest music as well as to develop to the fullest the creative ability of 
the in<iividual ; courses in singing and playing leading to artistic performance; 
and courses leading to a major in church music. 

Students who wish to major In any branch of music must demonstrate 
to the satisfaction of the head of the department that their talent and 
previous training are such that they are qualified to carry on the work In a 
satisfactory manner. 

Students who cannot meet all the entrance requirements of the college 
and the department may take work in applied music, but will not receive 
credit for such work. 

For Music majors applied music must be validated by equal credit (with 
O or better) In courses selected from the following: Theory, History and 
Literature, Music Education and Ensemble, subject to quantitative restrictions 
stated elsewhere In the catalogue. 

Music majors must complete at least sixty semester hours In non-music 
subjects. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION (17 

Major in Applied Music (piano, organ, violin, or voice) for the degree ol 
Bachelor of Arts: 

Applied music major 24 hours 

Electives in applied music and ensemble 6 hours 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Electives in Theory, History and Literature, Music 

Education, and Ensemble 6 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Major in Music Education for the degree of Bachelor of Arts : 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Methods 3S5, 3861 6 hours 

Wind Instruments 365, 366 2 hours 

String Instruments 367, 368 2 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Piano and voice2 

Major in Church Music for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Church Music 387, 388 6 hours 

Field work in Church Music 493 3 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Applied Miisic 24 hours 

Minimum of (i hours each In piano, organ, and voice 
(12 hours in one of these) 

World-Wide Christianity, Rel. 347 3 hours 

The Local Church Program, Rel. 356 3 hours 

Majors in chnrch music, organ, public school music, violin, and voic« 
must complete Piano 101 with a satisfactory grade. 

Major.s in pulilic srhool music and churcli music are expected to appear 
In one pul)lic recital above the level of the student recital. 

Majors in organ should elect : Counterpoint, four semester hours (junior 
year) ; and Canon and Fukuc, two semester hours (senior year). 

A senior recital and a partial junior recital Is required of all majors In 
applied music. 



> Six hours toward the certificate requirements (see p. 60). 

'Piano and voice muNt be studied until, In the opinion of the faculty, a reoaonabU 
proflclcncy has been reached. 



68 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 

MUSIC 

students who bold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
will be granted the degree of Bachelor of Music on meeting the following 
requirements : 

1. Present a total of 45 hours in applied music, at least 36 hours of 
which must be in one major field of applied music, and give a recital which. 
In the opinion of the faculty, is worthy of the degree. 

2. Complete all theory courses in the following list which have not 
already been completed : 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

Music history 36.3, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Counterpoint 351, 352 4 hours 

Canon and 'Fugue 498 2 hours 

Composition 491 3 hours 

Development of Symphony 401 2 hours 

Orchestration 494 2 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Survey of Chamber Music 402 2 hours 

Students may elect additional courses in any department if time permits, 
but will not be required to carry more hours than necessary to meet these 
minimum requirements. 

EQUIPMENT 

Six grand pianos, twenty -one upright pianos, a three-manual organ, two 
two-manual organs and numerous orchestral instruments furnish thorough 
equipment for effective teaching. 

STUDENT RECITALS 

student recitals are held bi-weekly, at which all music stmlents are 
required to be present, and in which they are required to take part when 
requested to do so by their teachers. 

Freshmen and sophomores majoring in piano, organ, voice, or violin will 
appear in recital at least once each semester, except that freshmen may 
be excused the first semester. Juniors will be heard at least twice each 
semester, and seniors at the discretion of their major professors. 



CONCERTS 

The College appropriates funds to provide opportunities for the students 
to hear good music. The Raleigh Concert Music Association brings a number 
of orchestras and artists to Raleigh each season. Concerts given by the 
Raleigh Oratorio Society, the Chamber Music Guild and other local organiza- 
tions are also open to students. Members of the faculty of the Department 
of Music are active as recitalists, and the faculty concerts given throughout 
the year include works from all schools of composition. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

THEORY 

101, 102. THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Theory 101 before 102. Each Semester 

Required of freshmen majoring in music 

Elementary harmony with special emphasis on primary and secondary 
triads and Dominant Seventh chords. Correlative studies in sightslnging, 
dictation, keyboard harmony, and harmonic analysis. 

Miss Swanson 

221, 222. THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Theory 102 before 221 and Each Semester 

221 before 222. 

Required of sophomores majoring in music. 
A continuation of Theory 101, 102. Review of harmonic practice followed 
by a study of modulations, seventh chords, chromatic alterations as exemplified 
in the works of the major Baroque, classic and romantic composers. 

Miss Swanson 

233. MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS' Credit, Three Hours 

This course is intended for the student majoring in Primary Education. 
The student will study pitch, scales, keys, and key signatures, rhythm and 
time signatures, rhythmic reading and elementary chords and their functions. 
There will be included melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation, and basic 
keyboard harmony. Xot open to students who have completed Theory 101. 102. 
[BLOCK COURSE] Mr. Blanchard 

351, 352. COUNTERPOINT Credit. Two Hours 

I'rerequisite : Theory 222 before ."551 and Each Semester 

351 before .'552. 

Required of juniors majoring in organ. 
Strict counterpoint in all live species and a study of the medieval modes. 

Mrs. Garriss 

353, 354. FOltM AND ANALYSIS Credit, Two ll.mrs 

Pnriquisite: Tlieory 222 before .35.'{ and Each Semester 

3.'5.3 before :j.>l. 

Required of juniors majoring in music. 
An explanation of design and structure in all types of homopbonic 
music. The phrase, period, song-forms carried through to the sonata. 

Mr. Cooper 

491. COMPOSITION Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisites: Counterpoint .3.72, Form and Analysis 3.54. 
Composition in various f(]rras for voice, chorus, individual instruments, 
and combinations of instruments, followed largely by the inclination of the 
student. 

Mrs. Garriss 

494. ORCHESTRATION Credit. Two Hours 

Prerequisites : Theory 222. Counterpoint .352. 
A study of the Instruments of I lie orchestra. Arranging music for various 
groups of iustrurncntH anil fur full (irclieslnis, 

Mrs, Garriss 



70 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

498. CANON AND FUGUE Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite : Counterpoint 352. 
Required of seniors majoring in organ. 

A course touching upon all the complex devices of involved polyphonic 
mnsic. Double, triple, and quadruple counterpoint. 

Mr. Cooper 



HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

226. APPRECIATION OF MUSIC Credit. Three Hoars 

A course adapted to the needs of the general college student who wishes 
to obtain an understanding of music as an element of liberal culture and to 
develop the power of listening tntelligently. No technical knowledge required. 
Not open to music majors. 

Mrs. Garriss 
Mr. Blanchard 

363, 364. THE HISTORY OF MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisites : EngUsh 102, History 102, and Each Semester 
Music Theory 102. 

Required of students majoring in music. 
The development of musical art from ancient times to the present. 
The study of music as literature, through the analysis of masterworks. 
[BLOCK COURSE] Mrs. Garriss 

387, 388. CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 101, 102 ^^^ich Semester 

A course dealing with all phases of music in the Protestant church. 
Organization and administration of adult and children's choirs, with ex- 
tensive survey of anthems and other materials. Study of hymns and their 
use, and consideration of the ministry of music as an aid to worship. 

Mr. Cooper and Staff 

401. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYMPHONY Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Music History 364 or Music Appreciation 226. 

The history of the symphony, with a detailed study of several works 
and sufficient hearing of about a dozen outstanding works so that the student 
becomes familiar with them. The styles of different composers and the 
development of orchestration emphasized. The writing of a research paper 
of small thesis proportions based primarily on the study of scores and 
recordings used in the course. 

Mrs. Garriss 

402. SURVEY OF CHAMBER MTTSIC LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite : Music History 364 or Music Appreciation 226. 

The history of chamber music emphasizing the forms and stj-les of 
various periods and composers. Student-faculty performances of chamber 
works whenever possible. Score-study and recordings of about fifteen out- 
standing chamber works so that the student becomes very familiar with them. 

Mrs. Garriss 



OOUESES OF INSTRUCTION 71 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

234. GRADED MATERIALS' AND METHODS Credit, Three Honra 

Prerequisite : Music Fundamentals 233 or 
permission of the department 

This course is recommended for aU prospective teachers at the elementary 
level, especially those preparing to teach in North Carolina. Designed to 
lead the primary education teacher toward an understanding of the presenta- 
tion of singing, rhythmic, instrumental, listening, and creative activities to 
the child in grades one through six, the course is presented through a 
sequence of related activities. Not open to students who have completed Ed. 
3S5 Mus. 

[BLOCK COURSE] Miss Haeseler 

867. THE TEACHING OF THE PIANO Credit, Three Hours 

Methods of teaching children notation, piano technique, elements of 
theory, rhythm, and ear training, with a systematic study of material suitable 
for beginners of all ages, as well as more advanced students. A survey of 
piano literature. 

Mr. Clybum 

861. THE TEACHING OF STRING INSTRUMENTS Credit, Three Hours 

A short resume of the history of string instruments, their construction 
and literature. Methods of teaching children notation, elements of theory, 
ear-training, left-band technique, bowing technique ; good tone production ; 
systematic study of material for pupils of all grades of advancement. 

Mrs. Garriss 

866, 366. WIND AND PERCUSSION INSTRUMI5NTS Credit, One Hour 
Required of majors in public school music. Each Semester 

A practical study of the technique of two brass instruments, one wood- 
wind, and one percussion instrument. 

Mrs. Garriss 

367, 368. STRING INSTRUMENTS Credit. One Hour 

Required of majors in public school mu.sic. Each Semester 

A practical study of string instrumeiits with emphasis on violin. 

Mrs. Garriss 

Ed. 386 Mus. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 

TEACHING MUSIC IN THE GRADES Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 102. Required of juniors 
majoring In public school music. 

A study of the various text.s In use In the elementary grades, the use 
of songs and dances, rhythmic studies for children. Planning the work In 
the cliissrriiini and for the yoar; methods of Interesting children In music. 
Selection and presentation of rote song; the child voice In singing; the 
nmnuslcnl ehllii; Introduction of stuff notation and the beginning of music 
reading; directed listening. 

Miss Haeseler 



72 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Ed. 386 Mus. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 

TEACHING MUSIC IN THE HIGH SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite : Theory 102. Ri>qulreU of juniors 
majoring in public school music. 
A study of the texts in use in the junior and senior high school. The 
adolescent voice and its care ; testing and classification of voices. The organi- 
zation and conduct of a high school department of music. Songs and texts 
suitable for high school use. 

Miss Haeseler 

493. FIELD WORK IN CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

495a. OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING 

IN APPLIED MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

The work to be done in connection with Theory 357 or 361, under the 

direction of the professor giving such course. In some cases a limited amount 

of this credit allowed toward the requirement in directed teaching for the 

certificate. 

Prerequisites : Education and Music 357. Mr. Clybum 

495, 495S. OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING Credit, Three or 
IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS Six Hours Either 

Semester 
See Education, page 54. 
Prerequisites: Education 231, 352; Ed. .385. 3Sfl Music. 

Miss Haeseler 

497. CONDUCTING Credit, Two Hours 

Required of students majoring in public school 
music and church music. 
Class meets three times weekly. 
Essentials in conducting, baton technique. Practical experience in 
conducting in the college chorus. 

Mr. Blanchard 

ENSEMBLE 

369, 370. ENSEMBLE PLAYING Credit, Two Hours 

Each Semester 
A study of the standard ensemble literature; open to all qualified stiJdenta 
by arrangement with members of the faculty. ' Staff 

CHORUS Credit, One Hour 

Each Semester 

Two semesters required for all students majoring in music. Non-majors 
admitted on basis of auditions held at beginning of each semester. The 
Chorus as a whole, and groups selected from it, provide music for various 
college functions and give concerts on and off the campus. Attendance at 
three one-hour rehearsals each week and at all performances required. 

Miss Donley 

ORCHESTRA Credit, One-half Hour 

Each Semester 
An opportunity given to students to play in an orchestra, to hear their 
own arrangements performed, and to gain experience in conducting. 

Mrs. Garriss 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Students in the music department who wish to take part In public 
programs should consult with their respective teachers and the head of the 
Department of Music in advance. 

All courses in applied music require three hours practice per week for 
each semester hour credit ; for every three semester hours credit, or fraction 
thereof, a student must take not less than one lesson a week, of at least a 
half-hour duration, throughout the semester. No student is permitted to 
take mure than eight semester hours of applied music in any one semester. 
The work in applied music is adjusted to suit the needs of each individual 
student, but in general follows the outline of the following courses : 

PIANO 

Mr. Pratt, Mr. Clyburn, Miss Swanson, Miss Haeseler 

The materials used for technical development are variable, depending on 
the concepts of thi' teacher, .nnd the individual needs of the pupil. A thorough 
knowledtte of all scales and arpeggios should be established before a pupil 
enters Piano 101. 

101, 102. FRESHMAN PIANO 

Bach Invoitions, Preludes, Suites; Sonatas of the difficulty of the Haydn 
In D major, Mozart F major (K. 332). and Beethoven Op. 14, No. 2; the 
easier Chopin Preludes, Valses, Mazurkas, Nocturnes; other classical, ro- 
mantic, and contemporary composers. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE PIANO 

Bach Thiie-Purt Inventions, Well-Tempered Clavier, Suites, Partitat; 
Mozart and Beethoven Sonatas; Chopin works of moderate difficulty; other 
classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

351, 352. JUNIOR PIANO 

Bach Well-Tempered Clavier, Toeeatas. Partitas, etc. : Mozart and I'.eetho- 
ven Sonatas; Chopin Etudes, Impromptus, Scherzi; Ballades; etc.; other 
classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

491, 492. SENIOR PIANO 

Bach W'll-Tempered Clavier, ('horiile-l'reludrs, and larger works: Beetho- 
ven Sonatas nt greater difficulty; Concern ; Schuiiiunn, Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, 
and Ravel works suitable for senior recital ; other classical, romantic. Im- 
pressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

ORGAN 
Mr. Cooper, Miss Swanson, Miss Haeseler 
101, 102. FRESHMAN ORGAN 

Manual and pedal technique; Bach Eight Short Preludes and Fuques; 
short pieces involvlnL: the tiiiuldmentnls of registration and use of the 
expression jiedals; hymn playing. Students beginning organ usaiiUy take 
half their work in organ and half In piano. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE OHGAN 

Bach Preludes and I'lii/ucs of the llrst master period, Choral Preludes: 
Bonatas by Guilmant, Mendelssohn; simpler works of the modern schools; 
accompanying. 



74 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

351, 352. JUNIOR ORGAN 

Bach, smaller works of the mature master period, selected movements 
from the Trio Sonatas anil Conrertos; sonatas by Guilmant, Mendelssohn, 
Rhelnberger, and others; pieces by classic and modern composers; service 
playing. 

491, 492. SENIOR ORGAN 

Bach, larger works of the mature master period ; compositions of Franck ; 
symphonies of Wider, Vierne ; compositions of the modern French, English, 
German, and American Schools. 

VIOLIN 

Mrs. Garriss 
101, 102. FRESHMAN VIOLIN 

Thorough study of bowing and left-hand technique ; Laoureux Etudes, Bk. 
II ; Mazas Op. 36 ; concertos by De Beriot and Accolay ; sonatinas by 
Schubert. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE VIOLIN 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves: Mazas Etudes Speciales, Kreutzer 
Etudes; sonatas of Corelli and Handel; concertos by Rode, Viotti, and 
Kreutzer. 

351, 352. JUNIOR VIOLIN 

Technical work continued ; etudes by Kreutzer and Fiorillo ; sonatas by 
Mozart and Beethoven ; t'oncertos by Viotti, Kreutzer, and Mozart. 

491, 492. SENIOR VIOLIN 

Scales in thirds and octaves ; etudes by Rode and Gavinies ; concertos by 
Vieuxtemps, Wieniawski, Godard, and others ; sonatas by Bach, Tartini, and 
Beethoven. 

OKCHESTRAL mSTRUMENTS 
Courses in viola, flute, and other orchestral instruments will in some 
cases be offered on request, when qualified instruction is available by mem- 
bers of the departmental faculty. Credit will be given on the same basis as 
with other applied music. 

VOICE 

Miss Donley, Mr. Blanchard 
101, 102. FRESHMAN VOICE 

Position and poise of the body, strengthening exercises for the .vocal 
mechanism, supplemented by technical exercises with musical figures for 
the development of vocal freedom. Simpler songs from classical literature. 
English and Italian pronunciation. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE VOICE 

Technical work of the freshman year continued; scales and staccato 
exercises. Moderately difficult songs by composers of romantic, and con- 
temporary literature. French and German pronunciation. 

351, 352. JUNIOR VOICE 

More advanced technique and vocalizations. Advanced literature. In- 
troduction of oratorio and operatic repertoire. 

491, 492. SENIOR VOICE 

Technical work continued, stressing flexibility. Total repertory should 
include four arias from operatic literature ; four arias from oratorio litera- 
ture; twenty songs from the classic and romantic literature; twenty songs 
from modern literature. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 76 

PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

Ethel Tilley, Professor 

Requirements for a major : Twenty-four hours in the Department with at 
least eighteen hours in Psychologj-. 

PSYCHOLOGY 
Psychology 221 is a prerequisite for all other courses in Psychology. 

221. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to the methods of science and to psychology as a science 
of human behavior : heredity, environment ; sensation, perception ; emotions, 
motives, adjustments to conflicts and frustrations: Intelligence, learning, 
remembering and forgetting, thinking; observing and reporting; Individual 
aptitudes. 

222. GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to the chief methods of laboratory psychology. Individual 
and group experiments in reflexes, animal and human learning, remembering, 
emotions, sensation, perception, imagery, illusions, fatigue, observing and 
reporting, and development of individual and fcroup attitudes. Two class 
hours and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. 

232. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT Credit, Three Hours 

(1) Personal adjustment of normal people; (2) mental health. Offered 
in alternate years. 

351. PSYCHOLOGY OF ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR Credit, Three Hours 

(1) A brief history of the treatment of the mentally ill; (2) mild mental 
disorders and slight maladjustments to social living; (3) syndromes of 
psychoses as they are classified today; (4) modern methods in diagnosis, 
treatment, and prevention of mental illness. 

[355. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours] 

(1) Communication among human beings; (2) differences and likenesses 
In social groups; (3) the individual as a member nt groups; (4) meeting 
problems of social living, such as competition for material goods, war, 
prejudice and changing customs In marriage and family life. Offered In 
alternate years. 

867. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three HonrB 

A study of the practical applications of psycliology in personal develop- 
ment and social relations ; in business, industry, and professions ; in clinics. 
Each student will add to her general study an individual investigation In a 
fleld of her interest. Offered in alternate years. 

[36.S. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY Credit, Three Hours] 

(1) The development and functioning of normal personality; (2> theories 
Of defining, assessing, and Interpn-tlng personality. Offered In alternate 
years. 



76 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

498. DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY AND 

FIELDS OF I'SYCHOLOGY Credit, One to Three Hours 

Offered on demand. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 223 or 224 is a prerequisite for all other courses in Philosophy, 
except by special permission. 

223. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours 
A student-developed course. The method differs Irom year to year. 

Lectures, discussions, student reports on materials chosen by the reporters. 

224. LOGIC Credit, Three Hours 
(1) Clearness in the use of words; (2) deductive logic; (3) inductive 

logic ; (4 ) a brief introduction to symbolic logic. Offered in alternate years. 

352. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours 

Prom Thales to Thomas Aquinas. Offered in alternate years. 

[354. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Credit. Three Hours] 

From the revolt against scholasticism to the present day. Offered in 
alternate years. 

[364. PLATO Credit, Three Hours] 

A study of the Dialogues and of Platonic influence on western philosophy. 
Offered in alternate years. 

RELIGION 

Balpli E. McLain, Professor 

Roger H. Crook, Professor 

Bernard H. Cochran, Assistant Professor 

J. Henry Coffer, Jr., Instructor 

Requirements for a major : Twent.v-four hours including 101, 102. 

101, 102. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE OLD AND NEW - 

TESTAMENTS Credit, Six Sours 

Staff 
A study of the central meaning of the Bible. 

247. WORLD-WIDE CHRISTIANITY Ctedit, Three Hours 

The world mission of the Christian religion as it confronts our 
age. Mr. McLain 

248. THE RELIGIONS' OF MANKIND Credit, Three Hours 

A survey and analysis of the great religions of the world. 

Mr. McLain 

265. THE PROPHETIC ELEMENT IN RELIGION Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the nature and function of the prophet in any age, 
with major attention given to a study of the prophetic books of 
the Old Testament. Mr. Crook 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

266. PAULINE LITERATURE Credit, Three Hours 

The development of early Christianity as found in the work and 
writings of Paul. Mr. Crook 

351. LEADERSHIP IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
The principles and techniques of Christian leadership. 

Mr. CoflEer 

[353. THE COURSE OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS' Credit, Three Hours] 
The expansion of Christianity in its world mission from the first 
century to the present. Mr. Cochran 

355. THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the great literary expression in the Bible, with an 
inten.sive study of Job, Psalms, and other Wisdom writings together 
with a study of the theology of contemporary literature. 

Mr. McLain 

356. THE LOCAL CHURCH PROGUAM Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the specific elements in developing an effective program. 

Mr. CofiEer 

361. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Credit. Three Hours 

A survey of the development of Cliristian thought and institutions 
from the first century to the modern period. Mr. Cochran 

362. BAPTIST HISTORY AND BELIKFS Credit. Time Hours 

A study of the development and distinctive contributions of the 
Baptist people. Mr. Cochran 

364. RELIGION IN AMERICA Credit, Three Hours 

An historical study from American beginnings to the contemporary 
scene. Mr. Cochran 

369. FOUNDATIO.VS OF CIIUISTI.\N THOUGHT Credit, Three Hours 

The nature and function of science, philosophy, and religion to- 
gether with ail analysis of the major problems involved in 
Christian thought, Mr. McUiin, Mr. Cochran 

370. CHRISTIAN ETHICS Credit. Three Hours 

The province, presuppositions, and ideal of the ('hristian ethic 
and its mciining for specKie prol)lems in our day. Mr. Crook 

372. PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGIOUS LIVING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the results of i)S.vchol<)gicnl analysis of religious ex- 
periences with a view to understanding belter the work of Christian 
counseling. 
Prere(iuisite : Kducnlioii .',1 nr Psychology 21. 

(3S8. TRK.NDS l.\ CONTU.MI'OH.MJV (III: l.-^Tl.W 

TIIOICJIIT Credit, Three Hours! 

Prerequisite: Ri'Iigion 2^7 iiiid cither Phllosojiliv ■_'2.'! or Religion 

3(!!). 

An analytical survey of trends in eontemponiry Christ iaii thought 

and leadershi]). .Mr. Mcl,ain 



78 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

SOCIOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Leslie W. Syron, Professor 

Preston D. Parsons, Assistant Professor 

Anna B. Peck, Part-time Instructor 

Sociology 221 is a prerequisite for all other courses in sociology. 

Requirements for a mnjor in sociology : Twenty-four lionrs in sociology 
including 221, 222, and 499, or their equivalents. 

221 or 221S. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

A general introduction to the field of sociology with emphasis upon 

culture, collective behavior, inter-group relations, community, institutions, 

and social change. Staff 

222. SOCIAL PROBLEMS Credit, Three Hours 

An analysis of some of the major problems of personal and social dis- 
organization in contemporary society with emphasis upon causes, treatment, 
and prevention. Staff 

351. AMERICAN MINORITY PEOPLES Credit, Three Hours 
A study of present day racial and cultural minorities with emphasis 

upon scientific facts about race and on changing attitudes and policies. 

Mr. Parsons 

352. CRIMINOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 
An analysis of the nature and extent of criminal behavior, factors 

which seem to be related to such behavior, and changing attitudes toward 
the criminal and crime control. Mr. Parsons 

363. THE COMMUNITY Credit, Three Hours 

A t;tu(ly of the structure and function of rural and urban communities, 
their institutions and problems. Mr. Parsons 

366. REGIONAL SOCIOLOGY OF THE SOUTH Credit, Three Hours 

A brief survey of the development of ecological, economic, and cultural 
patterns in the southeastern states : comparison with other regions. 

Miss Syron 

371. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to anthropology with special emphasis on comparative 
study of preliterate and simpler cultures. Miss Syron 

372. COMPARATIVE CULTURES Credit, Three Hours 

A study of selected areas throughout the world with special emphasis on 
the rapid modernization of undeveloped areas. Miss Syron 

374, 374F. THE FAMILY Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the origin and structure of the family and its functions as the 
basic institution of society ; an analysis of contemporary marriage and 
family experience with emphasis on necessary adjustments, resources and 
values. Mr. Parsons 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 79 

378. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL RESEARCH Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the general field of sociological research ; methods of develop- 
ing studios and analyzing sociological data. Miss Syron 

494. DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY Credit, One-Three Hours 

Research and study in a special field outside the regular departmental 
offerings. Open by permission of the head of the department to senior 
major students. Miss Syron 

497. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK Credit, Three Hours 

A pre-professional course to introduce the student to the field of social 
work ; directed activity in outside agencies. Miss Syron 

499. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the history of social thought from ancient times to the 
present, with particular emphasis on contemporary sociological thought. 

Miss Syron 

GEOGRAPHY 

221. PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY Credit, Three Hours 

An introductory world-wide survey of the distribution and characteristics 
of the elements of the natural environment, with particular reference to the 
hearing of the natural environment on the life of man. 

Miss Peck 

222. GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA Credit, Three Hours 

The regions of the United States, Canada, Alaska, and Greenland with 
regard to their physical features, resources, economic activities and social 
setting. Miss Peck 



DEGREES CONrEUUED IN 1962 

Bachelor of Arts 

Adams, Elizabeth Pate Rowland 

Adler, Johanna McKevlin Raleigh 

Allen, Betty Jane Eagles Raleigh 

Alston, Peggy Anrt Perry Guntersville, Ala. 

Averette, Betty Glenn Blackard Raleigh 

Ayscue, Mildred Jean Fuquay Springs 

Ballard, Shirley Ann Mooresville 

Barton, Frances Maria Hendersonville 

Baugham, Mary Ogie Smithfield 

Benton, Lucille Weatherspoon Laurinburg 

Blair, Martha Sarah Gretna, Va. 

Blount, Mae Letitia Elizabeth City 

Borte, Betty Hale Laurinburg 

Brannan, Elizabeth Smith Gary 

Braswell, Elizabeth Anne — Cum Laude Wadesboro 

Briggs, Jenny Lillian Leasburg 

Brock, Margaret Carole Mount Olive 

Brown, Theresa Ernestine Clyde 

Brunt, Henri Karl Fisher Raleigh 

Bryant, Patricia Ann Rich Square 

Buchanarr, Jeanne Marie Myers Winston-Salem 

Bullard, Judith Ann Baltimore, Md. 

Butler, Lucy Helen Fayetteville 

Caldwell, Celia Ann Boger City 

Camp, Seleda Ruth Gastonia 

Gartner, Anna Lee New Bern 

Chandler, Sara Ann Statesville 

Christenbury, Patricia Ann Charlotte 

Clark, Daphne Joart Fieldale, Va. 

Clark, Joyce Nelson, Va. 

Collie, Dorothy Joyce Pelham 

Cooper, Frances Gwendolyn Nashville 

Corbett, Cynthia Tabor City 

Corpening, Melinda Kay Tryon 

Courie, Ann Raynor Burlington 

Creech, Susan Helen Smithfield 

Crutchfield, Margaret Newlin Leortard Roanoke, Va. 

Dailey, Rachel Carolyn Jackson 

Davis, Brenda Gail Ayden 

DeLoatch, Peggy Lula Conway 

Dorsett, Margaret Lamb Raleigh 

Dryden, Verna Nora Princess Anne, Md. 

Eason, Mary Anne Rocky Mount 

Epps, Lora Evelena Lumberton . 

Fender, Clayta Artn , Sparta 

Garner. Joyce Cameron Mount Olive 

Gatlin, Lilmar Sue Raeford 

(80) 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1962 81 

Gillespie, Elaine LeDhu Mooresville 

Glenn, Victoria Jane Durham 

Goodwin, Judith Fayetteville 

Graham, Sallie Victoria Bakersville 

Gravett, Katherine Painter Roanoke, Va. 

Gray, Lena Elizabeth Enfield 

Gruits, Rosa Lynn Alexandria, Va. 

Hales, Lirtda Katherine : Vass 

Hall, Lula Isabel Tate Gary 

Hamrick, Ann Marie Fisher Fayetteville 

Hatley, Amy Lu Bell Raleigh 

Hawkins, Mary Carolyn Asheville 

Heck, Anna Carol Rocky Mount 

Hensley, Beverly Jean Burnsville 

Hill, Elizabeth Lee Richmond, Va. 

Hines, Reca Sanders Raleigh 

Holden, Nancy Fay Youngsville 

Holland, Tiny Sue Apex 

Holloway, Mary Ammorfs Raleigh 

Howard, Scarlett Leigh Hill Deep Run 

Huffman, Maurine Drexel 

Jackson, Mary Gladys Fayetteville 

Jackson, Patricia Ann Colerain 

Johnson, Judy LeClaire Winston-Salem 

Jones, Anita Louise Oxford 

Journigan, Diane Ford Hendersorf 

Kendall, Carol Elizabeth — Cum Laude Mars Hill 

Kirby, Linda Louise '.Winston-Salem 

Knight, Carol Jean — Cum Laude ....Ahoskie 

Lackey, Suzanne Brickhouse Raleigh 

Lay, Carolyn Miller Falls Church, Va. 

Lee, Linda Rose Benson 

Leggett, Patricia Anne Asheboro 

Leiby, Sara Louise Arlington, Va. 

Leist, Jo Ann Clayton Kenly 

Lowe, Rachel Virginia Gastonia 

McClendon, Janice Lee Wright Raleigh 

McCombs, Dorothy Foster Ral;>igh 

McDonald, Terra Gay Fayetteville 

McGranahan, Nancy Joan Durham 

McGuire, Alice Josephine Sylva 

Maner, Marilyn Katharine Wadesboro 

Martess, Hilda Jo — Cum Laude Thomasville 

Martin, Judy Elizabeth Purcelle High Point 

Martin, Poggy Joan Belmont 

Matthew?, Jessie Mae Long Severn 

Mauldin, Sarah Thackston Greenville 

Miller, Frances Ruth Walston Chapel Hill 

Moore, Janice Belford Raleigh 

Morgan, Martha Virginia Marshville 

Morrow, Sara Elizabeth Morganton 

Moseley, Shirley Dixon Ayderf 

Motsinger, Linia Elaine — Cum Laude Kemersville 



82 MEEEDITH COLLEGE 

Nash, Sylvia Angel Raleigh 

Neal, Betty Lynn High Point 

Newton, Ruby Gail Kenansville 

Nicholds, Carolyn Faye Albemarle 

Nichols, Mary Louise Jacksonville, Fla. 

Park, Carol Joyce Charlotte 

Patton, Mildred Ann Cantort 

Payne, Brenda Leah London Bridge, Va. 

Perry, Emma Lou Zebulon 

Peterson, Mary Susan Raleigh 

Phillips, Nancy Louise Roanoke Rapids 

Picklesimer, Gwendolyn Mae — Cum Laude Pisgah Forest 

Pittman, Mary Virginia Irby Cary 

Proctor, Elizabeth Rosalyn Dupree Raleigh 

Puckett, Jartet Bernard Richmond, Va. 

Reveley, Mary Floyd Raleigh 

Ricker, Nancy Eaton Norfolk, Va. 

Roberts, Florence Kathleen Raleigh 

Roberts, Ruth Elaine Dial Raleigh 

Rohlfing, Carol Lehman Raleigh 

Senter, Ida Carol Lillington 

Shadoin, Anna Kathryn Greensboro 

Shoaf, Sarah Caroline Lenoir 

Shuman, Wyrtona Patricia Henderson 

Simpson, Catherine Woodhouse Robersonville 

Smith, Judy Lavonne Kinston 

Stanley, Sandra Sue High Point 

Steen, Pattle Helms Salisbury 

Stewart, Barbara Lynne Coats 

Stowe, Dorothy Parker — Magna Cum Laude Raleigh 

Stuckey, Martha Ann — Cum Laude Raleigh 

Summey, Beverly Yvonrts Gastonia 

Taylor, Patricia Ann Kinston 

Taylor, Patricia Ann Statesville 

Thomas, Margaret Ann Lexington 

Tomlinson, Margaret Barrett Louisburg 

Vining, Julia Anne Garner 

Walker, Sarfdra Joan Morganton 

Walston, Patricia May Nashville 

Warwick, Mary Carol Lumberton 

Weeks, Kathryn Jean Raleigh 

White, Anne Hardaway Oxford 

White, Beverly Mae Youngsville 

Wilkins, Marguerite Davis Durham 

Williams, Sybil Lorena Tabor City 

Wilson, Nancy Carol Gastonia 

Wood, Carol Rose Raleigh 

Worthington, Sadie Sue Kinston 

Yancey, Julianrta Oxford 

Yates, Nancy Doris Charlotte 

Young, Jacquelyn Talley Beaufort 

Young, Judith Ann Wake Forest 



REGISTER OP STUDENTS 



Seniors 



Adams, Joy Anrte Morven 

Allen, Barbara Blanchard Raleigh 

Anders, 

Elsa Cartwright Hendersonville 

Armour, Nancy Davis Statesville 

Armstrong, 

Mary Devericks Charlotte 

Armstrong, Ruth Fisher Charlotte 

Arrington, Lynda Copley Raleigh 

Austin, Phyllis Carmen -Four Oaks 

Avery, Judith Leigh Erwin 

Bailey, Rachel Bonita Wilson 

Baker, Norma Louise Lexington 

Baker, Sarah Jean Fallston 

BarHou, 

Martha Manly Leesburg, Fla. 

Barbee, Billie Rebecca 

Parker Pollocksville 

Barbee, Clabron Ann Morrisville 

Barlowe, 

Harriet Dodd Wake Forest 

Earnhardt, Ann Drucilla Concord 

Barnhill, ' 

Geneva Undine Scotland Neck 

Baxter, Linda Carole Robbins 

Beaver, Katherine Scott -Asheville 

Benthall, Betsy Bland Woodland 

Bernard, Sarah Louise Raleigh 

Bibb, Jerrie Preston Raleigh 

Blaiock, Linda Hamrick Raleigh 

Boone, Helen Pauline Raleigh 

Bozart, Brj-na Barrett Raleigh 

Branch, Laura Wytol Enfield 

Brantley, Joarf LaRue Selma 

Brownirtg, 

Virginia Bridgers Raleigh 

Buffaloe, Edna Edmundson .Raleigh 
Bullard, Elizabeth Earle.Lumberton 

Bunn, Brenda Frances Zebulon 

Burgess, Gloria 

Jeanne Smith Elizabethtown 

Carver, 

Mary Frances Roanoke Rapids 

Chappell, Elizabeth Jean .Nashville 
Clark, 

Brenda Carole Virgilina, Va. 

Cole. Harriet Clark. .Carolina Beach 

Cooper, Sylvia Annette Aberdeen 

Dail, Nancy Elizabeth. .Mount Olive 

Daniel, Helen Finch Elm City 

Darwish, Salwa Abdel 

Aziz Falmy Alexandria, Egypt 



Davenport, 

Berma Jean Fayetteville 

Davenport, Katherine 

Gene Pactolus 

Davis, Mary Louise Sanford 

Dellinger, Donna Yancy Gastonia 

Edwards, Camille Griffiri Raleigh 

Elliott, Martha Theresa Raleigh 

Faulkner, 

lola Mae Hicks Raleigh 

Feltner, Karen Sommer Raleigh 

Fisher, Gladys Sandra Clinton 

Foster, Linda Jean Kemersville 

Funderburk, 

Judith Lee Aberdeen 

Gash, Marjorie Graham Raleigh 

Geddie, Martha Ann Carper. Raleigh 
Gorham, 

Frances Anne Rocky Mount 

Griffin, Rebecca Ann Monroe 

Hall, Marion King Harrells 

Hamrick, 

Norma Jane Kings Mountain 

Harrington, Clay Stokes Raleigh 

Harrington. Dixie Ruth Goldsboro 

Hawkins, Susan Curtis Greensboro 

Haywood, 

Elizabeth Jane.Pennsauken, N. J. 

Hege, Sonja Jean Winston-Salem 

Heffner. Barbara Jean Salisbury 

Hicks, Carroll Ann Raleigh 

Holbert, Jerry Lou Albemarle 

Holleman, Ruth Elizabeth .Durham 

Hortoif, Sandra Sue Louisburg 

Huff, Beverlye Ann Sanford 

Hughes, Mary Beth Colerain 

Hutchins. 

Patricia Carson Greensboro 

Jackson, Myra Stowe ..Knightdale 
Jeffcoat, 

Sylvia O'Daniel Wake Forest 

Johnson, Betty Jo Benson 

Johnson, Jo Anne Statesville 

Johnson, 

Mamie Lou Roberts Smithfield 

Johnson, Susan Elliott Raleigh 

Johnson, Vera Temple Hertford 

Jones, Barbara Ann Durham 

Jones. 

Janet Faye Seven Springs 

Jones. 

Nancy Katherine Pink Hill 



(88) 



84 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Kelly, Kathryn O'NeaL.Tabor City 

Kinlaw, Peggy Ann Raeford 

Klick, 

Margaret Louise. _Hendersonville 
Knight, Frances Kay Ahoskie 

Lawrence, Jane Elizabeth -Colerain 
Lawton, 

Elizabeth Ann_Georgetown, S. C. 
Leathers, Susan Louise -Henderson 

Leffler, Gretchen Ruth Charlotte 

Leonard, June CaroLWinston-Salem 

Lewis, Alice Jane Rutherfordton 

Link, Jane Elizabeth Warrenton 

McConnick, 

Mary Elizabeth Fairmont 

McFall, Julia Annette Madison 

McFarland, Lelia Downey Oxford 

McGee, Velma Ruth _Winstorf-Salem 

McGuirt, Margaret Neal Monroe 

McKelvey, 

Stella Jean Burrell Franklin 

McLamb, LaRue Benson 

McManus, Elizabeth Lee.Albemarle 

McMillan, Joyce Oliver Selnia 

McPhaul, Hazel Ellen.. Red Springs 

Milam, Mary Lasley Raleigh 

Mills, Elizabeth 

Anne Parker Richmond, Va. 

Moore, Mary Susan Rouzer.Raleigh 

Morgan, Mary Louise Oxford 

Morgan, Rhonda Kay Lexington 

Parker, Carolyrt 

Earley Miller Stuart, Va. 

Pate, Mary Belle Asheboro 

Pearce, Millicent Katherine Lenoir 

Peterson, Eula Elizabeth -_Bolton 

Philbrick, Nena Leigh Gary 

Phillips, Margaret Rand _ -Raleigh 

Pollock, Jean Ellen Trenton 

Pope, Anne Gertrude Magnolia 

Power, Brenda Joyce Raleigh 

Puckett, Mabel Ann. .Richmond, Va. 

Rains, Patricia Anne Princeton 

Ramsey, Sarah Martha Brevard 

Rand, 

Jacquline Scott Eagles. Chapel Hill 
Rankin, Edith Elizabeth ..Raleigh 

Ratehfoid, Emily Jean Gastonia 

Renfrew, 

Nancy Elizabeth Payetteville 

Rivers, Harriet Ann Wadesboro 

Robinson, Nancy Amelia Clyde 

Rogers, 

Ellen Lockhart Albemarle 

Rogers, Patricia Ann Raleigh 

Ross, Susan Lou Ayden 

Sanders, Ann Carol Four Oaks 



Satterfield, Jacqueline Creef .Raleigh 
Sawyer, Myra Kay e.. Elizabeth City 
Scearce, Brerfda Corbett ...Raleigh 

Sears, Nancy Stephens Raleigh 

Sherrill, 

Elizabeth Louise Greensboro 

Short, 

Gwendolyn Lenora.Baltimore, Md. 
Shouse, 

Judy Elizabeth Winston-Salem 

Smith, Jeanne Poole Raleigh 

Smith, Salie Alene Monroe 

Smith, Sarah Katheryn Wingate 

Sorrell, Julia Ann Wadesboro 

Spence, Martha Gray... Greensboro 
Squillario, 

Linnie Dianne Simmons. Mt. Airy 
StarliiTg, 

Faye Dean Creech Pine Level 

Stem, 

Betsy Hughes. --Darlington, S. C. 
Strickland. Joan Kaye...Smithfield 
Stuart, Fern Dahlstrom ...Raleigh 

Styron, Nell Joslin Raleigh 

Sullivan, Jane WatkiiTs ---Durham 

Swain. Judith Mizelle Raleigh 

Sykes, Eloise Edwards Raleigh 

Tench, Ann Gregson Raleigh 

Thompson, 

Miriamne Williams Sims 

Thornton, Linda Gail Four Oaks 

Tripp. Joyce Dean Suffolk, Va. 

Tyndall, Mary Louise Kinston 

Walker, Barbara Ann Snowden 

Warren, 

Sylvia Delyghte Rose -Snow Hill 
Watei-s, Marguerite Ann -Greensboro 
Weede, 

Katherine Covington. Cheraw, S. C. 
West, 

Martha Carol Christian .Durham 

Williams, Leah Rose Wilmington 

Williams, Narfcy Ellen ..Greensboro 
Williams, Patricia Jane.Kannapolis 
Willis, Martha Jane- Rutherfordton 
Wilson, Elizabeth Faucette-Durham 
Wilson, Elizabeth Strong-.. Raleigh 
Wilson, Mary Elizabeth-Thomasville 

Wolfe, Mary Ann Burgaw 

Wood, Betsy Barbour Benson 

Wood, 

Sophie Elizabeth -Clemson, S. C. 

Woodall, Elizabeth Ellen Erwin 

Worrell, Jane Raye ..Rutherfordton 

Yniguez, 

Zenaida Reyes. Manila, Philippines 

York, Betsy Rush Asheboro 

Young, Betty Anna Wake Forest 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



85 



Juniors 



Aiken, Lou Yvonne Concord 

Allen, 

Marie-Louise. -Silver Spring, Md. 
Arledge, Linda Lee-Hendersonville 

Ayscue, Madge Spence Henderson 

Baldwin, 

Mary Williams Whiteville 

Baber, Rebecca 

Ann Wilson Elizabethtown 

Bass, Betty BrownirTg Jackson 

Bell, Martha Brooks Tabor City 

Bell, Mary Alice Aulander 

Bivens, Barbara Ruth Monroe 

Blythe, Judith Carolyn Wilson 

Boone, Betsy Land Jackson 

Boutv/ell, Jean Youngblood.Raleigh 

Bowers, Barbara Diane Siler City 

Braswell, Phyllis Annette.. Zebulon 

Brickhouse, Brenda Elliott Cary 

Brock, Betty Lou Rocky Mount 

Brookshire, Barbara Ann ..Winton 

Bryan, Sara Gwynn Roseboro 

Buckner, Virginia Kay Fox.Raleigh 

Bumpass, Jane Carver Roxboro 

Butler, Sandra Jo Roseboro 

Cash, Sylvia Ann Rutherfordton 

Chewning, Beverly Jeait.Wadesboro 
Childrey, 

Anita Maier Richmond, Va. 

Copeland, 

Mary Judith Roanoke Rapids 

Cornelius, Judy Anne ..Mooresville 

Costner, Virginia Ruth Raleigh 

Coxe, Eugenia Carol Raleigh 

Craven, Martha Susanne Sanford 

Creighton, Virginia Lynne.Charlotte 

Crowder. Hildreth Jo Raleigh 

Daugherty, 

Diane Edwards Norfolk, Va. 

Dean, Phyllis Ann . Raleigh 

Dennis, Ebanor Jo Star 

DeWitt, Frances Ann Apex 

Dunn, Marie Hope Pinetops 

Dunshee, 

Margaret Elaine Parker .Raleigh 

Ellis, Carol Don Raleigh 

Ellis, Mary Ellen FromoTit 

Ennis, B.irbara Sue Dunn 

Evans, Linda Gale Hiirh Point 

Evans, Nancy Bronxvillc, N. Y. 

Farmer. Frieda Jane. Lynchburg, Va. 
Featherston, 

Mary Eugenia Fort Payne, Ala. 

FMsh, Peggy Joyce Wilson 

Fisher, Myrtle Harriett Raleigh 

Forbes, Betsy Jane Wilson 

Poxworth, Eva Mae. Winston-Salem 



Fuqua, Elizabeth Keighron. Raleigh 

Galloway, Carol Sue Charlotte 

Gillartd, Shellie Mull Raleigh 

Glenn, Frances Kathleen. .Durham 
Glover, 

Lucinda Howell Wake Forest 

Godwin, 

Elizabeth Smith Greensboro 

Godwin, Nancy Llewellyn. Charlotte 

GrifTin, Lois Elaine Williamston 

Grimshaw, 

Mary Ann Taylors, S. C. 

Hamilton, Margaret Kern ..Raleigh 
Harrilt, 

Sandra Gayle Gaffney, S. C. 

Hartley, Harriett Elizabeth. Welcome 

Hartness, Freda Barry Sanford 

Hatley, Libby Ann Raleigh 

Haywood, Martha Chason Candor 

Herring, 

Ann Farrington Winston-Salem 

Hill, Joan Myatt Raleigh 

Hinsorf, Lucy Aldridge Raleigh 

Hodges, Anne Palmer Farmville 

Hollingsworth, 

Tommy Ann Asheboro 

Holloway, Virginia Les Raleigh 

Honks, Betty Bowman FVemont 

Houghton, 

Margaret Clay Danville, Va. 

Ho'/zard, 

Frances Ann Richmond, Va. 

TTumphrpv, Rose Marie.-.New Bern 

Hunt, Patricia Nileert Raleigh 

Israel, Mary Irene McCain 

James, Sue Anne Raleigh 

Jeffords. 

Bobbie Lynne Columbu.'?, Ga. 

Johnson, Frances Lewis. Greensboro 

Johnson, Paula Sue Lillington 

Johnson. Ruth Ellen Goldsboro 

Kelly, Sandra Anderson ...Raleigh 
Kidd. 

Eli!!abeth Fitchett Haw River 

Kincheloe, 

Shirley Jane Richmond, Va. 

Lav. Patricia 

Lockhart Falls Church, Va. 

Lee, Jo Lynn Avett Raleigh 

Lloyd, Diana Dupree Raleigh 

Lloyd, Lillic Carol ...Durham 

Long. Betsy Rose Roxhoro 

McFarland. Lillian Frances. -Oxford 
McKenney, 

Mnry Lvon Virginia Beach, Va. 

McManus," Mary Juhnn.. .Matthews 



86 



MEBBDITH COLLEJOE 



McNairy, 

Frances King Greensboro 

Mackintosh, Joyce Ellen Raleigh 

Maid, Marilyn Carol Raleigh 

Mathis, Anna Lou Rutherfordton 

Matthews, 

Rebecca Grace Arlington, Va. 

Milford, Betty Louise Charlotte 

Moody, 

Sue Ellen Louisville, Ky. 

Murdock, Judith Fitzjohn —Raleigh 

Nooe, Ann Fravel Pittsboro 

Norris, Carolyn Yvonne.Greensboro 

Northcutt, Eileen Hagie Gary 

Norwood, Carolyn English_.Raleigh 

Osborne, Martha Ann Asheville 

Paschal, 

Judith Lorraine Greensboro 

Patterson, Lena Rose Smithfield 

Pearce, Judith Faye __Wake Forest 
Perry, Gloria Thompson ..Raleigh 

Phipps, Nart Ferrell Wendell 

Pittard, Pert Lile Norfolk, Va. 

Pruitt, Margaret Page ..Louisburg 

Rackley, Elsie Margaret.Smithfield 

Radford, Barbara Jane New Bern 

Raines, 

Stella Karen Kings Mountain 

Ratley, 

Katherine Allison -_Red Springs 

Reams, Jane Carol Warrenton 

Riggan, Jane Wyndham.. .Littleton 

Riggs, Shirley Jean Lillington 

Rivers, 

Elizabeth Ann Camden, S. C. 

Rivers, Martha 

Redfeam Wadesboro 

Roberson, Clarene Frances _Hillsboro 

Roberts, Karen Ann Charlotte 

Russ, 

Margaret Kay Burns .Whiteville 

Russell, Charity Ann Denton 

Saintsing, 

Barbara North. Falls Church, Va. 

Sonter, Penelope Ann Lillington 

Sessoms, Sandra Lee Apex 



Sherron, Louise Grady Raleigh 

Shervette, Lucie Geraldine .Enfield 

Simms, Helen Florence Raleigh 

Smith. Brenda Margaret. New Bern 

Smith, DoUie Louisa Fayetteville 

Sodeman, 

Betty Albeit Rocky Mount 

Spencer, Nancy Jane Raleigh 

Stainback, Joyce Ellen Hew Bern 

Stallings, 

Christine Hardy Louisburg 

Stovall, Annie Catherine Oxford 

Strickland, 

Margaret Moring Rocky Mount 

Sullivan, Gayle Price Raleigh 

Tate, Jean Arthur Burlington 

Thomas, Linda Frances Morven 

Tribble, 

Nancy Harwell Suffolk, Va. 

Tull, Bruce Brewer Rockingham 

Tutor, Peggy Laura.. IloUy Springs 
Ussery, 

Penelope Elizabeth Rockingham 

Wallace, Sandra Jean Charlotte 

Walter, Hannah Suellen Kinston 

Walters, Frances Ruth .La Grange 

Warlick, Emmalee Harris Raleigh 

Waters, Martha Babb Gary 

Watson, Rebecca Jane Greensboro 

Welt, Ruth Susan Raleigh 

White, Ann Gordon Warrenton 

White, Elizabeth Stiles. Bayside, Va. 
White, 

Emma SuzarTne Lewis _.Mt. Airy 
Whitley, June Patricia .Albemarle 

Wicker, Elizabeth Annette Kenly 

Wicker, Judith Carole McCain 

Wiggs, Adalia Jean Smithfield 

Wilbur, Brenda Fritsche Raleigh 

Wilkerson, F^ancine Gail Raleigh 

Williams, Brenda Frances _ .Raleigh 
Winfield, Mary Virginia .-Pinetown 

Woodard, Mary Hadley Wilson 

Youngblood, 

Katharyn Margaret Raleigh 

Younts, 

Mary Ann Haynes Raleigh 



Soph 

Abraham, 

Lynrt Virginia Alexandria, Va. 

Adams, Jessica L:.-nn Smithfield 

Adkins, Elva Mae Fieldale, Va. 

Ainsley, Mary Ann Ahoskie 

Allcott, 

Mary Virden Glen Allen, Va. 

Allen, Gloria Elairte Benson 

Andrews, Carol Vaughn Roseboro 



omores 

Archer, Mildred Susan Charlotte 

Armstrong, Nancy Amelia. .Belmont 
Autry, Corina Faye Bunnlevel 

Badders, Mary Sue 

Johrtson Kingstree, S. C. 

Baird, Norma Lucretia Lumberton 

Baker, Alice Faye Snow Hill 

Earbee, Sara Jean Raleigh 



BEGI8TEB OF STUDENTS 



87 



Barbour, 

Sylvia Gray Willow Springs 

Barden, Faith Murray Raleigh 

Bamhardt, 

Sarah Bette Winston-Salem 

Beard, Margaret Ann Fayetteville 

Berry, Patricia Ann Drexel 

Bolton, 

Johnnie Claire Rocky Mount 

Bostic, Emilie Jeen Asheville 

Boyd, Sherrorf Winstead Wilson 

Bradshaw, 

Carol Bea BlufFton, S. C. 

Branon, Martha Carolyn.. Charlotte 

Britt, Mary Ann Smithfleld 

Britton, Nell Cynthia Seaboard 

Brocl-, Ann Ophelia Bailey 

Brown, Alice Virginia .Wake Forest 

Brown, Glenda Lucile Wilmington 

BuflFaloe, Nancy Jean Raleigh 

Bufifaloe, Nancy Sue Raleigh 

Bullard, Elizabeth Arfn Wallace 

Bullock, Dorothy Jane Wilson 

Bullock, Sylvia Gardner Bethel 

Burgess, Charlotte Ann Shiloh 

Burroughs, 

Dorothy Ann Red Springs 

Butler, Julia Vann Elizabethtovm 

Campbell, Nancy Anne Caroleen 

Cannon, Alice Mae Greenville 

Carawan, Zona Dare Harrells 

Carraway, 

Anrfe Taylor Norfolk, Va. 

Carver, 

Sarah Louise Roanoke Rapids 

Chapman, 

Mildred Delores Wake Forest 

Chow, Verona 

Wen Lung Kowloon, Hong Kong 

Cox, Nell Jennirtgs Burlington 

Craft, Sandra Kaye.Winaton-Salem 

Craig, Nancy Helen Windsor 

Craig, 

Norma Elaine Johnson Windsor 

Craver, Connie Rebecca Welcome 

Creech, Bonnie Sue Smithfield 

Creech, 

Glenda Kay Bridgers .Smithfield 

Cullen, Donna Kaye Charlotte 

Currin, Mary Elizabeth Oxford 

Daughtrv, 

Virginia Ruth -Charlestort, S. C. 

Dean, Sandra HeleiT Selma 

Denson, 

Margaret Elizabeth. Rutherfordton 

Dilday. AUie Jane Ahoskie 

Dixon, 

Dorothy Hamilton .Galesville, Md. 
Dobbins, Mary Ruth.Winston-Salpm 



Drake, Barbara Diane Charlotte 

Drews, Betty Louise Raleigh 

Dull, 

Adrianne Donna Winston-Salem 

Dwiggins, Judith Carol Gary 

Eaton, Jane Lull Asheville 

Eddins, Phyllis Diane Rolesville 

Edwards, Alma Jane Goldsboro 

Elliott, 

Judyth Ann Kingsport, Term. 

Ellis, Betty Jo Siler City 

Ernst, 

Bettie Jane East Granby, Conn. 

Evans, 

Martha Louise Norfolk, Va. 

Faulk, 

Virginia Katherine Smithfield 

Fayed, Wadad Roanoke Rapids 

Finan, Mary Pauline Raleigh 

Fisher, Carla Bonita Asheville 

Fisher, Judith Ann Richmond, Va. 

Ford, Nancy Sue Canton 

Frye, Dorothy Susan.Athens, Tenn. 

Fulk, Tomilee Lake View, S. C. 

Garrett, 

Frances Celeste Henderson 

Garrett, 

Nancy Elizabeth Henderson 

Garvey, Betty Gower Clayton 

Gentry, 

Robin Hortense Winston-Salem 

Godwin, Hannah Patricia Selma 

Goodson, Lynn Marie Horse Shoe 

Goodwin, Rita Sue Alexandria, Va. 

Griffin, Judith Kay-Winston-Salem 

Hall, Ellen Kay Durham 

Hamilton, Karen Swansort .Raleigh 

Harris, Linda Jean Durham 

Hartness, Evelyn Crystal. Henderson 

Hartsell, Billie Anne Jonesville 

Haverstock, 

Donna Aline Roanoke Rapids 

Haywood, Kathryn Earle_-Durh.<\m 

Hendricks, Jane Bettina Nashville 

Highsmith, Peggy Jane Bethel 

Hines, Janet Louise Charlotte 

Hinson, Helen Pope Kinston 

Hoffler, Edna Louise Sunbury 

Holland, Elizabeth Jane.Lumberton 

Holliday. Carolyn Louise Raleigh 

House, Martha Andrews Monroe 

Howard, Sarah Cummings Raleigh 
Hov.ell, Carolyn Elizabeth. Weldon 
Hurst, 

Patricia HciTing Wilmington 

Hutchrrson, 

Nancy Jean Winston-Salem 

Ipock, Betty Hart New Bern 



88 



MEBEDITH COLLEGE 



Isley, Jeanne Estelle Burlington 

Isley, Sally Gayle Burlingtort 

Jones, Mary Ann Davis Raleigh 

Jones, Nancy Lou Lewiston 

Joyce, Elizabeth Gail Madison 

Keen, Judy Anne Goldsboro 

Kelly, Mar^jaret Alice Raleigh 

Kerr, Margaret 

Derfnison Hyattsville, Md. 

Kesler, Susan Ann.Kings Mountain 
Kinkead, 

Jacqueline Gail Rocky Mount 

Kirkpatrick, Betty Glyn Maxton 

Knott, Ruth Ann Henderson 

Koch, 

Barbara Jean.N. Muskegon, Mich. 

Lassiter, Phoebe Ellen Conway 

Letson, 

Linda Lou Walker __Wake Forest 

Lewis, Rebecca Anne Asheville 

Lilly, Lynda Anne Oxford 

Lipscomb, 

Beverley Lee Richmond, Va. 

McAuams, Annette Kinston 

McArthur, 

Martha McKinnon Laurinburg 

McCall, Pamela Jo Charlotte 

McCollum, Lois Elaine Madison" 

McCorkle, Ada Kay Fayetteville 

McKinnell, Beverly Anne.Charlotte 
McLoud, Jane Harriett. Elon College 
McRee, Patsy Lynn. Southern Pines 
Macomber, Priscilla Jane. Charlotte 
Marks, Eleanor Leroy.. Laurinburg 

Martin, Jerry Ann Jonesville 

Martin, Sandra Lyrfn Raleigh 

May, Eleanor Carol Charlotte 

Melton, Virginia Ann Greenville 

Miller, 

Martha Jan Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Mintz, Elizabeth Anne.Norfolk, Va. 
Moore, Mary Carolyn.. .Suffolk, Va. 
Mt. Castle, 

Kay Marie — Newport News, Va. 
Murray, 

Patricia Lee — Silver Spring, Md. 
Myers, Lynn Beth.__Winstorf-Salem 
Nance. 

Susan Elizabeth Mt. Pleasant 

Norton, Sara Jane Raleigh 

Parker, 

Eleanor Hardaway ..Suffolk, Va. 

Parker, Ruby Rebecca Goldsboro 

Parker, Sarah Frances Jackson 

Parrish, Margaret Jane... Charlotte 
Pearce, 

Johrtnie LaRue Wake Forest 



Peden, 

Elizabeth Ann. Charleston, W. Va. 
Peeples, Nancy Gwynn.Elon College 

Pegram, Patricia Hall Raleigh 

Penney, Lura Anne Kenansville 

Penninger, Doris Ann Lexington 

Petty, Brenda Carol Durham 

Phillips, Danny Morehead. .Raleigh 

Pierce, Linda Sue Charlotte 

Pittard, 

Mary Elizabeth Jacksonville 

Plyler, 

Martha Blanchard.Whaley\'ille, Va. 

Poole, Anne Pepper Kinston 

Price, Priscilla Watson Raleigh 

Pugh, Janet Greensboro 

Purgason, 

Janice Elizabeth Greerfsboro 

Raver, Mary Elizabeth Gary 

Rawlinson, 

Nancy Bridgets. .Southern Pines 
Reavis, 

Elizabeth Lomax High Point 

Register, 

Mary Katherine .- Franklin, Va. 

Renegar, Alice Elaine Harmony 

Richardson, 

Linda Mae Rooks Raleigh 

Ridoutt, Sandra Hulan New Bern 

Rogers, 

Patricia Hurst Statesville 

Savage, Katie Corinne Willard 

Searcy, Sandra Louise Forest City 

Sheltrn, Brenda Nell.-.Gretna, Va. 

Sheppard, Linda Gail Canton 

Simmons, 

Margaret Rymer Wadesboro 

Smart. Cathy Ann Cliffside 

Smith, 

Andra Katherine Norfolk, Va. 

Smith, Helen Earle New Bern 

Smith, 

Martha Elizabeth Greensboro 

Sparrov/, Willa Kaye Kinston 

SpeiTce. Betty Carolyn.Rocky Mount 
Stafford, 

Brenda Jo Ann Winston-Salem 

Stafford, 

Lessie Jean Elizabeth City 

Stallings, 

Deborah Windsor Rocky Mount 

Steele, Betty Jo Statesville 

Stevens, 

Ruth Carole Hopewell. Va. 

Stone, Martha Susan. Richmond, Va. 

Straughan, Mabel Jane Warsaw 

Strickland, 

Brenda Melha Rocky Mount 

Stricklaifd, Judith Lee Erwin 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



Swayne, 

Lucinda Gertrude Wilmington 

Tankard, 

Josephine Nicholson .Washington 

Taylor, Harriet Virginia Goldsboro 

Teachey, Sue Lyrti Rose Hill 

Thomas, Marion 

Elizabeth Georgetown, S. C. 

Tsioumas, Evangeline Kinston 

Tupper, Patricia Anne Whiteville 

Tyson, Carrie Eula Fayetteville 

Usaery, 

Catherine Elizabeth ._Kannapolis 
Vestal 

Catherine Elizabeth Siler City 



Walker, Patricia Winston-Salem 

Ward, Laura Jane Goldsboro 

Watts, Mary Virginia Goldsboro 

Welch, Marion Elizabeth Moyock 

Vv'hatley, 

Kathryn Elizabeth—Dillon, S. C. 
Whitley, Nancy Clifton_.Vandemere 
Wilfortg, Frances Pouder __Raleigh 

Williams, Roberta Gall Canton 

Womble, Patricia AiTn Lillington 

Woodard, Mary Charlotte-Nashville 
Woods, 

Judith Elizabeth-Silver Spring, Md. 

Young, Zuda Ellen Hickory 



Freshmen 

Abernathy, Carlson, Elizabeth Anne.Wilmington 

Rita Lynn Rocky Mount Carter, Betty Hastings -Raleigh 

Alford, Betsy Warren Zebulon Carter, Linda Elame —-Chadbourn 

Alligood, Judy Carol-Elizabeth City Caskey, Myra Artn -Graham 

Atwll Cathey, Meldonna Charlotte 

Alice Priscilla Richmond, Va. Cauley, Madelyn Carol Kmston 

'^Vi S-H wi c Ic 

Baber, Joan Browming -Greensboro Josephine Norristown, Penn. 

Bagby, Gay Carol Lumberton chandler, 

^^r"'^.'"' T J A wj 1 ir Sara Roselyn Southern Pines 

Andra Judyne AnnaiTdale, Va. Childress 

Banner, Elizabeth Ann —Greensboro Beverley Dale Richmond, Va. 

Barbee, Vivian demons, Mary Arfgela -Tabor City 

Annette Upper Marlboro, Md. ciinard 

Barrier, Delinda Baine Concord Lelia' Thomas — -High Point 

Barron, Harriett Hamnck -Canton ^oatcs, Ava Marie Clayton 

Be , Sarah Louise -^-^am'et Coates, Phyllis Jean Angier 

Bell, Susart Carol -Goldsboro ^oates Sarah Jo Reidsville 

Benton, Mclanie Smith --Monroe Coleman, Alice — -Pamplico, S. C. 

Bethune, Beverly Rose —Lillington Collier 

Billington Pamela Lynn -Wilmington j^^^' j^g ...Roanoke Ranids. Va. 

Booker, Mary Elizabeth -Smithfield Colucci, Linda Mav —.Wilmington 

Bragg, Sally Bailey Oxford Cooley, Jean Cowan Monroe 

Branch, Jessica Diana Gary ^^ox 

Brock, Mary Kay Rocky Mount Beverly Annette —Richmond, Va. 

Brott, Crawford 

Prudence Jayne -Hillsdale. Mich. j^^^^^. primrose -Roanoke Rapids 

BrowTf, Beverly Anne —Mount Airy creech Alice Marie —Snow Hill 

Brown, Jar.et Rebecca - -Raleigh Cress, 'Annie Laurie —Salisbury 

Bro^vn, Patricia Neal -_Reidsyille Crowe. Shervl Clark —New Bern 

Brown, Paula Jordan-Ft. Dix, N. J. Crowell, Susan Gay Concord 

o^' T /^i • xu T,- -ci Cnimpler, Helen Elaine .-Smithfield 

Suzanne LaClaire -Ft. Pierce, Fla. „ • , t Tri-i„— o„,;«o. tt^tw. 

T3^-„t Daniel, Jovce Eileen -Spring Hope 

Jeanne Werner —Rocky Mount J^«"iel, Linda Ann — -Sprinrr Hoije 

Bunch, Marian Lee -Edenton ^^^?^' -^^V'*'"^ i?^^^ — nurh^m 

Butler. Chervl Fuller -— Roseboro r^<"vis Gloria Anrt -^:R"inf,Vi 

Davis. Ruth Gay StatesviUe 

Caison, Susart Parker Roseboro Dickens, . 

Canady, Joyce Laureen ..Charlotte Florence Minerva Nashville 

Ci.rlson, Duncan. Doris 

Elaine Ruth Roanoke Rapids Phyllis Cluster Springs. Va. 



90 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Dunstan, Virginia 

Herrirfgton Elizabe*-h City 

Dute, Betty Jane Asheboro 

Eakes, Beth Devin Clinton 

Katon, Janice Ann Asheboro 

Eicher, Bonnie Jean Charlotte 

Erwin, 

Aurora Gail Roanoke Rapids 

Farabow, Nancy Ann Oxford 

Felten, 

Carol Jean Artnandale, Va. 

Ferguson, Wilda Marie Raleigh 

Flowers, Judith Carolyn ..Ahoskie 

Floyd, Mary Kate Fairmont 

Flynt, 

Sandra Caroljm Winston-Salem 

Frederick, Linda Ann Goldsboro 

Freeman, 

Jarrice Ford Charleston, S. C. 

Frye, Betsy Jeanne Stoneville 

Gaines, Daphne Lynn Golston 

Gargis, 

ITorma Eugenia Norfolk, Va. 

Gay, Mary Bridgers Seaboard 

Gillespie, 

Cynthia Gail Mooresville 

Godwin, Janie Carole Durham 

Goodman, Vicky Brown Richfield 

Green, Carol Ann Charlotte 

Greeite, Sylvia Ann Statesville 

Griffin, Bettie Ann Asheville 

Griffin, Carolyn Elizabeth _ -Monroe 

Grogan, Janet Jo Winston-Salem 

Guion, Anna Jane Marshville 

Guion, Mary Jane Charlotte 

Guthrie, Elizabeth Holmes-Asheville 
Hamrick, 

Judy Rose Wirfston-Salem 

Hanchey, Ann Gardna Rose Hill 

Hanes, Donna Jean Charlotte 

Hargrave, Caroljoi Kay Boone 

Harrington, 

Ruth Simmons Washington 

Hatcher, Linda Dir...e Gamer 

Hauser, 

Anita Wilma Winston-Salem 

Havers tock, 

Mary Elizabeth -Roanoke Rapids 
Hedrick, 

Kay Elizabeth High Point 

Herring, Mary Louise Southport 

Hicks. Peggy West Raleigh 

Hilton, Bonita Sue Lexington 

Hoglund. 

Inga Karen Marie Southport 

Holden, Dawn Gay Hudson 

Honeycutt, Peggy Grace Linderf 

Hooks, Mary Jean Fremont 

Hooks, Peggy Ann Wadesboro 



Hooper, 

Jane Tilson Elizabeth City 

Howard, 

Mary Kaye Fuquay Springs 

Hubbard, Judith Marie-Norfolk, Va. 
Hudler, Pansy Inez .-Midway Park 

Huss, Ann Wright Gary 

Ingold, Helen Johnette ..Wadesboro 

Inman, Martha Adele Wilmirtgton 

James, Grace Herring Bethel 

Johnson, 

Barbara Ann Four Oaks 

Johnson, Carole Evelyn ..Mt. Airy 

Johnson, Nancy Brenda Kinston 

Johnson, 

Virgirfia Redfem Lillington 

Johnston, Martha Graham __Weldon 
Jones, 

Hertha Maxine -.Morehead City 
Jordan, 

Pamela Elizabeth Danville, Va. 

Jorgensen, Joyce Ann Southport 

Kancar, Barbara 

Catherine New Castle, Del. 

Kanipe, Mary Ann Fair Bluff 

Katson, Kristina 

Arttonia Albuquerque, N. M. 

Keel, Beth Leah Rocky Mount 

Kelly, Sue Grey Tabor City 

Kesler, Lou Ross Henderson 

King, Martha Adelaide .-Nashville 
Kirby, 

Carolyn Sue Pampa, Texas 

Kirtley, Ann Pate Durham 

Knauff, Marguerite Lane -Charlotte 

Knight, Jo Ann Greensboro 

Kornegay, Anne Gray Washington 

Lambeth, 

Mary Katherirfe Thomasville 

Langdon, Madeljm 

Carol Johnson City, ^enn. 

Lassiter, Gail Elizabeth ■ City 

Leonard, 

Patricia Anne High Point 

LeRoy, Dontia Lou Raleigh 

Lester, Martha Elizabeth --Kinston 

Lewis, Anita Temple New Bern 

Lipscomb, 

Frances Carlton _ .Richmond, Va. 
Little, 

Rebekah Hovlene Taylors, S. C. 

Litton, Nancy Lee High Point 

Livingston, Linda Sue -.Laurinburg 

Lowry, Jean Paula Norfolk, Va. 

Lumsden, Helen Diailne -Statesville 
Lyles, 

Doris Jean Roanoke Rapids 

McClenny, Nancy Barnes Lucama 



KEGISTEB OF STUDENTS 



91 



McCormick, 

Susan Frances Fairmont 

McDuffie, 

Mary Judith Red Springs 

McEnally, 

Susan Katherine New Berrt 

McKinney, 

Liinda Louise Wadesboro 

McMakin, Martha Alice-Greensboro 

Marsh, Pearl Price High Point 

Martin, Peilny Lee Tarboro 

Mason, 

Gene Lee Alexandria, Va. 

Mayer, Nancy Lynn-Winstort-Salem 

Maynard, Judith Liles Harrells 

Medlin, Virginia Lytton Monroe 

Mentavlos, Tula Ann Gastonia 

Merkhan, 

Fadia Ebrahim Baghdad, Iraq 

Milholland, Janie Wilson-Statesville 

Miller, Judith Frances Hillsboro 

Miller, Juliaifa Concord 

Mills, Martha Vetra Taylorsville 

Mims, Susan Neileen Charlotte 

Moore, Elizabeth 

Marshall Clarksville, Va. 

Moore, Mary Fisher Washington 

Moore, 

Polly Newton Lynchburg, Va. 

Morgan, Sandra Lea Asheville 

Morris, Brenda Anne Albemarle 

Morris, Janet Kay Durham 

Morris, 

Linda Drake Sartiston, Va. 

Munford, Dheadrr. Woody --Durham 

Muse, Penelope Anrt Mebane 

Nanny, 

Charlotte Carol Winston-Salem 

Newton, Janice Fa ye Rose Hill 

Nieuwenhuis, 

Elizabeth Hilly Mount Airy 

Nixon. Sally Harwell Wilson 

Oats, Murilla Emma New Bern 

Owen, 

Rachel Marie Clarksville, Va. 

Park, Sung Sook Pusan, Korea 

Parker, 

Margaret Anne ..Wirfston-Salem 
Pearce, 

Dianne Claire Hendersonville 

Peeler, 

Jane Adele Rock Hill. S. C. 

Peterson, Patricia Ann Clinton 

Pf'thel, Billie Diana Concord 

Petree, 

Judith Wynona ..Winston-Salem 
Phillips, 

Mary Ellerf Fayetteville 

Pierre, Judith Faye Durham 



Poole, Sarah Ann Kinston 

Pov.ell, 

Richard Ann Cheraw, S. C. 

Pruett, Ruth Charlotte 

Pulliam, 

Linda Lee Ridge way, Va. 

Rabon, Frances Dunn Monroe 

Rackley, 

Linda Carolyn Rose Hill 

Ratchford, 

Julia Ann Richmond, Va. 

Raynor, Sarah Aifiie Ahoskie 

Reich, Katherine 

Rebecca Winston-Salem 

Rice, Carolynn 

Yutzy Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Riley, Judith Gay Rocky Mount 

Riley, Sara Lynn Wilson 

Riley. Wilma Jean Hillsboro 

Roberts, Martha Anne ..Mt. Gilead 
Robertson, 

Carolyrt Anne Winston-Salem 

Robinson, Willa Ford. Richmond, Va. 
Rogers, Betty Lois ..Wake Forest 
Rogers, Emma Matthis __. Madison 
Ruark, 

Rena Westbrook -.Rocky Mount 

Salter, 

Carolyn Frances -.Marshallberg 
Samuels, Joyce Ferree --Burlington 

Savage, Joe Ann Spring Hope 

Scarborough, Betsy Wood .Windsor 

Scott, Betty Sue Raleigh 

Shannon, 

Patricia Benrfette Goldsboro 

Shanor, 

Elizabeth Lou Morehead City 

Shaver, Miriam Rebecca .-Goldsboro 

Sheets, Lydia Carol Greensboro 

Shingleton, Juanita Ann ..-Wilson 
Simmons, Linda Ann .-Mount Airy 
Simj son, 

Joan Frances Robersoifville 

Singletai-y, 

Judith Dianne Dublm 

Singleton, 

Susan Elizabeth Red Springs 

Sloop, Ruth Ann Dublin, Va. 

Smith. Barbara Allen Raleigh 

Smith, 

Frances Marshall —Richmond, Va. 

Smith. Lee Parker Durham 

Smith, Marvlin Sue -Asheboro 

Sned, Maroia Corrtelia ... Salisbury 
Sparger, Margaret Anne-Wadesboro 

Stalling.s, Eranda Sue -Gary 

Stevenson, Linda Gail Hickory 

Stokes, 

Louise Siewers ..Winston-Salem 



92 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Swain, Ann Wells Washington 

Sweaney, Betty Foushee ..Durham 

Taylor, Alice Kennedy Kirtston 

Templeton, 

Cynthia Diane Mooresville 

Thomas, Alice Marie Statesville 

Thomas, Jennie Lou Ellerbe 

Thompson, Billie Annette ..Ayden 

Thompson, Kent Barnes Goldsboro 

Tiley, 

DiAnrte Kinlaw Merrick, N. Y. 

Tilley, Barbara Stroud __New Bern 

Todd, Carolyn Winston-Salem 

Tolston, Patricia Ann Kinston 

Trotter, Margaret 

Elizabeth Winston-Salem 

Turrou, 

Sandra Louise Annandale, Va. 

Tysort, Ruth Ann Elm City 

Ussery, 

Barbara Dawn Mooresville 

Veerman, Susan Stuart Charlotte 

Via, Helen Rogers Raleip-h 

Von Elm, Nancy ..Lynnhaven, Va. 

Voshell, Evelyn Joan New Bern 

Wade Fredrica 

Mack Fowley Morehead City 

Wainscott, Mary Lynne Durham 

Walker, Gene Frances Burlirtgton 

Waller, Violet Elaine Kinston 

Walters, 

Delissa Irene College Park, Ga. 

Warren, Edith Carol .Robersonville 



Watson, Barbara 

Jane San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Vv^atson, Pamela Belmont 

Welsted, 

Candace Carroll Madison, N. J. 

Weston, Mildred Jane Wirfdsor 

Whitaker, Anna Neal .Bryson City 

White, Patricia Ann Wilmington 

Whitfield, 

Mary Margaret Snow Hill 

Wiikerson, Nell Ruth Marion 

Williams, 

Delia Christine Danville, Va. 

Williams, LaRay Hope. Norfolk, Va. 

Williams, Nancy Ellis Spray 

Willis, Gail Roberts Durham 

Wilson, Betty Carolyn O'xford 

Wilsort, Helen Virginia Monroe 

Wilson, Jane Allene Lincolnton 

Wilson, Judith Ann Miami, Fla. 

Womack, Jane McNeill _ .Carthage 

Woodford, Sylvia Lee Goode, Va. 

Woody, 

Costa Janette ...Plant City, Fla. 

Worcester, Linda Dell Charlotte 

Worth, Margaret 

Elizabeth Southern Pirtes 

Wrenn, Dianne Martin .Mooresville 
Yarborough, 

Patricia Jane Charlotte 

Yelton, Agnes Neleen Concord 

Zealy, 

Libby Hollingsv.orth ..Charlotte 



Specials 



Barbour, Aubrey Elizabeth .Raleigh 

Barbour, Frances Lewis Raleigh 

Bradley, Rebecca Martin Raleigh 

Britton, Margaret Dodd Raleigh 

Brovvn. Wilda Eskew Raleigh 

Buff aloe, Katherine Anrt ..Raleigh 

Campbell, Ruby Kathryn Raleigh 

Coble, Wesley Milton Raleigh 

Coggins, Anna Katherine Raleigh 

Coggins, Frances Rebecca _ .Raleigh 

Cooke, Donna Marie Raleigh 

Cunningham, Robert E. Raleigh 

Daly, Marian F. Clinton 

Davis, Sara Little Raleigh 

Dixoit, Margaret Jayne Raleigh 

Eckels, Alan Matthew Raleigh 

Eckels, Christine Ann Raleigh 

Evans, Evelyn Call Raleigh 

Evans, Timothy Joe Raleigh 



Fisher, Elizabeth Louise.Whiteville 
Franklin, Kaye Raleigh 

Garb, Monica Clare Raleigh 

Geoghegan, Ivey F. Raleigh 

Gilbert," Lena Bryan Raleigh 

Greene, Grace Bailey Raleigh 

Hardy, Lloyd D. Raleigh 

Harper, Billie Raleigh 

Harper, Nellie Raleigh 

Harper, Robert Raleigh 

Henderson, Aulene Powell ..Raleigh 

Hiehfill, Hilda Austin Raleigh 

Hiil, Jeartne E. Raleigh 

Holden, Thomas Cleveland .Raleigh 

Holland, Tyrce Bennett Apex 

Huffman, Carolyn Brady Raleigh 

Hunnicutt, Benja -lin Kline .Raleigh 

Jan, DureSamin Ashraf — Raleigh 

Kaufman, Ann Terry Raleigh 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



93 



Lambert, John Wallace Garrter 

Long, Roy May Warrenton 

Luther, Rachel Woodall Raleigh 

Luther, Vernon Ray Raleigh 

MacNair, Joan C. Raleigh 

McGranahan, Nancy Joan _ -Durham 
McMillan, Virginia Maynard_ Raleigh 

Mann, Margaret Emily Raleigh 

Mann, Narfcy Whedbee Raleigh 

Mason, Max'jorie Prances __Raleigh 
Matheson, Winifred Parker .Raleigh 
Milne, Lynn Piercy Raleigh 

Nolstad, Margaret Camilla .Raleigh 

Northcutt, Janice E. Gary 

Norton, Dorothy Hill Raleigh 

Olvera, John Raleigh 

Pahl, Shirley Dianne Raleigh 

Peacock, Julia Anne Raleigh 

Penny, Ruth Raleigh 

Perkirfs, Nancy Carol Raleigh 

Reid, Margie Beatrice Raleigh 



Rhyne, Linda Cecelia Raleigh 

Sanford, Betsy Knight Raleigh 

Seymore, Johnnie Ann Raleigh 

Shadoin. Anna Kathryn.Greensboro 
Shackelford, 

JIargot Gladding Raleigh 

Slade, Janet Campbell Raleigh 

Small, June Marie Raleigh 

Speck, Susan Carol Raleigh 

Stanford, Thomas Earl Raleigh 

Starnes, Josephine J. Raleigh 

Stov/e, Dorothy Parker Raleigh 

StruDler, Patricia Lee Raleigh 

Swindler, Susie Juanita Raleigh 

Sykes, Carol Lynne Raleigh 

Thompson, Bethel June Raleigh 

Ward, Geraline Young Raleigh 

Weathers, Donna Gail Raleigh 

Whisnant, Joyce Bennett -Durham 
Wilkinson, 

Virginia Stephenson Raleigh 

Younts, Melinda Leigh Raleigh 



Summer Session, 1962 



Adams, Joy Anne Morven 

Alexander, Charles Edward-Raleigh 
Allen, 

Marie-Louise Silver Spring, Md. 

Anders, 

Elsa Cartwright .Herfdersonville 
Arrington, Lynda Copley __Raleigh 

Aull, Emmeline Stewart Raleigh 

Austin, 

Phyllis Carmen Four Oaks 

Baker, Alice Faye Snow Hill 

Baker, Sarah Jean F'allston 

Baldwin, 

Mary Willir.ms Whiteville 

Barbour, Aubrey Elizabeth-Raleigh 

Barden, Faith Murray Raleigh 

Barlowe, 

Harriet Bruce Dodd-Wake Forest 
Barnhill, 

Geneva Undine ..Scotland Neck 

Barrett, Bryna Mildred Raleigh 

Benrtett, Louise Abbott Raleigh 

Bibb, Jcrric Preston Raleigh 

Bivens, Barbara Ruth Monroe 

Blalock, Linda Hamrick Raleigh 

Bradley, Rebecca Martin -.Raleigh 
Brasv.ell, Phyllis Annette --Zcbulon 
Byrd, Jane Eller Raleigh 

Cameron, Shcryl Raleigh 

Campbell, Sue Ellen Raleigh 



Carter, Linda Elaine Chadbourn 

Carver, 

Sarah Louise Roanoke Rapids 

Cheaves, Nancy Rose Spring Hope 

Clirfard, Lelia Thomas --High Point 

Coats, Ava Marie Clayton 

Coats, Phyllis Jean Angler 

Costner, Virginia Ruth Raleigh 

Covington, Elizabeth Burke-Raleigh 

Cox, Nell Jennings Burlington 

Creech, Bonnie Sue Smithfield 

Crowdor, Hildreth Jo Raleigh 

Dark, Carolyn Lee Siler City 

Darwish, 

Sahva Falmy .Alexandria, Egypt 
Davenport, Bernia Jean-Fayetteville 

Davis, Louisa Mcintosh Raleigh 

Dilday, AUie Jane Ahoskie 

Edwards, Barbara Louise _ -Clinton 
Ellis, Betty Jo Siler City 

Faulk. 

Virginia Katherine Smithfield 

Feltner, Karen Sommer Raleigh 

Fishel, Shirley M. Raleigh 

Fishel, Susan Raleigh 

Fisher, Elizabeth Louise-Whitoville 

Fisher, Gladys Sandra Clinton 

Floyd, Mary Kate Fairmont 

Gattis, Phyllis Ann Raleigh 



94 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Gilbert, Barbara Ann Raleigh 

Gilliam, Rebecca Ann Raleigh 

Gravett, 

Katherirte Painter -Roanoke, Va. 
Griffin, Martha Patricia Raleigh 

Handy, Bertha Sue Raleigh 

Hartley, 

Harriett Elizabeth Welcome 

Hartness, 

Evelyn Crystal Henderson 

Haywood, Kathryn Earle Durham 

Hicks, Pefrgy West Raleigh 

Hinson, Helen Pope Kinston 

Holland, Tyree Bennett Apex 

Hughes, Mary Beth Colerain 

Huss, Ann Wright Gary 

Hutchirts, 

Patricia Carson Greensboro 

Jackson, Bonnie Ruth Raleigh 

Jeffcoat, 

Sylvia O'Daniel Wake Forest 

Johnson, Norma Elaine Windsor 

Jones, Janet Faye __ Seven Springs 

Kaufman, Ann Terry Raleigh 

Kincheloe, Shirley Jane Raleigh 

Kinlaw, Peggy Ann Raeford 

Krtott, Ruth Ann Henderson 

Lamm, Betsy Dunn Raleigh 

Lee, Jo Lynn Avett ^_Raleigh 

Lewis, Ruth Tomlinson Raleigh 

Lyles, Lucy Greene Raleigh 

McEachern, Laurie Anne Raleigh 

McFall, Julia Annette Madison 

McManus, 

Elizabeth Lee Albemarle 

Marks, Eleanor Leroy .Laurinburg 

Martin, Penrty Lee Tarboro 

Mathis, Anna Lou __ Ruth erf ordton 
Middleton, Nell Bruchhaus -Warsaw 

Milam, Mary Laslev Raleigh 

Miller, Christine Gritz Raleigh 

Miller, Juliana Concord 

Mintz, 

Elizabeth Anne Norfolk, Va. 

Moore, Janice Belford Raleigh 

Morgan, Mary Louise Oxford 

Morris, Marion Lea Raleigh 

Nance, 

Susan Elizaheth Mt. Pleasant 

Pahl, Diarfne Shirley Raleigh 

Park, Sung Sook Pusarf, Korea 

Parker, 

Elizabeth Anne _ .Richmond, Va. 
Parker, Mary Goforth Raleigh 



Perry, David L. Raleigh 

Pethel, Billie Diana Concord 

Phillips, Danny Morehead -Raleigh 

Pope, Anne Gertrude Magnolia 

Price, Priscilla Watson Raleigh 

Proctor, 
Tilley Adams Fuquay Springs 

Ragsdale, Jev/ell Lee Raleigh 

Rankin, Edith Elizabeth _ .Raleigh 

Ratchford, Emily Jean Gastonia 

Reynolds, Eleanor Hunt Apex 

Robinson, Polly Anna Raleigh 

Rouzer, Mary Susan Salisbury 

Sears, Nancy Stephens Raleigh 

Shackelford, Arthur Hope -.Raleigh 
Shackelford, 

Margot Gladding Raleigh 

Shervette, Lucie Geraldine -Enfield 
Shuman, 

Wynona Patricia Henderson 

Smith, Jeanne Poole Raleigh 

Smith, Sarah Katheryn Wirtgate 

Smith, Thyra Rivenbark Raleigh 

Stallings, 

Christine Hardy Louisburg 

Starling, Faye Creech Pine Level 

Stuart, Fern Dahlstrom Raleigh 

Styron, Nell Joslin Raleigh 

Sykes, Carol Lynne Raleigh 

Sykes, Eloise Edwards Raleigh 

Taylor, Harriet Virginia-Goldsboro 

Thomas, Linda Frances Morven 

Thompson, Gloria Joan Raleigh 

Timberlake, 

Martha Carol Louisburg 

Tomlinson, 

Margaret Barrett Louisburg 

Tsioumas, Evarfgeline Kinston 

Ussery, 

Catherine Elizabeth Kannapolis 

Waters, Martha Babb Cary 

Watson, 

Elizabeth Cleveland Raleigh 

Watts, Mary Virginia -.Goldsboro 

Wellborn, Miriam Doub Raleigh 

^V he t stone 

Sally Rodwell Wake Forest 

White, 

Emma Suzanne Lewis Mt. Airy 

Womack, Jane McNeill ..Carthage 

Wood, Betsy Barbour Benson 

Woodard, Bickey Knightdale 

Wright, Martha Ann Raleigh 

Yniguez, Zenaida Reyes Raleigh 



REGISTER OP STUDENTS 95 

Summary of Students 

Seniors 175 

Juniors 167 

Sophomores 215 

Freshmen 288 



Total Classmen 845 

Special Students 79 

924 
Summer School Students 139 



1063 
Less (For Duplication) 95 

Net Enrollment 968 



Net Enrollment by States and Foreign Countries 

Alabama 1 South Carolina 18 

Connecticut 1 Tennessee 4 

Delaware 1 Texas 1 

Florida 3 Virginia 65 

Georgia 2 West Virginia 1 

Kentucky 1 

• * * 
Maryland 8 

Michigan 2 Egypt 1 

New Jersey 3 Hong Kong 1 

New York 2 Iraq 1 

New Mexico 1 Korea 1 

North Carolina 847 Philippines 1 

Pennsylvania 1 Puerto Rico 1 



INDEX 



Academic Regulations 30 

Administration 8 

Admission 26, li8 

Advanced Standing 2^ 

Alumnae Association, Officers of 14 

Art -it 

Athletic Association 20 

Attendance, Class 35 

Baptist Student Union 18 
Biology 43 
Buildings 15 
Business 45 

Calendar 4 

Calendar, College 5 

Certificates. N. C. 50, 51 

Ciiapel 17 

Chemistry 48 

Chorus 19, 72 

Church Music 67 

Classitieation 'iS 

Clubs, Departmental IS 

Committees, Faculty and Staff 13 

Concerts 68 

Courses of Instruction 41 

Detin's liist 37 
Iiesree, Bachelor of Arts 30 
Degree, Bachelor of Music 33, 68 
Degree Kequiremonts 30 
Degrees Conferred, 1962 80 
Dormitories 15 

Early liecision Plan 27 
Economics 47 
Education 50 
Eligibility 37 
English 54 

Entrance Examination 27 
Entrance Units 26 
Examinations 38 
Expenses 21 

Faculty 9 

Foreign Languages 56 
Foiinilatiou 15 
French 56 
Freshman Year 33 

Geography 79 
German 57 
Oradini; System 36 
Graduation with Distinction 37 

Health IT 

Health Education 59 

History 62 

Home Economics 63 

Home Management House 16, 65 



Infirmary 16, 17 
Kappa Nu Sigma 18 

Latirt 58 
Library IG 
Loan Funds 24 
Location 15 

Mathematics 65 

Music 66 

Music Education 71 

Organ 73 
Orientation 29 

Part-Time Students 29 

Philosophy 76 

Physical Education 59, 60 

Physics 49 

Piano 73 

Political Science 63 

Psychology 75 

Publications 19 

Purpose 6 

Quality Points 36 

Readmission, Former Students 29 

Recitals, Student 68 

Recognition 6 

Refunds 21, 22 

Kegistration 29, .33 

Rej-'iilations Concerning Courses 33 

Religion 76 

Religious Life 16 

Religious Organizations IS 

Reports 38 

Residence 17 

Retention of Students 38 

Scholarships 23 

Self-Help 25 

Silver Shield 19 

Societies, Literary 19 

Sociology 78 ^ 

Spanish 58 / 

Special Students 29 

Speech 55 

Student Government Association 18 

Student Organizations 18-19 

Students, Register of 83 

Students, Special and Part-Time 29 

Summer Session 25, 40 

Teacher's Certificates 50, 51 
Trustees. Board of 7 

Violin 74 

A'ocMtional Preparation 39 

Voice 74 

Withdrawal 40 



(96) 



I 



a 

Q 
(D 



EREDITH is an agency of ihc North Carolina Baptist Con- 
vention and is "modeled and conducted on slriclly religious 
principles, but . . . so far as possible free from sectarian 
influences." 

STABLISHED in 1891, the College is named in honor of 
Thomas Meredith, prominent denominational leader of North 
Carohna in the mid-1800's, who envisioned such an institu- 
tion and led ihc way in making it a reality. 

ALEIGH, a widely-recognized educational center, is the home 
of Meredith College. 



XTRA'Cumcular activilies, as well as academic pursuits, often 
arc integrated into the civic, religious, and business world 
of the Capital City. 



EGREES offered ( 
Music. 



ichclor of Arts and Bachelor of 



NSTRliCTJON is provided by a 54-member leaching staff, the 
faculty-student ratio being 15-7 students per teacher. 



UITION and residence total Sl,300. The student pays 70 per 
cent of the cost of her education. 



ISTORY, sociology, economics, mathematics, business, art, 
biology, chemistry, home economics, psychology, religion, 
church music, organ, piano, public school music, violin, voice, 
English, French, and Spanish are the subjects from which 
ths student chooses her major ficld- 

AMPUS residence numbers 730 sludenta. Commuting students 
the enrollment to approximately 850. 



NE-Hundred Seventy i 



a "Christian altitude toward 
e of the Meredith program. 



IVING and learning on the campus lake place in 13 permanent 
buildings, six of which have been constructed in the past 

VENTUALLY, five additional buildings must be constructed. 
Urgently needed now are a new library, a student activities 
building, and a new gymnasium. 

RADUATES of this senior college for women reside in all 100 
North Carolina counties, 47 slates, plus the District of 
Columbia, and 26 foreign countries. 

XPANSION is in the planning stage. The Baptist State Con- 
vention has asked that the enrollment eventually be increased 
to 1,000 students. 




The 

President's 

Corner 





Tliis hullelin gives tangible evidence of some nole- 
wortliy achievemenla at Mcrcdilli within the past 
few years. Due lo the very limited resources avail- 
able, ihere has been at no time any period of 
phenomena! development, but year by year the 
buildings and campus have grown appreciably in 
efTiciency and appeal. The steadily improving 
quality of service rendered students and faculty, 
though less demonstrable pictorially, has been, 1 
think, equally marked and continuous. 

For the host of friends who have made these 
achievements a reality, all of us at Meredith are 
profoundly grateful. And we hepe that they have 
an abiding sense of satisfaction in the consciousness 
of significant service rendered to Meredith and 
Christian education. 

But, as a worthy life is ever a compound of 
memory and hope, an institution committed to the 
abundant life can property reflect on its accomplish- 
ments only as a basis of confidence in attacking the 
unfinished business ahead. For the successful com- 
pletion of our Development Program in 1966 we 
must rely on the continuing interest and assistance 
of friends already a part of Meredith and the enlist- 
ment of many others in this challenging enterprise. 
I hope that this bulletin will serve as a valuable 
stimulus towards this objective. 



\.A^a*,jt>. ^i^^i^fiC 



THE TRUSTEES 

Meredith's Board of Trustees, members of which 
are elected by the North Carolina Baptist Conven- 
tion, is one of the College's greatest assets. Pres- 
ently serving on the Board are Dr. Charles B. Deane, 
Chairman, Rockingham; C. C. Cameron, Vice Chair- 
man, Raleigh; Dr. L. M. Massey, Chairman, Execu- 
tive Committee, Zebulon; E. L. Rankin, Jr., Vice 
Chairman, Executive Committee, Raleigh; Dr. 
Howard R. Boozer, Raleigh; General Claude T. 
Bowers, Raleigh; Raymond A. Bryan, Goldsboro; 
Mrs. Maude D. Bunn, Raleigh; Rev. Warren Carr, 
Durham; Mrs. Bunah L. Clark, Asheville; Hubert 
M. Craig, Lincolnton; Mrs. Eleanor L. Davis, 
Winston-Salem; Dr. Elizabeth J. Dotterer, Sanford; 
Rev. Paul Early, Greensboro; Rev. Hatcher S. El- 
liott, Charlotte; Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh; Rev. 
W. W. Finlator, Raleigh; Hayden B. Hayes, Hick- 
ory; Mrs, lone K. Knight, Madison; Rev. Roberts 
Lasater, Charlotte; Mrs. Virginia L. Robertson, 
Rocky Mount; Rev. Ernest P. Russell, Concord; 
Dr. Marvin L. Slate, High Point; John A. Stevens, 
Wilmington; W, Hal Trentman, Raleigh; Straughan 
H. Watkins, Henderson; W. Fred Williams, Greens- 
boro; Mrs. Virginia L. Wood, Leaksville. 

THE ALUMNAE 

The quality of any college is perhaps first and 
best judged by its alumnae. The almost 6,000 
members of Meredith's Alumnae Association who 
are responsibly influencing all walks of life are 
community lay leaders as well as nationally recog- 
nized professional leaders. Included in the many 
categories of alumnae occupations are ordained 
ministers; foreign and home missionaries; college 
presidents; scientists; business executives; edu- 
cators; attorneys; judges; physicians; dentists; 
librarians, sociologists; publishers; radio and tele- 
vision personalities: home economists; United 
States Service personnel; writers; artists; musi- 
cians; and, of course, home makers. 

THE STUDENTS 

A degree from Meredith is an indication of genu- 
ine accomplishment. Her students, together with 
faculty and alumnae, measure the College's success. 
Meredith granted 136 degrees in 1963. And in the 
1962-63 regular term, the College enrolled 924 
students. The young women tame from 80 of the 
100 North Carolina counties; from Alabama, Con- 
necticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, New 
Mexico, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, 
Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia; and from 
Egypt, Hong Kong, Iraq, Korea, The Philippines, 
and Puerto Rico. 



"^^^^MClAf 



The dedication and service rendered by the out- 
standing faculty of Meredith have been largely re- 
sponsible for lifting the College to its present pre- 
eminence among the finest senior colleges for women 
in the South. The faculty's scholarly contributions 
have brought academic excellence to the Meredith 
program of instruction; their over-all leadership 
has brought admiration to this institution which is 
enviably situated in the famous Research Triangle 
area. 

Members of the Meredith faculty represent de- 
grees from 77 colleges, universities, and seminaries 
in the United Slates, Great Britain, and Germany. 

The teaching staff numbers about 54. Of these, 
16 are professors, 19 arc in the intermediate pro- 
fessional ranks, and 19 are instructors. Approxi- 
mately 41% of the faculty are men, and 59% 
women, 

According to President Campbell, there is an im- 
mediate necessity for raising the salary scale of 
this group — the very heart of the College. 






Meredith College is a member of the Southern Association 

of Colleges and Schools and the Association of 

American Colleges. Graduates of Meredith are 

eligible for membership in the American Association 

of University Women. Meredith College is a liberal arts 

member of the National Association of Schools of Music. 




Fairctoili Dorniiiory. wilh artow poiniing i- 
lourlh floor inlirmarj', 1926. infimiory "lerapo- 
rsry" for 36 years. 



New Infirmarj-. completed in 1962. 



The present Merediih College campus 



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General Information 



Meredith College, founded by the North Carolina Baptist 
Convention, was granted a charter in 1891, and was first opened 
to students in Scplember, 1899. It was chartered as the Baptist 
Female University, a name changed in 1905 to Meredith Col- 
lege. This last name was given in honor o( Thomas Meredith, 
for many years a recognized leader of ihe Baptist denomina- 
lion in North Carolina, ivho in 1838 presented to the Baptist 
State Convention a resolution urging the establishment in or 
near Raleigh of "a female seminary of high order that should 
be modeled and conducted on strictly religious principles, but 
that should be, so far as possible, free from sectarian influ- 
ences " The institution has had four presidents: James Carter 
Blasingame, 1899-1900; Richard Tilman Vann. 19001915; 
Charles Edward Brewer, 19151939; Carly!e_ Campbell, 1939- 
Meredith's resident enrollment is currently 730. 



Advantages Offered Students 

Many opportunities for all students to participate in various 
activities ... 

Close relationship of teacher and student in small classes and 
in the college community ... 

A libcrul education as preparation for a full life . ■ ■ 

Religion as a part of everyday life . . . 

Capital City location within Intellectual Triangle formed by 
North Carolina State College at Raleigh, the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Duke University at Dur- 



Equipment 

170-acrc campus ... 

Attractive quadrangle composed of administration building 
and library, four dormitories, and dining hall . . . 

Auditorium with sealing capacity of 1,050 . . . 

Classroom building for liberal arts, completed in 1956 . . . 

Classroom building for sciences, completed in 1959 . . . 

New home management house, costing 562,000 . . . 

New dormitory accommodating 100 students, costing S485,- 
000 .. - 

New 32-bed infirmary, costing 8265,000 . . . 

A "Hut," for informal social activities . . . 

An outdoor swimming pool . . . 

A riding academy with 45 horses . . . 



Course of Study For Freshmen 

Usually freshmen register for the following courses: English, 
a foreign language, health education, physical education, and 
three courses chosen from history, mathematics, natural sci- 
ences, and religion. Some variation from this schedule may 
be necessary for students planning to major in art, home eco- 
nomics or music. 



Major Field 

After two years of taking basic liberal arts courses at Mei 
dith a student chooses a major field from the following: 
Art; Biology; Business; Chemistry; Economics; 
English; History; Home Economics; Mathematics; 
Modern Languages — French, Spanish ; Music — 
Church Music, Organ, Piano, School Music, Violin, 
Voice; Psychology; Religion; Sociology. 



Teaching Certificates 



A large percentage of Meredith students qualify each year 
tor certificates in secondary and elementary education. Stu- 
dents intending to teach consult their major departments 
the Department of Education at least by the close of thi 
sophomore year. 



,nd 



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COLLEGE 



Raleigh, North Carolir 



BULLETIN 



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MEREDITH COLLEGE 

The purpose of Meredilh College is lo develop in iu sludents the Christian altitude toward the whole of life, and to prepare them 
for inlrlligenl citizenship, honiemaking, graduate study, and for professional and other fields of service. Its intention is to provide 
not only thorough instruction, but also culture made perfect through the religion of Jesus Christ. These ideals of academic in- 
tegrity and religious influence have always been cherished at Meredith. 



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New Dormitory Completed in 1962 



Admission Requirements For Freshmen 1. Each student applying for admission from a secondary school must rank 
in the upper half of her graduating class. It is to be noted that three-fourths of the current freshman class ranked in the upper 
quarter of their graduating classes. 
2. High school graduates must offer a minimum of sixteen units of credit, distributed as follows: 



EnglisI 



Number of Units 
4 



Number of Units 



Language, history, social studies, 
mathematics, and natural science 
(If a foreign language is offered, 
at least two units in the 1 
must be presented.) 



Additional units from tliese subjects 
or from electives approved by 
Meredith College 

MINIMUM TOTAL 



3. All applic^nla are expected lo lake the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Boord, and the Writing 
Sample given as part of the afternoon teats. Applicants for Meredilh are urged to complete these tests in December or January. 



College Board Examinations 



For 1963-64 the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board will be given for a fee of S5 at 
several centers in each state during the morning on the follow- 
ing dales: 

Saturday, December 7, 1963 Saturday, March 7, 1964 
Saturday, January U, 1964 Saturday, May 2, 1964 
Wednesday, July 8, 1964 

An English essay exercise, known as the Writing Sample, 
has been scheduled for all the College Board's testing dales. 
The Writing Sample may be taken in the afternoon either 
Bcparatcly from the Achievement Tests, at fee of $2, or in place 
of one of the three Achievement Tests to which candidates are 



entitled for the S6 fee. {Applicants to Meredith are not re- 
quired to take the Achievement Tests.} 

Students should consult the Meredith catalogue or their high 
school principals or guidance directors for information con- 
cerning the procedure for taking these College Board Examina- 
tions. 



Considerations For Admission 

Scores made on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, the student's 
Writing Sample, her total high school record, including her 
rank in graduating class and the recommendations of school 
ofTicials, are all considered in determining the applicant's quali- 
ficationa for admission. 



^-^ 



Early Decision Plan 

For the unquestionably well-qualified student who definitely 
desires to enter Meredith College there is designed an Early 
Decision Plan. Under this plan the applicant must take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board before her senior year in high school. She should file 
application for admission to the College by September 15 of 
her senior year, requesting in an accompanying letter that her 
application receive an "early decision" and certifying that she 
is, therefore, applying only to Meredith. On the basis of junior 
year test scores, the applicant's three-year high school record, 
together with a notice of courses being pursued in the senior 
year and recommendations from school officials, the admissions 
officer will accept the qualified applicant by October 15 of her 
senior year- Dormitory students ivill be requested to make an 
advance payment of SSO.OO by November 15. This advance 
payment is not refundable. 



Expenses For 1963-64 

For resident students 

Tuition: instruction, library, lectures and 

recitals, academic administration S 660.00 

Residence: room and board, laundry, in- 
firmary service, maintenance 640.00 
Total SI, 300.00 
For non-resident students 

Tuition (as above) $ 660.00 

Special fees for instruction in music and horseback riding 
are listed in the catalogue. 



Self-Help 

Many students needing financial assistance reduce their ex- 
penses by part-time employment in the dining hall, in the 



library, and in various ofTices and academic departments of the 
college. Compensation, which varies with the character and 
amount of service rendered, usually ranges from S125 to S2S0 
for the year. Initial correspondence concerning appointments 
may be addressed to the President or to the Business Manager. 



National Defense Student Loan Program 

Meredith College participates in the National Defense Stu- 
dent Loan Program. Information about ibis loan fund is avail- 
able from high school principals and guidance directors. 
Interested sludents should write to the Business Manager and 
Treasurer, Meredith College. 



Scholarships 

Freshman Scholarships: Fifteen scholarships, valued at S400 
each, and thirty scholarships valued at S250 each, arc awarded 
to resident members of the incoming freshman class on the 
basis of outstanding scholastic achievement and promise, 
qualities of social leadership, and financial need. 

The freshman applicant who feels qualified and desires to 
be considered as a scholarship recipient should address a re- 
quest directly to President Carlyle Campbell, Meredith College, 
lo accompany or follow the application for admission. There 
are no formal application blanks or competitive examinations 
used in applying for one of these awards. The same credentials 
that are used in evaluating the applicant's qualifications for 
admission are used by the Scholarship Committee in making 
the awards. 

Upper-Class Scholarships: Thirty scholarships, valued at 
$250 each, arc awarded to resident members of the sopho- 
more, junior, and senior classes on the basis slated above. 





Meredith College m a menwer of the Southern Association 

of Colleges and Schools and the Association of 

American Colleges, Graduates of Meredith are 

eligible for membership in the American Association 

of University Women. Meredith College is a liberal arts 

member of the National Association of Schools of Music. 



^^^^^^^ 



Infirmary 
Completed in 1962 





MEREDITH 


COLLEGE 


EXPANSION 


PROGRAM 


Dormitory 


Completed in 1962 



im^-^^. 




Artist's Conception of Proposed Student Activities Building 



BUSINESS FIRMS 

Donors to the Meredith College Expansion Program in Woke County 



Norman Acker's 

Adams-Bryan-Cooper Oil Company, Inc. 

Adams-Terry Realty Company 

Addressing-Duplicating Service, Inc. 

James H. Anderson Company 

A. B. Andrews and Company 

Arnold's Rexall Drugs 

Associated Insurers, Inc. 

Atlas Supply Company 

B & B Cafe 

Bagwell and Bagwell Insurance 

Bakers and Brown Roofing Company, Inc. 

Balentine's Restaurant 

Harold Barbec and Company, Inc. 

De Van Barbour and Son 

Barbour's Esso Service 

Bernhard's 

Bcrnson Rug Cleaning and Storage 

Bolton Air Conditioning and Healing Co. 

Boylan-Pearce 

Branch Banking and Trust Company 

Brjtlain's Inc. 

Burton's, Inc. 

Byrum Lumber Company 

Cameron-Brown Company 

Canton Cafe 

Capital Lightning Protection Company 

Capitol Bargain Store 

Capitol View Inn 

Carolina Builders Corporation 

Carolina Power and Light Company 

Carolina Securities Corporation 

Carpet Center 

Carter's, Inc. 

Cavin's, Inc. 

Cily Ice and Fuel Company 

Cogcins Construction Co. 

Colonial Stores, Inc. 

Commercial Printing Company 

Commercial Standard Title Insurance 

Agency, inc. 
Cooper's F'jrnilii"'c H"i'sc 
Cozart Foundation 
Daniel's 

I-. W. Dellingcr Plastering Contractor 
Delta Real Estate and Insurance Co., Inc. 
Dependable Refrigeration Service 
T. A. Dick Insurance Agency, Inc. 
R. S. Dickson and Company, Inc. 
Dillon Motor Finance Company 
Dillon Supply Company 
Dixie Motor Parts Company, Inc. 



R. L. Dresser Flooring and Acoustical 
Contractor 

Durham Life Insurance Company 

Durham Music Company of Raleigh 

Edwards and Broughton Company 

Edwards Poultry Knoll 

Electric Motor and Repair Company, Inc. 

Electrical Wholesalers, Inc. 

Ellisbcrg's, Inc. 

J. J. Fallon Company, Inc. 

First Federal Savings and Loan Assoc. 

Fisher's Bakery and Sandwich Company 

Food Equipment Contract Company 

Gaitis' Hayes-Barton Pharmacy 

Goodman's Ladies' Shop 

Greene's Laundry and Cleaners 

Gulf Oil Corporation 

Halifax Street Laundry 

Haskins and Rice, Architects 

Heilig-Levine of Raleigh, Inc. 

James Hconis Company 

Honeycult Fruit and Produce Company 

Howard-Green Electrical Company, Inc. 

Hudson-Bclk Company 

Ideal Cleaners 

International Business Machines Corp. 

Ivey-Taylor Company 

Johnson's Pharmacy 

W. H. King Drug Company 

Land's, Inc. 

Lewis', Inc. 

T. A, Loving and Company 

McCrackcn Supply Company 

Maddrcy's Auto Service 

C. C. Mangum, Inc. 

Man-Mur Shoe Shop 

Walker Martin, Inc. 

Maus Piano Company, Inc. 

Mcdiin-Davis Cleaners 

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fcnner and Smith 

Mitchell Printing Company 

Mitchell''; Hair Styling, Inc 

A. B. Morgan Agency 

Motor Bearings and Parts Company of 

Raleigh. Inc. 
Mutual Distributing Company 
Na h-Stcele-\Varren, Inc. 
National Cash Register Company 
National Film Service 
Nehi Bottling Company 
News and Observer Publishing Company 
Noland Company, Inc. 



North Carolina National Bank 

Nowell Clothing Company, Inc. 

Occidental Life Insurance Company 

Offset Printing Company 

William A. Pahl Company, Inc. 

Patterson Travel Service 

Phillips Roofing Company 

Pine State Creamery Company 

E. R. Poole Music Company 

Raleigh Apartments, Inc. 

Raleigh-Hopewell Ice and Coal Company 

Raleigh Linen Service 

Raleigh Office Supply Company 

Raleigh Savings and Loan Association 

Raleigh Tractor and Truck Company 

Ready Mixed Concrete Co. 

Royal Tire Company 

Sanders Motor Company 

Scottish Bank of Lumbcrton 

Sears, Roebuck and Company 

Scrv-Self Food Market 

Shenandoah Life Insurance Company 

Sir Walter Chevrolet Company 

Spic and Span Dry Cleaners 

Sponland. Inc. 

Stahl-Rider Distributing Company 

Standard Concrete Products Company 

State Beauty Shop 

Stale Capital Life Insurance Company 

Stephenson Music Company 

Stockton, While and Company 

R. B, Stokes Concrete Conlraclor 

Strickland's Grocery and Market 

Thompson Cadillac-Oldsmobile, Inc. 

Tire Sales and Service 

Tudor and Ycargin's Beauty Shop 

United Restaurant Equipment Company 

Varina Wholesale Building Supplies 

William C Vick Construction Company 

WKIX Radio Station 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Company 

W-chovia B'jilding Compa.ny 

Wake-Farmers Cooperative, Inc. 

Walgreen Drug Stores 

Fred Whitakcr Company 

R. S. Williams and Company 

Williams, Urquhart and Ficklin 

Winn-Dixie of Raleigh, Inc. 

John W. Winters and Company 

Job P, Wyatt and Sons Company 

Wyall-Quarlcs Seed Company 

Yancey Insurance Agency 



The proposed Student Activities Building will provide facilities 
for day students commensurate with those provided for dormi- 
tory students. It will include rooms for study, lounges, lockers 
and a snack bar. Space will also be available for a book store, 
post ofRce, and social rooms as well as meeting places for all stu- 
dent organizations including the Baptist Student Union, Student 
Government Association, Athletic Association, literary societies, 
and student publications. 



The Eleventh Annual 

Meredith School 

of 
Chnsnan Studies 



Purpose: To bring Ihroughiful ministers and laymen 
together in study and discussion with leaders wlio are 
making major, scholarly contributions to Christian life 
and thought. 



June 17-21, 1963 
Monthly, 8 p.m. — Friihiy, 1 p.m. 



The program Committee acknowledges with grati- 
tude the generous contributions of interested friends in 
providing for the educational expense of the School. 



PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Ralph E, McLain, Chairman; Head of Department of 
Religion, Meredith College 

Olin T. Binkley. President, Southeastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary 

Carlyle Campbell, President, Meredith College 

Harold J. Dudley, Executive Secretary, North Caro- 
lina Presbyterian Synod 

Claude F. Gaiidy, Raleigh, North Carolina 

Richard H. Baker. Bishop of Episcopal Diocese of 
North Carolina 

Carlton S. Prickett, Minister, First Baptist Church, 

Burlington 



General Information 

Location: Meredith College is located on Routes 1 and 
64 at the western city limits of Raleigh on Hillsboro 
Street. Lectures will be held in the College Audi- 
torium. 

Rooms: One section of Meredith dormitories will be 
arranged for four men to share a two-room suite 
with connecting bath. Another section of Meredith 
dormitories will be arranged for four women to 
share a two-room suite with connecting bath. There 
will be a section of suites available for husbands 
and wives. All rooms are furnished with linen, 
towels, and soap. 

Meah: All meals will be served in the College Dining 
Hall. The first meal will be served at 5:30 p.m., 
' Monday, and the last meal at 1 :00 p.m., Friday. 

Book Display: Through the courtesy of the Baptist Book- 
store of Raleigh, there will be a book exhibit in 
the Auditorium Building where books may be pur- 
chased. 

Fees: Through the contribution of interested friends there 
will be no fee for the lecture- courses. Room and 
board fees arc: 

Room and meals per person for 

entire. session $15.00 

Single meals 75 

Room for one night 2.00 

Note: Arrangements for single meals and rooms 
for overnight accommodations may be made in 
advance at the Information Table. 

NOTE: That the opening lecture is al 8:00 p.m. Mon- 
day. 

DAILY CALENDAR 

7:15- 7:45 Breakfast 

9:00- 9:50 Dr. Wright 

9:50-10:15 Refreshmenls 

10:15-11:05 ,.; Dr. Stcere 

11:10-12:00 Dr. Gilkey 

12:40- 1:20 Lunch 

2:00- 3:00 Informal Discussion 

3:00- 5:00 Recreation 

5:30- 6:00 Dinner 

8:00- 9:00 Evening Lectures 






Ui 



EC 



C/3 



BS 

ba 



MEREDITH SCHOOL OF CHRISTIAN STUDIES 




SPECIAL EVENING PROGRAM 
Time: Tuesday 8 P.M. Worship and Discussion 
Drama: Alan Paion's "Cry, (he Beloved Country," 

Presented by The Bishop's Company 
Note: In 1952 The Bishop's Company named in recogni- 
tion of the help given by Bishop Gerald H. Kennedy 
of the Methodist Church, began a program thai has 
conlribuled lo the reviving of the use of drama in 
Christian worship. 

The program is a fully planned worship service 
in which Ihe drama brings its message. There is no 
admission charge, but a voluntary offering is taken 
in the service toward meeting the S 150.00 fee neces- 
sary for [ravel expenses. 

SPECIAL GUIDED TOURS 
For interested persons guided lours of the Research Tri- 
angle, the Stale Legislative Building and the Art 
Museum will be available on designated afternoons 
to be announced. 

AFTERNOON RECREATION 
Golf courses and swimming pools in Raleigh arc avail- 
able. Meredith Library will be open. Air conditioned Stu- 
dent Supply Store will be open all day and will be opened 
after each evening lecture for refreshments and informal 
visiting. 



llOLiCiLAS V. STEERE 
Projessor, Haver lord College 

The grtat Christian classics have 

long been neglected by ChrJsii;in 
people, much to the loss of depth 
in rhe Chrisiian life. The man who 
has pioneered most cITccIively in 
America to acquaint both scholars 
and Ihe average church members 
with those writings which have 
<itood the Icsl of centuries in Chris- 
tian tradition is Dr. Douglas V. 

Aticr receiving his M,A. de- 
gree at Harvard, Douglas Sleerc 
earned another A,B. and an M.A. 
degree at Oxford as a Rhodes 
Scholar, and returned to Harvard 
lo receive his Ph.D. degree. Al- 
ihuugh his leaching career has been al Haverford College where 
he is Ihe Thomas Wisiar Brown professor of philosophy, his lec- 
tureships and responsibilities as Ihe senior personnel member of 
the American Friends Service Commillce have taken him to 
Africa (5 times), several European countries, the Middle East, 
India, Japan, and to twelve graduate schools, universities and 
colleges. In 1961-62 he was Ihe Harry Emerson Fosdiek Visit- 
ing Professor at Union Theological Seminary, New York Cily. 
Theme: The Christian Classics 
Lectures: Pascal, Tltoiighls 
Woolman, Journal 
Kierkegaard, Purity oj Heart 
Von Hiigel, Spiritual Letters 
Monday Evening: Collected and Uncollccled Man 

LANGDON B. GILKEY 

Professor, Vanderbilt University 

Early iwcnticih century Chris- 
tian theology showed comparative- 
ly little concern for the doctrine 
of Ihe church. Recent years have 
seen major efforts lo develop this 
doctrine. Dr. Gilkcy lurns to this 
area for his series of Icclurcs which 
constitute a major pari of his forth- 
coming book in which he relates 
Iheolo{;ieal, sociological and his- 
torical dimensions of this doctrine. 
Since Ihe free church tradition has 
not produced as many sludics as 
olhcr traditions, Dr. Gilkey's heri- 
tage makes his conlribution most 
significant. 

A native of Chicago. Dr. Gilkey 
attended the Ashevillc School for Boys; received his A.B. de- 
gree from Harvard University; and was awarded his Ph.D. 
degree jointly by Columbia University and Union Theo- 
logical Seminary of New York. At present Dr. Gilkey is head 
of Ihe dcpariment of theology al Vanderbilt University and in 
July 1963 he begins his appoinlmeni as professor of systematic 
theology al ihe Divinity School of Ihe University of Chicago. 
Theme: The Church and Ihe World: Problems in American 

Church Life 
Lectures: The General Nature of Ihe Problem 
The Historical Background 
The People of God 

Hearers of the Word in the Body of Christ 
Thursday Evening: Tht Meaning of the Doctrine of Creation 




G ERNEST WRIGHT 
I'jfSior. Harvard Uiiiversiiy 

Old Testament studies have be- 
came one of Ihe most exciting 
iheological inquiries in our day. 
Dr. G. Ernest Wrighl is one of Itie 
scholars who has not only made 
important technical contributions 
in the Old Testament field but has 
also helped the thoughtful layman 
to understand Ihe contemporary 
relevance of the Old Testament. 

After being graduated with his 
.A.B. degree at the College of 
Wooslcr and his B.D, at McCor- 
miek Theological Seminary, Dr. 
Wrighl received his M.A., Ph.D., 
and Phi Beta Kappa at Johns 
Hopkins University. Following a 
year as Field Secrelary for Ihe American Schools of Oriental 
Research, he began his leaching career at McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary. In 1958 he became Ihe Pnrkman Professor 
of Divinity at Harvard University where he now teaches. 

Dr. Wright has written, edited, and contributed lo thirteen 
volumes; is the founder and co-edilor of The Biblical Archc- 
alogist; and since 1956 has been Ihe Archcological Director of 
Ihe Drew-McCormick-ASOR Archcological Expedition lo 
Ancient Sheehem in Jordan. 

Theme: Recent Trends in Old Testament Study 
Lectures: The Nature of Revelation 

The Changed Mood in ihc Household of Wcllhausen 
God's Government: The Structure of Faith 
The Identity of the Prophet 
Wednesday Evening: Archeology, History, and Theology 




BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Lecturers were asked to list their own publications and 
the books they suggest for sludy before, during, and fol- 
lowing iheir lectures. 

Professok Steere ^, 

Pascal, Thoughls 

Woolman, Journal 

Kierkegaard, Purity of Heart 

Von Hiigel, Spiritual Letters and Counsels 

Sicere, Doors Into Life 

Professor Wright 

Rowley, H. H,. cd. The Old Testament and Modern Sludy 

Wright, G. E.. The God Who Acts 

Bright, J.. Early Israel in Recent History Writing: A Study in 

Method 
ibiJ.. A History of Israel 
Weiscr, A., The Old Testament: Its Formation and Develop- 

Anderson. B. and Harrclson W., eds., Israel's Prophetic Heriiage 
Eichrodt. W., Theology of the Old Tuslamenl, I 
von Rad, G., Old Teslamcnl Theology, I 
Wrighl, G.. Biblical Archeology 

Professor Gilkey 

Gilkey, L., Maker of Heaven and Earth 

Niebuhr, H. R., Social Sources of Denomi nationalism 

Berger, P.. Noise of Solemn Assemblies 



«-vl 



.•ft I 



<^' 

> 



Meredith College Bulletin 

Gift Report Issue 



Series 57 



March, 1964 



ISo. 1 




o 



"If we work upon marble, it will perish; if we work upon 
brass, time will efface it; if we rear temples, they will 
crumble into dust; but if we work upon immortal souls, 
if we imbue them with principles, with the just fear of 
the Creator and love of fellow men, we engrave on those 
tablets something which will brighten all eternity." 

— Daniel Webster 




Meredith Today . 



1 



I 



ir 



Donors to Meredith College 
Development Program 
January 1, 1958 - January 31, 1964 



To Our Donors: 

On the following pages are printed the names of you whose gifts to 
the Meredith College Development Program* have reached the Col- 
lege between January 1, 1958 ond Jonuary 31, 1964. 
Meredith publicly and officially expresses through this bulletin its 
gratitude to each of you. 

With your continued help, the College will be able to carry on with 
increasing effectiveness its purpose ". . . to develop in its students 
the Christian attitude toward the whole of life, and to prepare them 
for intelligent citizenship, home-making, graduate study, ond for 
professional and other fields of service . . ." 

* formerly the Expansion Progrom 



2 



MKKKDITH COT^r^KGE 




March 26. 1964 



^ 



Friends of the College: 

In 1958 the Board of Trustees announced a nine-year Development Program 
designed to provide for the most pressing material needs of the College as en- 
visaged at that time. This judgment and action, continually revised in the light of 
changing conditions, assumed that, with the proper appeal, the friends of Meredith 
would help us realize these objectives. 

In the intervening years we have not done all that needed doing, and we arc 
sure that our appeal has not always been as dynamic and effective as it should 
have been. But, as the following pages happily reveal, significant accomplish- 
ments are of record, and a host of friends has made them possible. We hope that 
your assistance is, and will continue to be, a source of abiding satisfaction to you. 
Certainly, Meredith College will be eternally grateful to you. 

There is, as there ever nnust be, much unfinished business at Meredith. 
The completion of this ambitious program must be anticipated by the end of the 
year 1966. Among the most urgent facilities and resources not yet realized are 
(1) an adequate library building; (2) a student activities building; (3) a gymnasium; 
(4) a modern, efficient power plant; (5) an increase, apart from student fees, of 
from $75,000 to $100,000 in our annual operating income. 

And so, along with an expression of appreciation for what has been done, all 
of us must be reminded of the tasks remaining. By any recognized standards of 
measurement, Meredith is even now rendering a distinguished service to its stu- 
dents and the public; but this is not what it should be, and certainly will not suffice 
for the critical demands on education for the future, ^e can properly feel joy in 
a record of achievement only as it encourages and invigorates us to push forward 
and onward. 




Alumnae Giving More 
More Alumnae Giving 



The Alumnoe Division of the Meredith College Development Program 
is the part played by alumnae of Meredith in the ongoing program 
for support of the College — the encouraging of former students to 
make annual gifts to Meredith as an expression of their appre- 
ciation for Meredith's worth to them and of confidence in Meredith's 
future as a leader in Christian education. Our alumnae part must 
be much larger than it has been in the past. We need to increase 
our annual giving to at least 50 "o of all known alumnae — more than 
double the number of former students who have participated in the 
annual giving program in years past. 

In order to accomplish this, the Alumnae Division initiated this year 
a Person-to-Person Visitation Program, with 50% participation as 
its goal, and emphasizing the importance of alumnae making a real 
habit of GIVING ANNUALLY to Meredith. 

Between the beginning of last fall's school term and January 31 of 
this year, approximately 30% of all alumnae had contributed almost 
$46,000 to the College. This percentage is above the national aver- 
age, but still below our hopes for at least 50% participation. There's 
still time! 




Mrs. 
Richard T. Wall 

Coordinator 
Alumnae Division 

of the 

Meredith College 

Development 

Program 



4 



Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31. 1964. 



ALUMNAE 

contributed 
S141,450.48 



Mrs. G. Norman Acker, Jr. 

Mrs. James B. Adams 

Mrs. J. E. Adams 

Mrs. S. L. Adams 

Mrs. Virginia W. Adams 

Lynette Adcock 

Mrs. R. Maurice Adcock 

Reva Ann Agee 

Alamance Chapter 

Mrs. Paul Albritlon 

Mrs. A. Douglas Aldrich 

Mrs. Harold E. Alexander 

Mrs. Burwell Allen 

Mrs. Charles S. Allen, Jr. 

Mrs. J. LeRoy Allen 

Mrs. John Bennelt Allen 

Mrs. Louis C. Allen. Jr. 

Mrs. J. W. Allison. Jr. 

Mrs. Fred J. Allred 

Alumnae Association 

Mrs. Fred J. Ammons 

Mrs. Justus M. .Ammons 

Mrs. Raymond .\I. Ammons 

Mrs. Joe Anderson 

Mrs. Leonard E. Anderson 

Mrs. W. G. Anderson 

Marie Andrews 

Mrs. William H. Andrews 

Fannie Mae Anuc 

Apex Chapter 

Mrs. Donald K. .Appleton 

Mrs. Hackett Applewhite 

Mrs. E. C. Arnett 

Mrs. Joel Arrington 

Mrs. Clayton G. Asbury 

Mrs. G. N. Ashley 

Catherine Atkins 

Mrs. G. C. Atkins 

Mrs. George W. Atkins. Jr. 

Mrs. H. B. Atkins 

Mrs, W. E. Atkinson 

Mrs. Thomas B. Austell 

Mrs. J. L. Austin 

Mrs. D. Glenn Auman 

Mrs. A. R. Avent 

Mrs. Charles W, Averre, III 

Mrs. W. H. Avery 

Mrs. Benjamin T. Aycock 



Nils, k. K. Babini;lon 
Mrs, T. J. Bagby. Jr. 
Mrs. J. A. Bailey 
Mrs. J. O. Bailey 



Mrs. R. G. Bailey 
Mrs. Robert K. Bailey 
Mrs. David D. Baird 
Hazel Baity 

Mrs. H. M. Baker, Sr. 
Mrs. H. NL Baker 
Mrs. Howard Baker 
.Mrs. Mary Farrior Baker 
Mrs. Maylon C. Baker 
Mrs. Pembroke Baker 
Mrs. Lawrence G. Baldwin 
Mrs. Maude Britt Baldwin 
Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine 
Mrs. S. E. Ballentine 
Martha M. Ballou 
Mrs. Carl C. Bank 
Mrs. Paul K. Banks 
Mrs. T. H. Banks 
Mrs. J. NL Banner 
Mrs. Bobby NL Barbee 
Mrs. A. C. Barefoot, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Barefoot 
Mrs. W. S. Barham 
Mrs. Alpha L. Barker 
Mrs. Charles T. Barker 
Nlrs. Gurlev M. Barker 
Mrs J. S. Barker, Jr. 
Mrs. Richard T. Barker 
Mrs. Russell G, Barlowe 
Mrs. Carey J. Barnes 
Nlrs. Floyd P. Barnes 
Mrs. P. H. Barnes, Jr. 
Nlrs. Ralph H, Barnes 
Doris Barnett 
Mrs. Walter O. Barnhill 
Mrs. Harry S. Barr, Jr. 
Nlrs. W. C. Barrett 
Carolyn Barrington 
Nlrs. J. Clvde Barrington 
Mrs. William P. Bartlctt 
Mrs. James A. Bass 
Mrs. John D. Bass 
Barbara Baucom 
Nlrs. C. R. Baucom 
Nlrs. H. \V. Baucom 
Nlrs. II. \\. Baucom, Jr. 
Nlrs. W. D. Beal 
Mrs. W. NL Beamer 
Mrs. Walter L. Bean, Jr, 
Mrs. Georcc Beaven 
Mrs. John V. Becker 
Mrs. C. A. Beddingfield 
Dr. Helen D. Bedon 
Nlrs. Helene K. Bell 
Mrs. H. L. Bell 
Mrs. Janic Britton Bell 
Mrs. O. E. Bell 
Demetra (i. Bellios 
Pegiiv Benbow 
Mrs. R. W. Benbury 
Mrs. R. Knolan Benfield 
Mrs. Gwcn P. Benjamin 
Nlrs. Bruce G. Bennet 



Nlrs. S. T. Bennett 
Mrs. Burtis Benton 
Mrs. P. E. Berry. Jr. 
Mrs. Eucene Berrvhill 
Mrs. William .-N. Best. Jr. 
Mrs. W. Z. Belts 
Mrs. William B. Bierbaum 
Jeannelte Biugs 
Nlrs. NL A. Biggs, Jr. 
Mrs. Richard F. Bigham 
Mrs. Fred Billups 
Mrs. George Birkel, Jr. 
Carol NL Bizzelle 
Mrs. Shem K. Blackley 
Mrs. E. P. Blair 
Mrs. H. P. Bland 
Mrs. Edward L, Bliss, Jr. 
Mrs, William J, Block 
Mrs. K. T. Boatright 
Nlrs. Elizabeth B. Bodkin 
Mrs. Paul B. Boger 
Mrs. Edward G. Bond 
Nlrs. Walter J. Bone 
Mrs. Gray R. Boone 
Nlrs. James K. Boone 
Mrs. F. Herbert Bormann 
Mrs. James H. Bost 
Mrs. K. Eugene Bostian 
Mrs. Dale R. Bourne 
Nlrs. G. C. Bowden 
Nlrs. Frank N. Bowers 
Mrs. H. C. Bowers, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry C. Bossers. Ill 
Mrs. J. Rahn Boyer 
Mrs. James G. Bovette 
Mrs. D. A. Bovles 
Mrs. Wiley Bradley 
Annie L. Bradsher Family 

Partnership 
Mrs. Earl Bradsher, Jr. 
Nlrs. E. G. Brady, Jr. 
Nlrs. Harry A. Branch 
Lillian Brandon 
Mrs. .\. C. Brannon 
Mrs. K. L. Brantley 
Mrs, Sarah Jane N. Brashear 
Mrs. Brady B. Breeze 
Nlrs. Ray Brewater 
Ann Eliza Brewer 
Nlrs. Cov E. Brewer 
Ellen D. Brewer 
Mrs. Ronnie Brewer 
Mrs. Sophi.i K. Brewer 
Nlrs. D. H. Bridger 
Mrs. J. A. Bridger 
Nlrs. James A. Bridger 
Nlrs. R. L. Bridger. Jr. 
Nlrs, Gary B, Bridgers 
Mrs. Wilbur Y. Bridgers 
Mrs. 1 ida P. Bridges 
Mrs. W. D. Briggs 
NIargaret Bright 
Nlyra Bristol .L 

f) 



Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31, 1964. 



Mrs, E. J. Britt 

Mrs. James N. Brilt, Jr. 

Mrs. J. B. Britt 

Anne E. Britton 

Mrs. George H. Britton 

Mrs. J. O. "^Broadwell 

Mrs. Avery Brock 

Mrs. Anne A. Brooks 

Mrs. Ralph E. Brooks. Jr. 

Mrs. Robert L. Brooks 

Mrs. Robert K. Brotlierton 

Mrs. A. C. BroLiyhton 

Mrs. Lorna Bell Broughton 

Margaret Broughton 

.■\nnie E. Brown 

Mrs. Cecil Brown 

Elsie Brown 

Mrs. Fred J. Brown, Jr. 

Mrs. H. L. Brown 

Mrs. L. E. Brown 

Mrs. .Sam Brown 

Mrs. Theodore C. Brown, Jr. 

Mrs. William M. Brown, Jr. 

Mrs. Sarah W. Bruin 

Mrs. George J. Bryan 

Mrs. John C. Bryan 

Mrs. Gayle J. Bryant 

Mrs. Hilery E. Bryson 

Mrs. William Rex Buchanan 

Mrs. James F. BufTaloe 

Mrs. Benson Buff kins 

Mrs. William S. Bugg 

Mrs. Charles Buie. Jr. 

Mrs. Leo B. Buie 

Mrs. L. G. Bullard 

Mrs. M. E. Bullard 

Mrs. T. P. Bullard 

Mrs. Thomas M. Bumpass 

Mrs. John H. Bunch, Jr. 

Mrs. Clara Ray Bunn 

Mrs. John T. Bunn 

Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn 

Mrs. Charles F. Burchette 

Mrs. S. E. Burgess 

Mrs. Walter C. Burgess 

Mrs. Thurman E. Burnette 

Mrs. James D. Burroughs 

Mrs. Julian C. Burroughs. Jr. 

Mrs. C. Tucker Burruss 

Mrs. C. S. Burton 

Mrs. J. M. Butler, Jr. 

Mrs. Fred M. Byerly 

Mrs. Arch D. Bynum 

Mrs. Zachary T. Bvnum, Jr. 

Mrs. Archibald S. Byrd 

Mrs. Earl J. Byrd 

Mrs. F. H. Byrd 

Mrs. James C. Byrd 

Mrs. Roy H. Byrd 

Mrs. T. J. Byrne 



Celia Ann Caldwell 

Mrs. Robert Caldwell 

Mrs. Thomas E. Camp 

Mrs. Daniel W. Campbell 

Mrs. Malcolm Campbell 

Mrs. Winnie Wilbiirn Campbel 

Lottie Canady 

Stizie Canady 

Mrs. Armstrong F. Cannady 

Flora Cannady 

Mrs. Richard L. Cannon, Jr. 

Mrs. Bruce H. Cantrcll 

Mrs. Kirk D. Carawan 

Mrs. F. Alton Carmines 

Mrs. Herman J. Carr 

Mrs. C. W. Carrick 

Amy L. Carter 

Mrs. Cecil G. Carter 

Mrs. J. M. Carter 

Mrs. Larry L. Carter 

Mrs. Roy Carter 





Mrs. R. Roy Carter 
Mrs. Roy T. Carraway 
Mrs. C. W. Carrick 
Mrs. Phillip Cashman 
Mrs. W. Redford Gate 
Mrs. W. D. Caviness 
Mrs. Naomi H. Chambers 
Mrs. Graham Cheatham 
Mrs. Donald Cheek 
Mrs. John M. Cheek 
Mrs. Josie M. Cheek 
Mrs. Carlton Cherry 
Elizabeth Cherry 
Mrs. George B. Cherry, Jr. 
Mrs. Ray A. Chesnutt 
Catherine Chiffelle 
Mrs. Jack Childress 
Mrs. William N. Childress 
Mrs. C. W. Childrey 
Mrs. Hugh Choate 
Mrs. C. R. Christiansen 
Mrs. Irwin Clark 
Mrs. James P. Clark 
Mrs. Walter E. Clark 
Mrs. W. Spurgeon Clark, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert E. Clarke 
Sada Louise Clarke 



Class of 


1908 


Class of 


1909 


Class of 


1910 


Class of 


1915 


Class of 


1918 


Class of 


1920 


Class of 


1925 


Class of 


1930 


Class of 


19.34 


Class of 


1935 


Class of 


1936 


Class of 


1940 


Class of 


1945 


Class of 


1950 


Class of 


1955 


Class of 


1958 


Class of 


1959 


Class of 


f960 


Class of 


1961 


Class of 


1962 


Class of 


1963 


Mrs. Ivey 


L. Clayton 


Mrs. Her 


bert W. Clegg 


Mrs. H. B. Clements 


Mrs. Edward C. Cleveland 


Mrs. W. 


1. Clipson 


Mrs. James L. Clyburn 


Mrs. J. K. Cochrane 


Mrs. W. 


Ralph Cody, Jr. 


Mrs. F. W. E. Coenen 


Mrs. Annie H. Cole 



6 



t 



Mrs. James Cole 

Mrs. W. B. Cole 

Mrs. Edward W. Coleman 

Mrs. Sidney A. Collie 

Inda Collins 

Mrs. A. B. Combs 

Mrs. Ed Comer 

Mrs. J. W. Comer 

Mrs. Burch Compton 

Mrs. Paul B. Cone 

Mrs. B. E. Connor 

Mrs. Clarence Conyers 

Mrs. John E. Cook 

Mrs. William Q. Cook 

Mrs. T. A. Cooke 

Mrs. D. W. Cooper 

Mrs. R. L. Cooper 

Mrs. Roy A. Cooper, Jr. 

Sylvia Cooper 

Mrs. Ralph L. Cope 

Mrs. Eddie Copeland 

Mrs. Eric Copeland 

Mary Lee Copeland 

Hallie Coppedge 

Mrs. Leonard G. Corby 

Mrs. R. W. Cording 

Mrs. G. T. Cornwell 

Mrs. Robert L. Costner 

Mrs. Rufus H. Cottrell, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles R. Council 

Mrs. C. T. Council, Jr. 

Carolyn Covington 

Mrs. Furman P. Covington 

Lena Covington 

Mrs. William A. Covington 

Mrs. A. L. Cox 

Mrs. Ben Cox 

Mrs. Joe E. Cox 

Mrs. Stanley A. Cozzi 

Beth Crabtree 

Mrs. W. J. Grain 

Mrs. Harold Cranford 

Mrs. James M. Cranford 

Mrs. Samuel D. Cranford 

Mrs. Walter C. Crawford 

Mrs. Claudius E. Creason, Jr. 

Mrs. B. B. Creech 

Mrs. William S. Creech 

Mrs. William Creckmore, Jr. 

Mrs. T. D. Crews 

Mrs. R. A. Critchcr, Jr. 

Mrs. Ronald Crow 

Mrs. E. A. Crowthcr 

Mrs. W. Thad Crump, Jr. 

Florence Crutchfield 

Mrs. J.T. Culbreath 

Mrs. James H. Culbrelh 

Mrs. David Cullins 

Jeanncttc Current 

Mrs. Billy R. Currin 

Gladys Currin 

Mrs. Hugh M. ( urrin 



Mrs. Robert D. Dahle 

Mrs. Stanley Dail 

Mrs. B. E. Dale. Jr. 

Mrs. F. Payne Dale 

Mrs. Charles W. Daniel 

Mrs. H. D. Daniels 

Margaret Rose Daniels 

Mrs. Carl M. Daughtry 

Miriam Daughtry 

Berma Jean Davenport 

Mrs. A. C. Davis 

Mrs. Charles A. Davis 

Mrs. Egbert Davis, Jr. 

Mrs. Francis E. Davis 

Mrs. J. Neal Davis 

Mrs. M. L. Davis 

Mrs. M. P. Davis, Jr. 

Mrs. Roland B. Davis 

Mrs. R. B. Davis. Jr. 

Mrs. Robert D. Davis 

Mrs. H. E. Davison 

Edna Frances Dawkins 

Mrs. Howard G. Dawkins 

Mrs. L. H. Dawson 

Phebe Day 

Mrs. Perry L. Deal 

Mrs. Mona Faye H. Dean 

Mrs. Charles B. Deane 

Mrs. G. T. Deans 

Mrs. Floyd Deaton 

Mrs. Charles H. Dcbnam 

Mrs. Ed C. Deese 

Dr. Annie Dove Denmark 

Mrs. Florence Denmark 

Leonita Denmark 

Margaret Denmark 

Mrs. Willis A. Denmark 

Mrs. Gerald L. Denning 

Mrs. Channie R. Dennis, Jr. 

Mrs. H. A. Dennis 

Reba DcVaun 

Gladys Dcwar 

Susan Dcwar 

■Mrs. W. D. Diack 

■Mrs. A. K, Dickens 

Mrs. William M. Dickerson 

Mrs. Robert Dickey 

Mrs. George C. Dickinson 

l.ulie Dickson 

Mrs. Rufus D. Dickson 

Mrs. P. McNeer Dillon 

Elizabeth Ann Dixon 

Mrs. Herbert C. Dixon 

Patsy Ann Dixon 

Vera Dixon 

Mrs. William J. Dixon, Jr. 

Mrs. Ciraham W. Dobbin 

Mrs. A. G. Donaldson 

Mrs. Mary M. Dorsett 

Dr. Elizabeth J. Dolterer 

Mrs. J. K. Doughton 

Mrs. John D. 1 ove 

Mrs. W. B. Dowell, Jr. 



Mrs. William B. Dowell 

Mrs. C. K. Dozier 

Lillian Draughan 

Mrs. William B. Dudley 

Mary Lily Duncan 

Mrs. Malcolm D. Dunkley 

Mrs. Ashby Dunn 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Dunn 

Mrs. Sam A. Dunn 

Mrs. Charles E. Dunning 

Mrs. Edward Dunstan 

Mrs. Joseph L. Dupree 

Mrs. C. H. Durham 

Mrs. R. H. Durham 



Mrs. R. L. Eagles 
Mrs. Bruce H. Eaker 
Mrs. Elmore Earp 
Mrs. Olen Easter 
Nora Page Eddins 
Mrs. Sidney C. Eddins 
Vernie S. Eddins 
Mrs. David J. Edgerton 
Lois Edinger 
Mrs. H. B. Edwards 
Mrs. Joe Edwards 
Mrs. John A. Edwards 
Mrs. Luby L. Edwards 
Rosemary Edwards 
Mrs. S. R. Edwards 
Mrs. Van E. Edwards, Jr. 
Mrs. Wayne Edwards 
Mrs. W. H. Edwards 
Mrs. Willie L. Edwards 
Mrs. Tom D. Filers 
Mrs. J. R. Ellen 
Mrs. B. E. Ellers 
Mrs. Robert D. Elinor 
Mrs. Joe \. Ellington 
Mrs. Boyd W. Elliott 
Mrs. Thomas W. Elliott 
Mrs. William K. Elliott 
Mrs. Yancey C. Elliott 
Mrs. E. W. Ellis 
Mrs. R. A. Ellis 
Mrs. R. C. Ellis, Jr. 
Frances Elrod 
Mrs. William Ely 
Mrs. Burton Y. Endo 
Mrs. Harvey Ennis 
Mrs. Bettv V. Ernst 
CIco Mitchell Espy 
Mrs. W. H. Etheridge 
Mrs. B. B. Everett 



Mrs. James R. Fain. Jr. 
Mrs. Archie B. Faires 
Mrs. Boyd P. Falls 
Mrs. G. C. Fanney 
Mrs. Foy J. Farmer 



7 



Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31, 1964. 



Mrs. Robert C. Farmer 

Mrs. Joe R. Farned 

Mrs. F. W. Farrell 

Mrs. Maurice H. Farrier 

Mrs. R. B. Farrington 

Hester P. Farrior 

Minnie B. Farrior 

Mrs. W. H. Farrior 

Mrs. James D. Fartliing 

Mrs. Jim Farthing, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles D. Faucette 

Mrs. Fred E. Faulkner 

Mrs. Jerry A. Faulkner 

Mrs. Wilbur L. Fay 

Mrs. Thomas T. Ferguson 

Ina L. Ferrell 

Mrs. John A. Ferrell 

Mrs. Richard H. Ferrell 

Mrs. George M. Ferry 

Mrs. S. W. Fields 

Mrs. W. Frank Fields 

Mrs. Charles W. Finch 

Mrs. Jean W. Finch 

Mrs. Talmadge Fish, Jr. 

Margaret Fishel 

Janis Fisher 

Gertrude E. Fitzgerald 

Louise E. Fleming 

Mrs. Robert E. Fleming, Jr. 

•Mrs. William L. Fleming, Jr. 

Mrs. William M. Fleming 

Mrs. Joseph V. Flosman 

Mrs. Joseph Flowers 

Mrs. Lynwood H. Flowers, Jr. 

Mrs. Willie M. Flythe 

Mrs. John G. Formy-Duval 

Minnie Anna Forney 

Frances Foster 

Mrs. Arthur Fountain 

Mrs. J. P. Fountain, Jr. 

Mrs. D. W. Fowler, Jr. 

Mrs. J. R. Fowler 

Mary Margaret Fowler 

Mrs. John C. Foy 

Mrs. Henry B. Franklin, Jr. 

Mrs. John W. Franklin 

Mrs. F. P. Freeman. Sr. 

Mrs. George K. Freeman 

Mrs. Jere D. Freeman 

Mrs. L. E. M. Freeman 

Mary Freeman 

Mrs. R. N, Freeman 

Mrs. Tom Freeman 

Mrs. William C. Friday 

Mrs. Channing H. Fries 

Mrs. James H. Frye 

Mrs. Joseph T. Frye, Jr. 

Mrs. T. Austin Frye 

Mrs. Walter T. Frye 

Mrs. H. Frank Fulahum 

Mrs. David H. Fuller 

Mrs. Sherwood Fuller 

Mrs. Walter E. Fuller, Jr. 



Mrs. William C. Fuller 
Mrs. B. R. Fulp 
Mrs. Phillip D. Fulton 
Mrs. Leon M. Fuquay 
Mrs. J. B. Futrell 
Mrs. J. R. Futrell. Jr. 
Louise Futrell 



Mrs. James H. Gabriel 
Mrs. C. E. Gaddy. Jr. 
Mrs. Herbert F. Gale 
Mrs. Donald Gallacher 
Mrs. Wade M. Galfant 
Mrs. C. Philip Gamble 
Mrs. M. R. Garber 
Mrs. E. Norfieet Gardner 
Mrs. Hugh E. Gardner 
Mrs. John S. Gardner 
Mamie Gardner 
Mrs, M. B. Garrett 
Mrs. Ray Garris 
Mrs. Nat W. Garrison 
Mrs. H. C. Garvey 
Helen Garvey 
Mrs. William Garvey 
Mrs. John F. Gaston 
Mrs. Sterling Gates 
Mrs. Joseph D. Gay 
Mrs. Charles M. Gaylord 
Mrs. Edward J. Gehrke 
Mrs. Joseph W. Gentry 
Mrs. J. Sam Gentry 
Mrs. Alvis O. George. Jr. 
Mrs. Joyce Gerald 
Mrs. Earl S. Gibson 
Lucy Glenn Gill 
Mrs. Bond Gillam 
Kathleen Gilleland 
Elaine LeDhu Gillespie 
Mrs. J. C. Gillespie 
Mrs. George G. Glass 
Mrs. John Glasson 
Mrs. Edward W. Glazener 
Doris Glidewell 
Mrs. J. C. Goare 
Mrs. Ethel F. Godwin 
Mrs. S. T. Goforth 
Mrs. W. E. Goode 
Mrs. Carl Goodwin 
Judith Goodwin 
Mrs. Kent Goodwin 
Mrs. R. D. Goodwin 
Mrs. William S. Goodwin 
Mrs. Richard W. Goldsmith 
Mrs. Alan W. Gordon 
Mrs. John B. Gordon 
Mrs. Waller Gordy 
Arabella Gore 
Mrs. Arthur D. Gore 
Mrs. Robert P. Gorrell 
Minnie S. Gosney 
Lina Gough 



Mrs. J. T. Gould 

Mrs. T. H. Graepel 

Mrs. John B. Graham 

Mrs. C. W. Grandy 

Mrs. George R. Grant 

Mrs. Norman B. Grantham, Sr. 

Helen Graves 

Katherine Gravett 

Mrs. James W. Gray 

Alda Grayson 

Mrs. H. R. Greason 

Mrs. A. M. Green 

Mrs. H. H. Greene 

Jane Greene 

Mrs. Lemuel Gregory 

Mrs. Willis Gregory, Jr. 

Mrs. Alfred W. Griffin, Jr. 

Mrs. Irvin C. Griffin 

Mae F. Grimmer 

Mrs. Archie Grimsley 

Mrs. John H. Guigou 

Crissie L. Gurkin 

Mary Scott Gurley 

Mrs. W. B. Gurley 

Mrs. Ronald C. Gyles 



Mrs. Harold H. Haine 
Mrs. Bruce T. Hainley 
Mrs. Roy L. Haire 
Mrs. Allan Hall 
Mrs. Carlton W. Hall 
Mrs. Cecil B. Hall 
Mrs. C. T. Hall 
Mrs. D. H. Hall, Jr. 
Mrs. M. W. Hall 
Mrs. Romulus Hall 
Mrs. Marion A. Ham 
Mrs. H. G. Hammett 
Mrs. Henry C. Hammond 
Mrs. W. E. Hamner 
Dorothy E. Hampton 
Mrs. G. Shannon Hamrick 
Mrs. A. L. Hardee 
Mrs. Ben L Hardison 
Mrs. R. J. Hare 
Mrs. Allen Harless, Jr. 
Mrs. W. R. ttarmon, Jr. 
Mrs. Eugene F. Harper 
Mrs. J. Di.xon Harper 
Mrs. R. N. Harper 
Mrs. Billy N. Harrell 
Mrs. Sarah W. Harrelson 
Mrs. L. R. Harrill 
Mrs. H. E. Harrington 
Mrs. C. Elwyn Harris 
Mrs. David W. Harris 
Mrs. Everett G. Harris 
Mrs. J. C. Harris 
Dr. Jidia Harris* 
Mrs. Robert A. Harris 
Mrs. Thomas G. Harris 
Mrs. Earl Harrison, Jr. 



8 



Mrs. Humes H. W. Hart 
Evelyn White Harthcock 
Mrs. Robert W. Hartley, Jr. 
Mrs. John D. Hartness 
Mrs. Albert L. Haskins, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederick P. Hatch 
Mrs. George Hatch 
Mrs. George B. Hatcher 
Mrs. Hubert E. Hatcher 
Mrs. John R. Hauser 
Mrs. Leo F. Hawkins 
Mrs. Clarence H. Hayes 
Mrs. H. Vernon Hayes 
Dr. French Haynes 
Mrs. Robert Hayward 
Elizabeth Haywood 
Mrs. R. A. Hedgpeth, Jr. 
Amy L. Heinzerling 
Mrs. Sidney A. Hempley 
Mrs. C. D. Henderson 
Mrs. D. E. Henderson 
Mrs. John L. Henderson 
Mrs. John W. Henderson 
Mrs. Leon Henderson. Jr. 
Mrs. Walter G. Henderson 
Maysie Hendren 
Mrs. R. O. Hcndrick 
Mrs. Calvin W. Hcndri.x 
Mrs. John T. Henley 
Mrs. Mary L. Henley 
Mrs. R. Sterling Hennis, Jr. 
Mrs. Richard L. Hensdale 
Mrs. Gay W. Hensley 
Annie Mildred Herring 
Mrs. Elbert N. Herring 
Harriet L. Herring 
Mrs. Hilton Herring 
Mary Herring 
Nonie Herring 
Mrs. Frank Hester, Jr. 
Mrs. H. D. Hester 
Mrs. Charles E. Hiatt 
Mrs. James D. Hicks 
Mrs. William D. Hicks 
Leiia S. Higgs 
Mrs. Ruth H. High 
Mrs. W. Lawrence Highfill 
Mrs. Myron Hill 
Mrs. William H. Hills 
Mrs. Henry E. Hilton 
Mrs. Haywood Hinkle 
Mrs. Johnny D. Hinsley 
Mrs. G. F. Hinson 
Mrs. Hugh R. Hinlon. Jr. 
Mrs. Fermor W. Hobbs 
Mrs. B. A. Hocult 
Mrs. Tommy Hodgin 
Mrs. G. E. HofTman 
Mrs. E. I). Holherl 
Mrs. Fred C. Holder 
Mrs. Charlie C. Holland 
Mrs. Chester Holland 



Mrs. C. F. Holland 

Mrs. Darrell M. Holland 

Mrs. J. C. Holland 

Mrs. Leon Holland 

Mrs. R. C. Holland 

Mrs. R. E. Holland, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert Holleman 

Mrs. O. L. Holliday 

Mrs. Vivian Hollinshed 

Mrs. W. Claude Hollingsworth 

Betty Jean Hollis 

Mrs. Floyd E. Holloman 

Lilly Holloway 

Minnie Hollowell 

Mrs. Dallas Holoman. Jr. 

Mrs. Edgar E. Holt 

Mrs. J. Edgar Holt 

Velma E. Holt 

Mrs. Frank P. Holton, Jr. 

Evelyn B. Holyfield 

Home Economics Graduates 

Mrs. Chester A. Honeycutt, Jr. 

Mrs. Harold Honeycutt 

Mrs. J. L. Hooker 

Mrs. Charles T. Hooks, Jr. 

Mrs. William F. Hooper 

Mrs. W. Conrad Hopkins 

Mrs. Dewey Hornaday 

Julia Horner 

Savon Horton 

Mrs. T. Eustace Horton 

Mrs. George C. Hoskins 

Mrs. T. B. Hough 

Mrs. John C. House 

Mrs. Louis S. Hovis 

Mrs. Charles B. Howard 

Mrs. John T. Howard 

Lettie Jean Howard 

Mamie Howard 

Mrs. Edward A. Howell 

Mrs. G. E. Howell 

Mrs. James M. Howey 

Mrs. Donald R. Howren 

Mrs. Robert H. Hudgins 

Mrs. Charles Hudson 

Mrs. Karl G. Hudson, Jr. 

Mrs. Mary B. Hudson 

Mrs. Cieorcc R. Hughes 

Mrs. W. F. Humbert, III 

Mrs. Donald H. Humphrey 

Mrs. W. G. Humphrey 

Mrs. James S. Hunt 

Mrs. Thomas Hunter 

Mrs. Fred M. Hurst 

Mrs. S. H. Husbands 

Mrs. J. P. Huskins 

Mrs. Minnie M, Hussey 

Mrs. J. F. Hutcherson 



Mrs. Leslie N. Ipock 
Mrs. Robert A. Ipock 



Mrs. R. W. Ipock 
Mrs. Hunter D. Irving 
Mrs. R. W. Isley 



Annie Marie Jackson 
Mrs. C. Devane Jackson 
Mrs. Edward W. Jackson 
Mrs. John D. Jackson 
Kathleen Jackson 
Nannie Mac Jackson 
Mrs. Oscar L. Jackson 
Theta Jackson 
Mrs. Waldo J. Jackson 
Mrs. Gerald B. James 
Mrs. Grace R. James 
Hilda James 
Mrs. Stephen H. James 
Mrs. J. M. Jarrell 
Mrs. P. W. Jarrett 
Mrs. W. E. JetTcoat, Jr. 
Mrs. William A. Jenkins 
Mrs. Mack M. Jernigan 
Mrs. Harllee H. Jobe 
Mary .Ann Jobe 
Clara Johnson 
Mrs. David R. Johnson 
Mrs. E. D. Johnson 
Edith Brewer Johnson 
Mrs. Elbert N. Johnson 
Mrs. George H. Johnson 
Mrs. James W. Johnson, Jr. 
Mrs. John D. Johnson 
Mrs. Leroy Johnson 
Lois Johnson 
Margaret Louise Johnson 
Dr. Mary Lynch Johnson 
Dr. Meredith Johnson 
Mrs. T. Neil Johnson 
Mrs. Wade Johnson 
Mrs. Wingate NL Johnson 
Mrs. William A. Johnson 
Johnston County Chapter 
Mrs. A. M. Johnston 
Mrs. Ben M. Johnston 
Mrs. Henry Johnston, Jr. 
Mrs. M. L. Johnston 
Mrs. William T. Joines 
.Annie Hollingsworth Jones 
Mrs. Carl C. Jones, Jr. 
Cleo Jones 

Mrs. Clinton E. Jones 
Mrs. Dale S. Jones 
Mrs. Edward M. Jones 
Mrs. Garland O. Jones 
Mrs. George W. Jones. Jr. 
Mrs. Hubert Jones 
Mrs. J. W. Jones, Jr. 
Mrs. Max Frederick Jones 
Mrs. M. T. Jones, Jr. 
Mrs. Peter Jones 
Mrs. Peter D. Jones 







Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31, 1964. 



Mrs. Robert C. Jones 
Mrs. Roland Jones 
Ruth Jones 
Mrs. R. W. Jones 
Mrs. Sidney Jones 
Mrs. V. C. Jones 
Mrs. Cohen E. Jordan 
Mrs. Graydon W. Jordon 
Mrs. R. M. Jordan 
Mary Bland Josey 
Mrs. R. C. Josey, Jr. 
Mrs. George E. Joyner 
Mrs. George W. Joyner 



Mrs. Charles H. Kahn 

Mrs. W. C. Kanoy 

Mrs. Frederick R. Keith 

Alice Jo Kelley 

Mrs. W. O. Kelley 

Chloris Kellum 

Mrs. Paul Kelly 

Carol Elizabeth Kendall 

Mrs. Henry E. Kendall. Jr. 

Mrs. Whitelaw Kendall 

Mrs. H. Edward Kennedy 

Mrs. William W. Kennedy 

Mrs. J. M. Kesler 

Mrs. William E. Kibler 

Mildred Kichline 

Mrs. John Kilian 

Mrs. Frank Kimbrough 

Mrs. P. H. Kime 

Mrs. George E. King 

Gertrude King 

Lucrelia T. King 

Mrs. Robert L. King. Jr. 

Peggy Ann Kinlaw 

Mrs. R. M. Kinton 

Mrs. George Kissinger 

Mrs. Leland H. Kitchin 

Madeline Kivett 

Peggy Klick 

Mrs. Don H. Kline 

Frances Knight 

Dr. lone K. Knight 

Mrs. John E. Knicht 

Mrs. K. C. Knight" 

Mrs. Sam Knight 

Mrs. A. K. Knoizen 

Mrs. Joe T. Knott, Sr. 

Mrs. William A. Knott 

Mrs. Bonner Knox 

Mrs. Chizuko Y. Kojima 

Mrs. M. B. Koonce 

Mrs. Henry J. Kratt 

Mrs. Charles R. Kuhn 



Mrs. W. H. Lain 
Carolyn Laine 
Mrs. Jen P. Lambe 



Mrs. J. D. Lamm 

Mrs. C. Harrison Lancaster 

Land of the Sky Chapter 

Dr. Bessie Evans Lane 

Mrs. I. L. Langley 

Mrs. J. R. Langston 

Mrs. V. L. Langston 

Mrs. E. S. Lankford 

Sophie Lanneau 

Mrs. Chase W. Lassiter 

Mrs. Glenn Y. Lassiter 

Mattie Lassiter 

Mrs. T. J. Lassiter, Jr. 

Mrs. H. T. Latham, Jr. 

Mrs. George T. Lathrop 

Mary Agnes Lattimore 

Mrs. Arthur C. Lawrence 

Mrs. M. W. Lawrence 

Mrs. Tom Lawrence 

Elizabeth Lawton 

Mrs. Herbert L. Lawton, Jr. 

Mrs. James S. Lay, Jr. 

Mrs. Elsie M. Layman 

Mrs. Alfred K. Leach 

Mrs. David C. Leaird 

Mrs. J. C. Leary 

Idabelle Ledbetter 

Mrs. Garland M. Ledford 

Mrs. Luther M. Lee, Jr. 

Mrs. William B. Lee 

Mrs. J. Price Leeper 

Mrs. Watson K. Leese 

Mrs. Bruce LefTers 

Mrs. William A. Leist 

Mrs. C. F. Leonard 

Mrs. William Lee Leonard, Jr. 

Mrs. Sol Levine 

Mrs. Jack F. Lewis 

Jane Templeman Lewis 

Mrs. Wade C. Lewis, Jr. 

Mrs. W. E. Lewis 

Mrs. W. Henry Lewis 

Jean Lightfoot 

Mrs. Roy M. Liles 

Mrs. H. M. Lilly 

Mrs. Earl L. Lindanger 

Mrs. Carlton Lindsey, Jr. 

Mrs. Harold E. Lindsey 

Foy Lineberry 

Ruth Lineberry 

Mrs. Nellie C. Linney 

Mrs. Margaret Hine Linville 

Mrs. Thomas S. Lipscomb 

Mrs. Tyler R. Lisk 

Mrs. Harry B. Litchfield. Jr. 

Mrs. Chester C. Little 

Mrs. Fred C. Lloyd 

Mrs. J. Joel Locke 

Mrs. L. W. Locke 

Mrs. M. A. Lojko 

Mrs. E. A. Long 

Mrs. Nathan Long 

Elizabeth Lovill 




I^ISJi^BP^ 



Mrs. Swindell L. Lowery 
Mrs. Richard W. Loy 
Mrs. A. M. Lucas 
Mrs. William C. Lucas, Jr. 
Mrs. E. B. Luke 
Mrs. A. E. Lynch 
Mrs. Ronald J. Lynn 
Mrs. Ruth A. Lyon 



Mrs. Hugh M. McArn, Jr. 
Mrs. Hubert McCain, Jr. 
Mrs. Carlton McCall 
Mrs. Martel B. McCallum 
Mrs. Llovd C. McCaskill 
Mrs. Richard H. McCaskill 
Mrs. Howard G. McClain 
Mrs. Emily Knott McCleary 
Mrs. C. L. McCombs 
Mrs. John McCracken 
Mrs. Grover C. McDaniel, Jr. 



10 



Mrs. J. Allison McDowell 
Annette McFall 
Velma McGee 
Mrs. A. G. McGill 
Vera Claire McGougan 
Mrs. Charles Mclntyre 
Mrs. Robert A. Mclntyre 
Mrs. Stewart G. McKay 
Mrs. C. A. McKeel 
Mrs. James M. McKenzie 
Mrs. W. C. McKenzie 
Mrs. M. O. McKinney, Jr. 
Mrs. William L. McKinnon 
Mrs. L. E. McKnight. Jr. 
Mrs. Howard G. McLain 
Mrs. Hugh McLean 
Mrs. Joe David .McLean 
Mrs. Henry L. McLeod. Jr. 
Mrs. Ma,\ E. McLeod 
Mrs. C. W. McManus, Jr. 
Frances McManus 
Mrs. H. H. McMillan 
Louise McMillan 
Onetah McMillan 
Mrs. R. L. McMillan, Jr. 
Mrs. W. F. McMillan 
Mrs. Ethel F. McNeal 
Mrs. Ruth L. McRacken 
Jcannelte Mace 
Elizabeth Machen 
Mrs. Eupha Madry 
Mrs. J. Thurman iVIadry 
Mrs. Raymond B. Mallard 
Mrs. Wirt C. Mallory 
Mrs. Charles B. Maness 
Mrs. Paul F. Maness 
Mrs. Martin Manger 
Mrs. William E. Mangum 
Mrs. John L. Markham 
Flossie Marshbanks 
F. Virginia Marshbanks 
Mrs. R. F. Marshburn 
Mrs. J. Alfred Martin. Jr. 
Margaret Martin 
Mrs. Wheeler Martin 
Mrs. William D. Martin. Jr. 
Mrs. W. H. Mashburn 
Mrs. Manlcy Mason 
Mrs. P. H. Masscy 
Mrs. Dave P. Mast 
Mrs. James B. Mast 
Mrs. Clyde Matheson 
Mrs. D. O. Matthews 
Mrs. Hansen S. Matthews 
Jane A. Matthews 
Mrs. J. Moody Matthews, Jr. 
Kate Matthews 
Mrs. Mary Frances Matthews 
Mrs. V. C. Matthews, Jr. 
Mrs. W. E. Matthews 
Mrs. W. H. Matthews 
Mrs. Wilton L. Malthis 
Mrs. Ronald M. Mauncy 



Mrs. A. H. Ma.xwell 
Mrs. Bryan Maynard 
Edith Maynard 
Mrs. George Maynard 
Mrs. James T. Maynard 
Mrs. J. E. Maynard 
Mrs. J. O. Maynard, Jr. 
Lillian Maynard 
Patricia Maynard 
Mrs. Frank Meacham 
Mrs. Rosalind Meade 
.Mrs. Selma E. Meadows 
Mrs. R. E. Means 
Mrs. J. C. Meics 
Mrs. R. H. Melvin 
Mrs. Duncan T. Memory 
Carolyn M. Mercer 
Dorothy Merritt 
Mrs. Gordon K. Middleton 
Mrs. Walter L. Midsette 
Mrs. David E. Miller 
Mrs. Henry C. Miller, Jr. 
Mrs. J. Everette Miller 
Mrs. John A. Miller 
Mrs. Kimball Miller, Jr. 
Mrs. W. J. Miller 
Mrs. Paul A. Milligan 
Mrs. Irene A. Mills 
Mrs. John Mills, Jr. 
Mrs. Ada J. Mims 
Mrs. Whitt Mincey 
Mrs. Lawrence A. Mink 
Alleinc R. Minor 
Mrs, Frank E. Mintcr. Jr. 
Mary Elizabeth Minion 
Mrs. David L. Mitchell 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell 
Mrs. R. L. Mitchell. Jr. 
Mrs. Wiley F. Mitchell 
Mrs. Howard Milchincr, Jr. 
Irene Money 
Mrs. H. Fairley Monroe 
Mrs. D. R. Moody 
Catherine Elizabeth Moore 
Mrs. Georye J. Moore. Jr. 
Mrs. H. B.^Moore 
Mrs. N. Henry Moore, Jr, 
Mrs. Robert L. Moore 
Mrs. W. E. Moore 
Mrs. William A. Moore 
Mrs. Donald S. Moose 
Margaret Moruan 
Mrs. Dan 1 . Morrill 
Mrs. Margaret C. Morris 
Mrs. Robert W. Morris 
Mrs. S. R. Morris. Jr. 
Vircinia A. Morris 
Mrs. William H. Morris 
Mrs. W. Z. Morton, Sr. 
Mrs. J. H. Moses 
Mrs. Vincc Moscley 
Mrs. James T. Moss 
Mrs Russell S. Moss 



Mrs. R. V. Moss 
Mrs. Myra S. Motley 
Linda Motsinger 
Mrs. Harold Molt 
Mrs. Abram J. Moye 
Mrs. Ben F. Muller, Jr. 
Mrs. J. E. Murphy 
Mrs. Douglas .Musselwhite 
Mrs. R. L. Mustian 
Mrs. Frank E. Muth 
Mrs. R. E. Muth 



Mrs. Frederick K. Nance 
Lucile Nanney 
Mrs. Edison Naylor 
Betty Lynn Neal 
Mrs. Raymond C. Needham 
Mrs. David H. Nelson 
Mrs. Joseph T. Nelson 
Mrs. Robert S. Nelson 
Mrs. James S. Newbold 
Jennie Reid Newby 
Mrs. Charles B. Newcomb 
Mrs. J. H. Newell 
Mrs. Leslie Newman 
Mrs. W. Harold Newman 
Mrs. A. L. Newsom, Jr, 
Mrs. Charles R. Newsom 
Linda Newton 
Mrs. J. G. Nichols 
Mrs. Edward Nicholson 
Mrs. Hontas Norfleet 
Martha Jean Norman 
Jacquelyn Norris 
Mrs. John A. Norris 
Mrs. William H. Norris 
Mrs. Lamar N. Northup 
Mrs. Charles S. Norwood 
Mrs. J. D. Norwood 
Mrs. J. W. Norwood 
Vivian Nowell 



Mrs. C. E. Oakley 

Mrs. J. T. Odom 

Mrs. Waldo Oehman, Jr. 

Mrs. R. G. Ogburn 

Mrs. Thomas L. Otburn 

Idalia Oclesbv 

Nancv G. Old 

Mrs. E. E. Olive 

Mrs. Howard Olive 

Mrs. James Olive 

Lownerv Olive 

Mvra Olive 

Mrs. Nell F. Olive 

Mildred Oliver 

Mrs. Raymond A. Oliver, Jr. 

Mrs. Rudolph E. Oliver 

Mrs. T. D. O'Quinn 

Mrs. Joseph R. Overby 



II 



Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31. 1964. 



Mrs. L. S. Overstreet 
Mrs. Wiiyne Overton 
Mrs. L. J. Owen 
Mrs. Albert E. Owens 
Mrs. H. M. Owens 
Mrs. Otto Owens 



Mrs. Frank S. Pace, Jr. 

Mrs. Fuller Pace 

Mrs. F. H. Page 

Mrs. Hiiizh W. Page 

Mrs. EdwarJ H. Pahl 

Mrs. H. H. Palmer 

Mrs. Benjamin W. Parham 

Mrs. Francis T. Parham 

Mrs. R. H. Park 

Mrs. Clarence D. Parker 

Flora Ethel Parker 

Mrs. Harry O. Parker 

Mrs. John B. Parker 

Mrs. Louis O. Parker 

Mrs. Ogden Parker 

Mrs. Roland F. Parker 

Mrs. T. W. Parker 

Mrs. Walton Parker. Jr. 

Mrs. W. W. Parker 

Mrs. G. T. Parkin 

Mrs. Truman Parmele 

Mrs. David R. Parnell 

Claudia Louise Parrish 

Mrs. James Parrott 

Mrs. Tom Parrott 

Rosa Paschal 

Mrs. L. H. Pate 

Mrs. H. B. Patterson 

Mrs. K. H. Patterson 

Mrs. Robert P. Patterson 

Mrs. Thomas Patterson 

Janice Paul 

Mrs. Paul E. Peabody, Jr. 

Mrs. A. B. Peacock 

Mrs. John S. Peacock 

Mrs. C. L. Pearce 

Marjorie R. Pearce 

Mrs. Chilton Pearson 

Mrs. Thomas E. Peatross 

Mrs. H. G. Peck 

Mrs. T. R. Pender 

A. Ruth Jenney 

Mrs. Elder F. Penny 

Mrs. Thomas H. Perdue 

Mrs. L. P. Perkins, Sr. 

Mrs. Robin H. Perkins 

Lucy Perkinson 

Mrs. J. Olin Pcrritt 

Mrs. Clifford Perry 

Mrs. Clyde R. Perry 

Mrs. Dow V. Perry 

Mrs. E. P. Perry 

Mrs. Mack D. Perry, Jr. 

Julia C. Peterson 

Mrs. Martin R. Peterson, Jr. 



Mrs. S. Bruce Petteway 
Mrs. D. Earl Petty 
Mrs. Arthur G. Phifer 
Mrs. Bill W. Phillips 
Mrs. Carl L. Phillips 
Mrs. Guy Phillips 
Mrs. R. A. Phillips 
Mrs. Roy E. Phillips 
Mrs. Edmund J. Piaski 
Mrs. James W. Pickard 
Mrs. George Pickering 
Dr. Ella J. Pierce 
Mrs. Roy E. Piner 
Mrs. David Pinkas 
Mrs. Charles H. Pinner 
Mrs. Roger R. Pitman 
Mrs. James L. Pittman 
Mrs. L. A. Pittman, Jr. 
Mrs. Paul H. Pittman, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert E. Pittman 
Mrs. Richard Pittman 
Mrs. Joseph D. Plowman 
Jean E. Pollock 
Mrs. Robert E. Pomeranz 
Mrs. Robert A. Ponton 
Mrs. Frank Pool 
Mrs. J. G. Poole 
Mrs. Lewis M. Poole 
Mrs. W. Gordon Poole 
Mrs. R. Hunter Pope 
Mrs. William H. Pope 
Mrs. Arthur W. Porter 
Mrs. James M. Potter, Sr. 
Mrs. James M. Potter, Jr. 
Mrs. Frank L. Powell 
Mrs. J. Dewey Powell 
Mrs. S. E. Powell 
Mrs. W. G. Powell 
Mrs. W. H. Powell 
Mrs. William S. Powell 
Dr. Ellen J. Preston 
Mrs. Edwin S. Preston, Jr. 
Dr. Helen Price* 
Mrs. E. W. Price, Jr. 
Mrs. Gerald Primm 
Mrs. Jimmy H. Prince 
Mrs. H. B. Pritchard 
Barre Prilchett 
Mrs. Jimmie C. Proctor 
Mrs. George B. Pruden 
Mrs. Bland Pruitt 
Mrs. W. H. Pryor 



Mrs. A. C. Rabb 
Mrs. Thomas R. Rainey 
Mrs. Jake A. Ramseur 
Mrs. Henry M. Ramseur 
Mrs. Herbert W. Ramsey 
Mrs. W. K. Rand 
Mrs. James Randall 
Mrs. E. A. Randolph 
Mrs. Edward L. Rankin 



Mrs. Ogden Jf. Rankin 

Mrs. Emery Raper, Jr. 

Mrs. Jack M. Rascoe 

Mrs. Dan J. Ratchford 

Mrs. D. A. Rawley 

Mrs. John C. Rawlins 

Mrs. H. D. Rawls 

Mrs. S. W. Rawls 

Mrs. Burton J. Ray 

Mrs. M. E. Ray 

Mrs. Wyman M. Raynor 

Mrs. Frank W. Reams 

Mrs. Howard M. Reaves 

Mrs. Ben G. Reeves 

Mrs. John B. Regan 

Mrs. James W. Reid 

Mrs. Robert O. Reid 

Mrs. Robert L. Remsburg 

Mrs. R. E. Rettew 

Mrs. Ray V. Revels 

Mrs. Millard Rewis 

Mrs. Eleanor H. Reynolds 

Mrs. R. L. Rhodes, Jr. 

Mrs. O. N. Rich 

Mrs. A. J. Richards, Jr. 

Mrs. David Richardson 

Mrs. E. R. Richardson 

Mrs. Joe Richardson 

Mrs. Robert L. Richardson 

Mrs. Raymond E. Ricks 

Mrs. J. G. Riddick 

Mrs. Durham G. Riddle 

Mrs. B. R. Ridenhour 

Mrs. Orval R. RifTe 

Harriet Rivers 

Mrs. Stephen L. Roberson 

Mrs. H. W. Roberts 

Mrs. Ruth Dial Roberts 

Mrs. Joseph R. Robertson 

Mrs. Leon W. Robertson 

Mrs. Raymond Robertson 

Mrs. David J. Robinson 

Josephine G. Robinson 

Mrs. Nisbet P. Rodgers 

Mrs. Wills P. Rodgers, Jr. 

Mrs. Clyde E. Rodwell 

Aileen E. Rogers 

Dr. Carmen Rogers 

Mrs. Charles N. Rogers 

Mrs. Earle J. Rogers 

Mrs. Harding W. Rogers, Jr. 

Mrs. J. Pointer Rogers 

Mrs. L. J. Rogers 

Mrs. Marion Rogers 

Harriet Rose 

Mrs. I. W. Rose 

Dr Norma Rose 

Mrs. A. N. Roupas 

Mrs. Harold F. Rouse 

Ann Rowe 

Mrs. A. Lee Royal 

Mrs. C. S. Royal 

Mrs. D. M. Royal 



12 



Mrs. J Sebron Royal 
Esther F. Royster 
Mrs. Henry G. Ruark 
Mrs. Joseph C. Ruark 
Mrs. J. A. Riitlisill, Jr. 
Helen Riiffin 

Mrs. Donald R. Riimmler 
Mrs. W. E. Ruppelt 
Mrs. William D. Rusher 
Mrs. Ernest P. Russell f 

Mrs. Arnold Saaf 
Mrs. James D. Samuels 
Mrs. Robert Sandercock 
Mrs. Edgar F. Sanders 
V. Louise Sanderson 
Mrs. George Sandlin 
Mrs. Fred Sandusky 
Mrs. Virginia P. Sanner 
Mrs. Woodrow A. Sarvis 
Mrs. Robert H. Sasser, Jr. 
Mrs. Daniel Satisky 
Mrs. L. B. Satterfield 
Mrs. Clyde Satterwhite 
! Mrs. Harold Satterwhite, Jr. 
Mrs. Mac Satterwhite 
Mrs. Rex Savery 
Mrs. J. H. Sawyer 
Mrs. K. D. Saylor 
Mrs. M. L. Scaggs 
Mrs. Robert A. Scaggs 
MiN William L. Scarboro 
ill Scarborough 
Mrs. Rae Scarborough 
Mrs. E. F. Schnedl 
Mrs. Roy O. Scholz 
Mrs. Forrest F. Schrum, Jr. 
Mis, E. C. Schuchardt 
MiN. Martin Schulken 
Stniland County Chapter 
\lis. Council M. Scott 
Jeanette Scott 
Mis. Ray Scott 
Millie Jean Scruggs 
Mi . Alma D. Seawell 
M iiy Robert .Seawell 
M Neal W. Secgars 
M Neil I.. Senter 
\l G. W. Sermons 
M , J. F. Severance 
Ml David E. Scwell 
Ml John R. Sexton. Jr. 
Ml A. T. Seymour. Sr. 
Mis Doris B. .Seymour 
Mis Joseph Shannon, III 
Ml V M. A. Shaver « 

Ml A. E. Shaw, Jr. 
Ml Ben L. Shaw 
M I Henry M. Shaw 
Ml Reuben A. Shaw 
Ml Robert A. Shaw 
Ml J. D. Shcarin 



Mrs. R. F. Shcarin 

Mrs. R. N. Shearon 

Mrs. J. C. Shell 

Mrs. Henry F. Sherrill 

Mrs. Charles R. Shields 

Mrs. Harold 1. Shoemaker 

Mrs. Jack Shogren 

Mrs. Thomas Shore 

Mrs. James R. Short 

Mrs. Thomas G. Shuler 

Mrs. Charles J. Shupp 

Mrs. Christian F. Siewers 

Mrs. Algernon F. Sigmon, Jr. 

Mrs. G. L. Simmons 

Mrs. Roger W. Simmons 

Mrs. Albert E. Simms 

Mrs. Benjamin W. Simons 

Donnie H. Simons 

Mrs. Frederick Simpich, III 

Mrs. Edward J. Simpson 

Mrs. William H. Simpson 

Mrs. June Singletary, Jr. 

Mrs. Kestcr A. Sink 

Mrs. Frank B. Skinner 

Mrs. Frank L. Skinner 

Margaret E. Slate 

Mrs. Elsie B. Sledd 

Mrs. Billy Smith 

Mrs. Budd Smith 

Mrs. C. B. Smith 

Mrs. C. S. Smith 

Dorothy E. Smith 

Mrs. Douglas Smith 

Mrs. Earle P. Smith 

Mrs. Edmund T. Smith 

Mrs. Harry Lee Smith 

Mrs. J. Ed Smith 

Mrs. Mark L. Smith 

Mrs. Orville Smith 

Mrs. Sanford H. Smith 

Mrs, Truman S. Smith 

Mrs. W. Arnold Smith 

Mrs. William Marion Smith 

Mrs. William Marvin Smith 

Mrs. William S. Smith, Jr. 

Mrs. David M. Smoot 

Mrs. T. Barton Smoot 

Mrs. C. L. Snipes 

Mrs. Russell G. Snipes 

Mrs. Donald H. Snodgrass 

Mrs. H. Linwood Snowa 

Belly Ann Snyder 

Mrs! D. H. Snyder 

Mrs. E. C. Snyder 

Mrs. James E. Snyder 

Mrs. Lowell F. Sodcman 

Mrs. S. E. Southerland 

Mrs. Jason L. .Sox, Jr. 

Mrs. T. S. Speight 

Mrs. Holly Sphar 

Martha Gray Spcnce 

Mrs. J. M. Spoon 

Mrs. W. M. Spurrier 



Mrs. G. Douglas Squillario 

Mrs. R. M. Squires 

Ruamie Squires 

Mrs. F. B. Stackhouse 

Mrs. J. J. Stafford, Jr. 

Doris Ann Stainback 

Mrs. Ray Stallings 

Mrs. Gerald F. Stamps 

Mrs. T. M. Stanback 

Mrs. Raney Stanford 

Mrs. E. M. Stanley 

Mrs. William D. Stanley 

Mrs. James A. Starling, Jr. 

Mrs. Joseph .•\. Staton 

Mrs. .'knnie H. St. Clair 

Mrs. Harold Steadman 

Mrs. Emmet H. Steger 

Mrs. E. B. Stem 

•Mrs. I. J. Stephens 

Mrs. Mallie B. Stephens 

Mrs. R. O. Stephens 

Mrs. T. N. Stephens 

Mrs. Bennett Stephenson 

Mrs. Wiley C. Stephenson, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles E. Stevens 

Mrs. Chalmas Stewart 

Mrs. C. P. Stewart 

Mrs. Dura Stewart 

Mrs. S. W. Stewart 

Mrs. C. W. Stickney 

Elizabeth Stillwell 

Olive Stokes 

Mrs. Hazel W. Stone 

Mrs. J. Baird Stovall 

Mrs. Edward L. Straight 

Mrs. Thomas P. Stratford 

Mrs. Herman Strayhorn 

Mrs. B. A. Strickland 

Mrs. B. Leslie Strickland 

Mrs. H. H. Strickland 

Margaret L. Strickland 

Mrs. Roscoe C. Strickland 

Mrs. Teddy R. Strickland 

Mrs. J. P. Slrole 

Berlha Mae Stroud 

Beulah Stroud 

Mrs. Clarence Stroud 

.Mrs. A. C. Stuart, Jr. 

Mrs. C. J. Stuart 

Mrs. Joe Sturdivant 

Mrs. C. W. Suggs 

Mrs. Charles S. Sullivan 

Mrs. Coleman N. Sullivan 

Mrs. Robert A. Sullivan 

Mrs. R.L. Summcrlin 

Mrs. Wade Surratt, Jr. 

Mrs. A. J. Sutter 

Mrs. David B. Sutton 

Mrs. Edward \. Sutton 

Mrs. J. L. Sutlon 

Mrs. Roger N. Sulton, Jr. 

Mrs. Clyde H. Swann 



13 



Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31, 1964. 



Mrs. Erick Swenson 
Mrs. Frederick J. Swift 



Mrs. Robert L. Talley 

Grace Talton 

Mrs. Burton H. Taylor 

Mrs. H. J. Taylor 

Jenny Lou Taylor 

Mrs. Kenneth M. Taylor 

Mary Taylor 

Mrs. Robert L. Taylor, Jr. 

Shirley Bell Taylor 

Mrs. Thomas L. Taylor 

Mrs. Edward Teague 

Mrs. J. U. Teague 

Mary Katherine Teague 

Mrs. Samuel F. Teague 

Mrs, Jennings B. Teal 

Mrs. Charles R. Tedder 

Mrs. Alton L. Temple 

Mrs. Douglas Temple, Jr. 

Mrs. W, G. Temple 

Mrs. Roy Tew 

Mrs. Tommie H. Tharrington 

Mrs. Cleveland Thayer 

Mrs. Harold M. Thomas 

Mrs. J. C. Thomas 

Louise Thomas 

Mrs. Nelson Thomas, Jr. 

Sarah E. Thomas 

Mrs. Walter J. Thomasson, Jr. 

Mrs. Bill Thompson 

Mrs. Elizabeth J. Thompson 

Mrs. E. N. Thompson 

Mrs. George Thompson, III 

Mrs. Harry Thompson 

Mrs. Conway Thornburgh 

Mrs. William H. Thome, Jr. 

Mrs. H. T. Thornton, Jr. 

Vara Lee Thornton 

Mrs. Paul H. Tigar 

Mary Tillery 

Mrs. Bert Q. Tilley 

Mrs. J. P. Timberlake, Jr. 

Margaret B. Tomlinson 

Mrs. Walter L. Tippett 

Mrs. Leslie K. Todd 

Mrs. Charles Tomasino 

Mrs. A. S. Tomlinson 

Mrs. David A. Tousignant 

Mrs. Gordon L. Townsend 

Mrs. W. Harold Trentman 

Mrs. R. R. Trevathan 

Mrs. William G. Trexler, Jr. 

Dr. Phyllis Trihble 

Joyce Tripp 

Mrs. James O. Trogdon 

Mrs. Kennard S. Trowbridge, Jr. 

Mrs. Frank O. Truslow 

Donna T. Tucker 

Mrs. Royster M. Tucker 

Mrs. Verne W. Tunstall 



Mrs. J. E. Turlington 
Mrs. Roscoe Turlington 
Mrs. J. Piatt Turner, Jr. 
Mrs. Mangum Turner 
Mrs. James K. Tyler 
Mrs. B. Y. Tyner 
Ruthe Tyson 



Mrs. Frances J. Umstead 
Mrs. Marilyn M. Upchurch 
Mrs. T. A. Upchurch 
Mrs. George W. Urwick, Jr. 
Mrs. Calvin H. Ussery 
Mrs. William S. Utiey 
Mrs. Ruby P. Uzzle 



Dr. Ruth M. Vande Keift 

Dorothy Vann 

Dr. Elizabeth Vann 

Mrs. J. Graves Vann 

Mrs. William S. Vann 

Mrs. H. N. Van Nostrand, III 

Mrs. Marion D. Varnedoe 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Vaughan 

Mrs. Richard Vehslage 

Dolly Sue Vernon 

Mrs. J. H. Vernon, Jr. 

Mrs. J. H. Vernon, Sr. 

Mrs. J. S. Vetter 

Mrs. C. E. Vick 

Mrs. R. E. Vick 

Mrs. Joseph S. Vincent 



Mrs. Marvin Wade 
Mrs. Hoke A. Wagoner 
Jane Wagoner 
Mrs. J. 1. Wagoner 
Mrs. W. R. Wagoner 
Mrs. Irving H. Wainwright 
Wake County Chapter 
Mrs. Charles Z. Walker, Jr. 
Mrs. E. P. Walker 
Mrs. Frederick G. Walker 
Mrs. J. A. Walker 
Mrs. James B. Walker 
Mrs. John W. Walker 
Mrs. J, S. Walker 
Mrs. Harold B. Wall 
Mrs. Marvin W. Wall 
Mrs. Percy L. Wall 
Mrs. Richard T. Wall 
Mrs. James E. Wallace 
Nancy Wallace 
Mrs. W. C. Wallace 
Mrs. Wesley H. Wallace 
Lois Waller 

Mrs. Lacy Wayne Walters 
Mrs. Robert A. Walters 
Mrs. Frank P. Ward 
Mrs. Henry D. Ward 



Rebecca C. Ward 
Mrs. Jack Wardlaw 
Mrs. E. Worth Warner 
Mrs. Alton E. Warren 
Mrs. C. H. Warren 
Mrs. Max G. Warren 
Mrs. Michael W. Wasell 
Mrs. Bryant Waters 
Mrs. Cary K. Watkins 
Mrs. Howard W. Watkins 
Mrs. Lettie M. Watkins 
Lillian Watkins 
Louise T. Watkins 
Mrs. William A. Watkins 
Mrs. George D. Watson 
Mrs. James E. Watson, Jr. 
Mrs. Norman T. Watson 
Mrs. J. B. Watts 
Mrs. Glenn W. Watts 
Mrs. William M. Watts 
Mrs. Spencer Waynick 
Mrs. Robert I. Weatherford 
Mrs. Ruth P. Webb 
Mrs. H. F. Wehlitz 
Mrs. John D. Welch 
Mrs. Ethel H. Weldon 
Mrs. J. McSherry Wells 
Mrs. Sim H. Wells 
Mabel West 
Mrs. Rupert E. West 
Mrs. W. Wayne West 
Mrs. S. E. Westbrook 
Mrs. Carl S. Wester 
Mrs. H. C. Westin 
Mrs. John L. Whaley 
Mrs. W. L. Wharton 
Mrs. Lowell M. Whatley 
Lt. Ruth Carole Whedbee 
Mrs. Louis A. Wheless 
Mrs. R. G. Whitaker 
Mrs. Ernest L. Whitbeck 
Anne Hardaway White 
Mrs. Guy H. White, III 
Mrs. Howard White 
Mrs. J. Clark White 
Mrs. R. B. White 
Mrs. Roger White 
Mrs. W. H. White 
Mrs. Blount Whiteside, Jr. 
Mrs. Richard C. Whitfield 
Mrs. Lucius Whitley 
Mrs. A. D. Wilder 
Mrs. Bob A. Wilder 
Mrs. J. E. Wilder 
Mrs. John A. Wiley 
Mrs. E. C. Wilkie 
Mrs. Bruce M. Wilkins 
Mrs. T. P. Willard 
Annie Grace Williams 
Mrs. B. F. Williams 
Mrs. Byron L. Williams 
D. Evalan Williams 
Mrs. Harry M. Williams, Jr. 



14 



Mrs. James E. Williams, Jr. 

Mrs. Joe C. Williams 

Leah Rose Williams 

Mildred Williams 

Nancy E. Williams 

Mrs. Russell Williams 

Mrs. W. Fred Williams 

Mrs. W. Lunsford Williams 

Mrs. Jack Williamson. Jr. 

Mrs. Thomas W. Williamson 

Mrs. William B. Williamson, Jr. 

Mrs. E. G. Williard 

Mrs. A. R. Willis 

Mrs. James B. Willis. Jr. 

Mrs. Carl C. Wilson 

Mrs. Charles B. Wilson 

Mrs. Donald Wilson 

Mrs. Paul Wilson 

Sidney Ann Wilson 

Mrs. W. Graham Wilson 

Mrs. W. P. Wilson 

Mrs. Lloyd N. Winslow 

Mrs. Harris Woltz 

Mrs. Thomas M. Womble, Jr. 

Mrs. Lloyd N. Winslow 

Mrs. Henry A. Wood 
i Mrs. Harry D. Wood, Jr. 
I Mrs. Loyd Wood 
i Mrs, W. S. Wood 
I Lucille Woodall 
I Mrs. J. C. Woodard 
I Mrs. Richard Woodard 
I Mrs. Richard P. Woodbury 
I Mrs. W. W. Wooden 
j Mrs. William W. Woods 
I Mrs. M. T. Woody 

Mrs. James Work 

Mrs. David C. Worth 

Mrs. William J. Wortman 

Mrs. Edwin E. Wright 

Mrs. Jake H. Wright, Jr. 

Mrs. William B. Wright 

Mrs. Edgar M. Wyatt 

Mrs. John Wyatt 

Mrs. William L. Wyatt 



Mrs. J. E. Yarboro 
Mrs. Cecil M. Yarbrough 
Dr. Mary E. Yarbrough 
Mrs. Edwin W. Yates 
Mrs. S. A. Yates 
Betty Jean Yeager 
Ruth Yelvington 
Mrs. Fred Payne York 
Mrs. R. C. Young 
Mrs. R. E. Young 



Mrs. Cullen C. Zimmerman 
* Honorary Alumnae 



BAPTIST STATE 
CONVENTION 
AND LOCAL 
CHURCHES 

contributed 
$449,619.90 



First Baptist Church, Dunn 
First Baptist Church, 

Greensboro 
First Baptist Church, 

Lumberton 
First Baptist Church, Nashville 
First Baptist Church, Raleigh 
Madison Baptist Church, 

W.M.S. 
Memorial Baptist Church, 

Greenville 
Pullen Memorial Baptist Churcl 

Circle No. 5, Raleigh 



BUSINESS 
FIRMS 

contributed 
$119,285.32 

Aetna Life Insurance Co. 
Adams-Terry Realty Co. 
Addressing Duplicating Service, 

Inc. 
A. T. Allen and Co. 
A. V. Anderson, Inc. 
James H. Anderson Co. 
A. B. Andrews and Co. 
Ape.x Cabinet Co. 
Arnold's Re.Nall Drugs 
Associated Insurers, Inc. 
Atlas Supply Co. 
B and B Cafe 
Baby Diaper Service 
Bagwell and Bagwell Insurance 
Bakers and Brown Roofing Co. 
Balcntinc's Restaurant 
Harold Barbee and Co. 
De Van Barbour and Son 
Barbour's Esso Service 
Bernhard's 
Bernson Rug Cleaning and 

Storage 



Bolton Air Conditioning and 

Heating Co. 
Boylan-Pearce, Inc. 
Branch Banking and Trust Co. 
Brittain's, Inc. 
Bryan-Cooper Oil Co., Inc. 
Burton's 
Bus Terminal Restaurants 

.Management Corp. 
Byrum Lumber Co. 
Cameron-Brown Co. 
Cameron Village, Inc. 
Canton Cafe 

Capital Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Capital Ice and Coal Co., Inc. 
Capital Lightning Protection Co. 
Capitol Bargain Store 
Capitol City Lumber Co. 
Carolina Apartment Hotel Co. 
Carolina Builders Corp, 
Carolina Power & Light Co. 
Carolina Securities Corp. 
Carpet Center 
Carter's, Inc. 
Cash Trading Co. 
Cavin's. Inc. 
City Ice and Fuel Co. 
Colonial Stores, Inc. 
Collier Cobb and Associates 
Commercial Printing Co. 
Commercial Standard Title 

Insurance Agency, Inc. 
Continental Baking Co. 
Cooper's Furniture House 
Daniel's 
F. W. Dellinger Plastering 

Contractor 
Delta Real Estate & Insurance 

Co., Inc. 
Dependable Refrigeration 

Service 
T. A. Dick Insurance Agency 
R. S. Dickson and Co., Inc. 
Dillard Paper Co. of Raleigh, 

Inc. 
Dillon Motor Finance Co. 
Di.xie Motor Parts Co., Inc. 
R. L. Dresser Flooring and 

.Acoustical Contractor 
Durham Life Insurance Co. 
Durham Music Co. of Raleigh 
Edwards & Broughton Co, 
Edwards Poultry Knoll 
Electric Motor & Transformer 

Co., Inc. 
Electrical Wholesalers, Inc. 
Ellisberg's, Inc. 
J. J. Fallon Co., Inc. 
.•\. I-'. Finley & Associates, Inc. 
First Federal Savings and Loan 
Fisher's Bakery & Sandwich Co. 
Food Equipment Contract Co. 
Goodman's Ladies Shop 



l.'i 



Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31. 1964. 



Green's Laundry & Cleaners 
Gulf Oil Corporation 
Haskins and Rice, Architects 
Hayes-Barton Pharmacy 
Heilig-Levine of Raleigh, Inc. 
James Heonis Co. 
Honeycutt Fruit & Produce Co. 
Howard-Green Electrical Co., 

Inc. 
Hudson-Belk Co. 
Hunt General Tire Co. 
Ideal Cleaners 
IBM Corp. 
Ivey's 

Jean's of Raleigh 
Charles E. Johnson and Son 
Johnson's Pharmacy 
W. H. King Drug Co. 
Land's, Inc. 
Lee Drug Store 
Lessie's, Inc. 
Lewis', Inc. 
The London Oil Co. 
McCracken Supply Co. 
McLeod, Watson and Lanier 
C. C. Mangum, Inc. 
Man-Mur Shoe Shop 
Walker Martin, Inc. 
Maus Piano Co. 
Medlin-Davis Cleaners 
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 

& Smith 
Mid-State Paper Box Co. 
Minit Markets 
Mitchell's Hair Styling, Inc. 
Modern Metal Products Co. 
A. B. Morgan Agency 
Motor Bearings & Parts Co., of 

Raleigh, Inc. 
Mutual Distributing Co. 
Nash-Steele-Warren, Inc. 
National Cash Register Co. 
National Film Service 
Nehi Bottling Co. 
News & Observer Publishing Co. 
Noland Co., Inc. 
North Carolina National Bank 
North Carolina Products Co. 
Nowell Clothing Co.. Inc. 
Occidental life Insurance Co. 
Offset Printing Co. 
William A. Pahl Co., Inc. 
Patterson Travel Service, Inc. 
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. 
Phillips Roofing Co. 
Pine State Creamery 
E. R. Poole Music Co. 
Raleigh Apartments, Inc. 
Raleigh Linen Service 
Raleigh Office Supply Co., Inc. 
Raleigh Savings & Loan Assn. 
Raleigh Tractor & Truck Co. 
Roval Tires Co. 



Sanders Motor Co. 
Sears, Roebuck, and Co. 
Serve-Self Food Market 

E. L. Scott Roofing Co. 
The Scottish Bank 
Shenandoah Life Ins. Co. 
Sir Walter Chevrolet Co. 
So-Rite Manufacturing and 

Supply 
Sperry & Hutchinson Co. 
Spic and Span Dry Cleaners 
Sportland, Inc. 
Stahl-Rider Distributing Co. 
Standard Concrete Products 

Co. 
State Beauty Shop 
State Capital Life Insurance Co. 
State Distributing Corp. 
Stephenson Music Co. 
Stockton, White and Co. 
R. B. Stokes Concrete 

Contractor 
Strickland's Grocery & Market 
Southern Desk Co. 
Thompson Cadillac-Oldsmobile, 

Inc. 
Thurston Motor Lines 
Tire Sales & Service 
United Restaurant Equipment 

Co. 
Varina Wholesale Building 

Supplies 
Wm. C. Vick Construction Co. 
WKIX Radio Station 
Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 
Wachovia Building Co. 
Wake Farmers Cooperative, Inc. 
Walgreen Drug Stores 
Fred Whitaker Co. 
R. S. Williams and Co. 
Williams, Urquhart, & Ficklin 
Winn-Dixie of Raleigh, Inc. 
John W. Winters and Co. 

F. W. Woolworth Co. 

Job P. Wyatt and Sons Co. 
Wyatt-Quarles Seed Co. 
Vancey Insurance Agency 
Yeargan & Tudor's Beauty Shop 




ESTATES, 
FOUNDATIONS, 
AND 
ORGANI- 
ZATIONS 
contributed 
$232,786.41 

J. Rufus Hunter Estate 
Elva Bryan Mclver Estate 
Mary Reynolds Babcock 

Foundation 
Cozart Foundation 
McCrary-Acme Foundation 
Rowena Adams McNairy 

Foundation 
Wayne Foundation, Inc. 
Raleigh Music Club 

FACULTY AND 
STAFF 

contributed 
$23,902.36 

Mrs. Helen W. Allen 

Hazel Baity 

Carolyn Barrington 

V. Howard Belcher 

Lila Bell 

Edwin Blanchard 

Dr. Sankey L. Blanton 

Ann Eliza Brewer 

Ellen D. Brewer 

Dr. P. F. Brookens 

Dr. Carlyle 'Campbell 

Dr. Ernest F. Canaday 

James L. Clyburn 

Dr. Bernard H. Cochran 

Mrs. Helen Jo Collins 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry E. Cooper 

Carolyn Covington 

Dr. Roger H. Crook 

Robert 'G. Deyton 

Mrs. Helen S. Duke 

Mrs. Mary M. Edwards 

Louise E. Fleming 

Dr. Lois Frazier 

Dr. Stisanne Freund 

Mrs. Phyllis W. Garriss 

Mrs. Ruth Gartner 



16 



Velma M. Gorsage 

Jane Greene 

Mrs. Dorothy P. Greenwood 

Mae Grimmer 

Isabelle Haeseler 

Mrs. Mary K. Hamilton 

Jennie .VI. Hanyen 

Dr. Julia H. Harris 

Mrs. Dru M. Hinsley 

Mrs. Harriet Holler 

Mrs. Bobbye M. Hunter 

Mrs. Edna Hurst 

Mrs. Margaret L. Johnson 

Dr. Mary Lynch Johnson 

Dr. Ira O. Jones 

Mary Bland Josey 

Dr. Alice B. Keith 

Dr. lone K. Knight 

Dr. Louise Lanham 

Lula M. Leake 

William R. Ledford 

Dr. Sarah Lemmon 

Dr. John .M. Lewis 

Mrs. Mary W. Liles 

Mrs. Mary S. McLeod 

Mrs. Vera T. Marsh 

Mrs. Geneva L. Martin 

Mrs. Margaret C. Morris 

Mrs. Jay D. Massey 

Mrs. Rose M. Melvin 

Mrs. Ellen G. Mimms 

Dr. Lucy Ann Neblett 

Mrs. Faye F. Orders 

Mrs. Maltie E. Parker 

Dr. Leishman A. Peacock 

Dr. Henri R. Pearcy 

Anna B. Peck 

Stuart Pratt 

Mrs. Dorothy K. Preston 

Dr. Helen Price 

Mrs. George B. Pruden 

Mrs. Lois S. Renfrow 

Dr. D. R. Reveley 

Mrs. Ruth B. Robinson 

Dr. Norma Rose 

Lucy H. Saunders 

Mrs. Ma Belle Smith 

Mrs. Ben W. Smith 

Mrs. Jeannette R. Smith 

Jean Swanson 

Dr. Leslie Syron 

Dr. Ethel Tillcy 

Bunyan Y. Tyner 

Dr. Lillian P. Wallace 

Mrs Martha J. Whilden 

Dr. John A. Yarbrough 

Dr. Mary E. Yarbrough 

Betty Jean Ycager 



FRIENDS 

contributed 
S128,348.02 



Mrs. C. L. Adams 

Mrs. Josephine W. Adams 

Rev. A. Douglas Aldrich 

D. N. Alexander 
Arch T. Allen 

J. Leroy Allen 
Lillian B. Allen 
O. O. Allsbrook 
R. Homer Andrews 
Anonymous 
Banks Arendell 
Mrs. J. M. Arnette 

E. W. Atkins 
J. S. Babb 
W. E. Bailey 

Rt. Rev. Richard H. Baker 

L. Y. Ballentine 

Mabel Ballentine 

Arthur L. Barnett 

Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Barrow 

Robert D. Beam 

William T. Beaty 

C. A. Beckwith 

Mrs. C. M. Billings 

Dr. Glenn F. Bitler 

W. Powell Bland 

Walter J. Bone 

Daniel C. Boncy, Jr. 

Branllev C. Booe 

David B. Bovies. Jr. 

R. J. Bradley 

Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Bradshaw 

Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Brady 

L O. Brady 

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Brady 

James P. Brassfield 

Lucy Brassfield 

John Bratton 

Mrs. Charles E. Brewer 

Frances ,\Lirion Brewer 

Talcott W. Brewer 

Dr. Earl W. Brian 

James T. Briley 

R. Howard Britten 

Robert W. Brooks 

Robert B. Broughton 

Arthur W. Brown 

I^r. C Lynn Brown 

Ma,\ Brown 

Wayne V. Brown 

Mrs. Jane C. Bruce 

L. G. Bullard 

John W. Burwell. Jr. 

Mrs. E. S. Byrd 

Or, Clifford C. Byrum 



James W. Byrum 

Mrs. Cornelia P. Campbell 

Dr. Leslie H. Campbell 

H. S. Capps 

J. Talbott Capps 

Dr. and Mrs. L. L. Carpenter 

Mrs. C. D. Carr 

Dr. and Mrs. H. R. Chamblee 

Godfrey Cheshire, Sr. 

Mrs. Joseph B. Cheshire, Jr. 

K. B. Clay 

Mrs. Bernard H. Cochran 

Jyles J. Coggins 

A. Bryan Combs 

Dr. Joseph J. Combs 

Dr. A. Derwin Cooper 

Dr. Robert L. Costner 

Mrs. Oran J. Cottle 

Charles R. Council 

R. Lee Covington 

Mrs. Gilbert Crabtree 

Dr. Thomas B. Dameron 

E. C. Daniel 
Mrs. W. B. Daniel 
Frank A. Daniels 

Mr. and Mrs. Cedric Davis 

Harry T. Davis 

John C. Davis 

Mrs. Paul Price Davis 

Roland B. Davis 

R. B. Davis, Jr. 

Thomas W. Davis 

F. W. Dellincer 
Willis A. Denmark 
Dr. William B. Dewar 
Mrs. C. P. Deylon 
Mrs. R. G. Deyton 
Daniel R. Di.xon 
I'roy A. Doby 

John R. Dossenbach 

Dr. John Dotterer 

Jack Doub 

Landon A. Doub 

Dr. William B. Dowell 

R. L. Dresser 

E. C. Duncan 

John N. Duncan 

N. A. Dunn 

John A. Edwards 

Thomas W. Elliott, Jr. 

W. G. Enloe 

Thad Eure 

Murphy Evans 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy C. Farmer 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Ferguson 

.•\. I. Ferrce 

Lucille D. Ferrell 

Mrs. W. C. Fields 

A. E. Finlcy 

Dr. Paul Fitzgerald, Jr. 

William M. Fleming 

Mrs. F. Vadcn Fonville 

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Foster 



17 



Donors from January 1, 1958 through January 31, 1964. 



Mrs. Furman Fowler 

James T. Franklin 

L. G. Frazier 

R. N. Freeman 

David T. Fuller 

Dr. Fleming Fuller 

Charles L. Fulton 

Charles W. Gaddy 

Mrs. Maraaret Boylan Gaddy 

Mrs. R. E. Gaddy. Jr. 

Robert E. Gaddy 

Frank J. Gallagher 

Rev. E. Nortleet Gardner 

J. C. Gardner 

John S. Gardner 

M, B. Garrett 

George P. Geoghcgan, Jr. 

Earl S. Gibson 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Gibson 

Sloan D. Gibson 

Dan W. Gift 

James B. Godwin 

C. M. Goethe 

Sarah Gougans 

Charles F. Gold 

Robert E. Gooding 

Alan W. Gordon 

J. Marse Grant 

Mrs. Charles S. Grayson 

Martin K. Green 

C. E. Greene 

D. L. Grice 
T. N. Grice 

D. L. Griffis 
Dr. Paul Gross 
H. H. Haines 

Dr. G. Fred Hale 
James C. Hamrick 

E. Meyer Hansen 
Dr. Adolph E. Harer 
J. Obie Harmon 

J. H. Harper, Sr. 

Dr. F. G. Harris 

Shearon Harris 

J. Quincy Hart 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Hartman 

B. A. Hartness 
Dr. R. E. Hartsell 
Marshall B. Hartsfield 

Dr. Hubert B. Haywood. Sr. 

C. C. Hazell 

F. H. Heidelberg 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Helms 

John I.. Henderson 

Montague H. Hicks 

Mrs. J. Henry Hisihsmith 

Mrs. Wilbur F. Hodge 

Luther H. Hodges 

C. F. Holland 

J. W. Hollis 

Mrs. Mary P. Holt 

Paul A. Hoover 

J. Y. Hornbuekle 



Mrs. W. B. Horton 

G. H. Houser 

Mrs. Clay I. Hudson 

Karl G. Hudson, Jr. 

Luther B. Hughes 

W. G. Humphrey 

J. R. Hunt, Sr. 

Rufus A. Hunter 

S. H. Husbands 

Dr. Herman Ihley 

D. Staton Inscoe 

Mrs. D. R. Jackson 

Russell M. Jefferson 

C. E. JefTcoat 

Dr. A. \L Jenkins 

Thomas W. Jenkins 

Earl Johnson 

Elbert N. Johnson 

Mrs. J. B. Johnson 

Mrs. Joseph M. Johnson 

Milton E. Johnson 

Richard Wl. Johnson 

Bertram A. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Coite H. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Jones 

Drewry L Jones 

Earle Jones 

Earl T. Jones 

H. G. Jones 

Jesse A. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Re,\ K. Jones 

Mrs. M. G. Joslin 

William Joslin 

Dr. George W. Joyner 

Mrs. Helen S. Kelly 

Paul Kelly 

Donald S. Kimrey 

Dr. John W. Kincheloe, Jr. 

Dr. Robert Kicklighter 

Mrs. L. E. King 

Joseph S. Kirchheimer 

Mrs. J. R. Kirby. Jr. 

Mrs. J. Sidney Kirk 

T. B. Knight 

B. F. Knott 
James A. Lassiter 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Lassitei- 

William C. Lassiter 

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Layfield 

Hubert F. Ledford 

Mrs. William Ledford 

John L Lee 

Robert L Lee 

C. C. Leggette 

Mrs. Kate P. Lipford 
George E. London 
George E. Lortz 
Roy L. Lovvorn 
Osborne S. Lucas 
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Lupo 
W. Paul Lyman 
Charles D. McFall 
Robert A. Mclntyre 



Harry D. McKinney 

William A. McKnight 

U. P. McLaurin 

O. W. McManus 

A. A. McMillan 

Mr. and Mrs. G. F. McMillani 

E. G. Macom. Jr. 

C. C. Mangum 

James H. Manley, Sr. 

Leroy Marks 

Lex Marsh 

Mr. and Mrs. V. A. Martin 

W. D. Martin 

Dr. W. J. Martin 

James W. Mason 

Johnson Matthews 

A. J. Ma.xwell, Jr. 

Alice Register Maynard 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Meares 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Medlin 

Jerome H. Melton 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Miles 

J. Everette Miller 

John Milner 

A. Lester Mims 

Theo. B. Mitchell 

Mrs. B. B. Montague 

A. H. Moore 

C. M. Moore 

Mrs. Dewitt T. Moore 

Mrs. G. Ernest Moore 

Mrs. William A. Moore 

Leonard L. Morgan 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Morris 

Dr. Robert R. Morrison, Jr. 

L. W. Morrissette 

Mrs. Margaret T. Morton 

Mrs. Harold Mott 

L. D. Murphy 

James S. Slewbold 

George H. Newsome 

Marvin F. D. Newton 

Mrs. A. W. Norris 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Norris 

Covert L. Norton 

Charles S. Norwood 

Mrs. C. S. Norwood 

John Norwood 

Rev. Gaylord B. Noyce 

Mrs. H. H. Ott 

Dr. Olin W. Owen 

John A. Park, Jr. 

Mrs. A. Leroy Parker 

Mrs. Frank Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Parker 

Dr. W. T. Parrott, Jr. 

Dr. George W. Paschal, Jr. 

HA. Paften 

Admiral A. M. Patterson 

O. F. Patterson 

E. B. Peabody 

Lucian A. Peacock 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Peal 



18 



Katheryn T. Peebles 
Vernon C. Peebles 
Egbert N. Peeler 
Nat D. Peirson 
Mrs. W. S. Penny 
M. Z. Perkinson 
Charles H. Pinner 
J. C. Pittman 
Mrs. Sadie W. Pizer 
Robert J. Pleasants 
Dr. Clarence Poe 
W. Curtis Poe 
W. Gordon Poole 
W. Roy Poole 
Robert E. Pomeranz 

C. E. Pope, Jr. 
E. N. Pope 
Edwin S. Pou 

Dr. Howard P. Powell 
James N. Poyner 
Dr. Rose Pulley 
W. Grayson Quarles 
W. R. Ramsey, Jr. 

D. A. Rawley 
M. E. Ray 
Fred W. Reebals 
J. E. Raid 

W. Alton Reid 

Ray V. Revels 

Mrs. Thomas B. Reynolds 

Mrs. Ruth E. Roberts 

Dr. Leon W. Robertson 

William B. Rodman 

Mrs. Anne Rogers 

P. B. Rogers 

Ben Rose 

Dr. Robert J. Ruark 

Tom Salmon 

E. C. Sanders 

Rev. B. Daniel Sapp 

Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Sewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Seymour 

M. A. Shaver 

Henry M. Shaw 

W. T. Shaw 

R. Elmo Shuffler 

F. H. Simmons 
S. L. Simmons 

Mrs. John M. Simms 

D. J. Sinclair, Jr. 

Mrs. D. J. Sinclair, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. L. Gordon Sinclair 

Ralph W. Slate 

W. B. Sloop 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lee Smith 

C. Kersey Smith 

Mrs. Fred J. Smith 

G. Dewey Smith 

Mrs. Kenneth Royslcr Smith 

Mrs. Thomas J. Smith 

Willis Smith. Jr. 
j Richard F. Snavcly 
I E. A. Solomon, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Spell 

John W. Spencer 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Spivey 

T. M. Stanback 

W. G. Stanford 

Mr. and Mrs. Neal M. Stanley 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Starke 

Homer C. Starling 

James E. Stathacos 

William W. Staton 

Jack Steele 

Rev. Charles E. Stevens 

Lessie Stewart 

R. B. Stokes 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Stone 

Mrs. Roy G. Stout 

Glenn F. Strole 

Dr. Charles W. Styron 

David B. Sutton 

Roy B. Talley 

Mrs. Cleo B. Tarlton 

Mrs. R. W. Tarleton 

William W. Taylor, Jr. 

Mrs. W. A. Thaxton 

Mrs. Bradley O. Thompson 

Dr. E. H. Thornhill 

Dr. George T. Thornhill, Jr. 

D. L. Todd 

Travis H. Tomlinson 

Hoyt W. Torras 

John E. Treadwell 

R. R. Trevathan 

Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Tucker 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Turner, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Clyde Turner 

Lewis Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. Sharp Turner 

Gary M. Underbill 

Rev. Ernest C. Upchurch 

T. A. Upchurch 

Henry E. Vail 

Leif Valand 

Mrs. Van Landingham 

Dr. W. R. Wagoner 

J. C. Walker 

J. E. Walker 

Harold B. Wall 

Dr. Rouer L Wall 

W. Fred Wallace 

Luther F. Yost 

J. Dennis Young 

Grace Yow 




MlSCKLLAiNKOUS 

FUNDS 

S587.3()3.76 



19 



Introducing 



. . . MC'l 

We, the Development Committee of Meredith College, in an effort 
to promote interest in the ever-expanding needs of the institution 
which we serve, and to encourage systematic giving to our college, 
hereby establish a club to be known as the MC-1 Club. Member- 
ship in this club will require an annual gift of $100 or more. 
Anyone giving $100 or more in any one year, regardless of how the 
money may be designated, will automatically become a member. 
It is the desire of this committee that the office of the Director of 
Public Relations onnually send out cords to the members requesting 
their annual donations and do any personal follow-up deemed 
advisable. 

Inasmuch as the purpose of this club is to encourage spontaneous 
and systematic giving to Meredith College, this committee recom- 
mends that the Board of Trustees or its Executive Committee be 
empowered to disperse undesignated funds as deemed advisable. 
We urgently request and encourage all of the trustees, the alumnoe, 
and the friends of the College to become members of the Club. 
On November 26, 1963, Charles B. Deone of Rockinghom, chairman 
of the Board of Trustees, entertained at a' "Carlyle Campbell 
Evening" banquet, at which time the trustees, alumnae in the area, 
and certain other friends of the College honored Dr. Carlyle 
Campbell in his 25th year as President of Meredith. On April 20, 
1964, a similar occasion, directed by Trustee Mrs. Leon W. Robert- 
son, will be held at Lloyd's Restaurant at Tarboro at 7:00 p.m. 
Meredith's needs, with particular reference to the proposed Carlyle 
Campbell Library, will be brought to the attention of those present. 




Hayden B. Hayes 

Chairman 

Development 

Committee of The 

Board of Trustees 



20 



TRUSTEES 

contributed 
189,426.69 

L. N. Bagnal 

Mrs. Walter J. Bone 

James N. Britt, Jr. 

Raymond A. Bryan 

Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn 

C. Cliff Cameron 

Mrs. Walter E. Clark 

C. T. Council 

Mrs. Egbert Davis, Jr. 

Charles B. Deane 

Dr. Elizabeth J. Dotterer 

J. Holt Evans 

Mrs. Foy J. Farmer 

Rev. W. W. Finlator 

Mrs. E. Norfleet Gardner 

Dr. Robert H. Gilbert 

Rev. Randolph L. Gregory 

Hayden B. Hayes 

Col. William T. Joyner 

J. M. Kesler 

Mrs. Leiand H. Kitchin 

Mrs. T. B. Knight 

Dr. W. W. leathers, Jr. 

C. Gordon Maddrey 
LeRoy B. Martin 
Walker Martin 

Dr. L. M. Massey 
Rev. C. O. Milford 
Mrs. Margaret C. Morris 
Mrs. Charles S. Norwood 
Dr. Carlton S. Prickett 
Edward L. Rankin 
Mrs. Leon W. Robertson 
John M. Simms 
Dr. Marvin L. Slate 
John A. Stevens 

D. J. Thurston, Jr. 
W. Harold Trentman 
Mrs. W. R. Wagoner 
Straughan H. Watkins 
Mrs. William M. Watts 
W. Herbert Weatherspoon 
W. Fred Williams 

Mrs. Harry D. Wood 



21 



Since January 1, 1958 . . . 




. u 




The Ellen Brewer Home Management 
House, a gift of Talcotf W. Brewer of 
Raleigh, was completed in 1959. 



Wings were added to the Mae 
Grimmer Alumnae House in 1963. 



Poteat Dormitory was completed in 1962. 





22 




Hunter Hall, the science building, 
mode passible by the will of Dr. 
J. Rufus Hunter of Raleigh, wos 
completed in 1959. 



The Delia Dixon Carroll Infirmory 
was completed in 1962. 



The EI»o Bryan Mcl»er Amphi- 
theater is nearing completion. 








n 



*\ , , We can properly feel joy in a 

record of achievement only as it 

encourages and invigorates us to 

push forward and onward. " 



CARLYLE CAMPBELL 





^•V-- ■ ^.; 








Series 57 



March, 1964 



No. 1 



Published quarterly by MEREDITH COLLEGE, 

at Raleigh, North Carolina 

Entered January 13, 1908, at Raleigh, N. C, as 

Second-Class Matter under Act of 

Congress July 16, 1894. 



ENTERED AS 

SECOND CLASS 

MATTER 




Meredith 

College 

Bulletin 



AVEREDITH COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 



April, 1964 




Announcements for 1964-1965 



Raleigh 



North Carolina 



MO.--.V. IQfid Nn 1 r 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

Please address inquiries as indicated below so as to insure prompt 
handling : 

Academic Records Registrar 

Admissions Dean of the College 

Alumnae Matters Alumnae Secretary 

Business Matters Business Manager and Treasurer 

Educational Programs Dean of the College 

Employment of Students Business Manager 

Expansion Program Office of Public Relations 

Expenses Business Manager and Treasurer 

General Information Office of President 

News Items News Bureau 

Scholarships and Student Aid President 

Self-Help Business Manager 

i?fj. Student Interests Dean of Students 

Student Recruitment Assistant, Public Relations 

Student Reports Registrar 

Summer School Dean of the College 

Transcripts Registrar 



-■-~/l 



1 






An index at the back of this book will help you to use this catalogue 
to a greater advantage. 

Visitors are always welcome on the Meredith campus. Write the 
Public Relations Oifice for information and for arranging tours of 
the campus. 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 

April, 1964 




Announcements for 1964-1965 



Raleigh North Carolina 



Published quarterly by Meredith College nt Rnlclgh, N. C. Entered January 13, 1908, 
at Raleigh, N. C. as second-class matter under act of Congress of July 16, 1S94. 

Series 57 APRIL. 19C4 No. t 



CONTENTS 

Communications with College Inside Front Cover 

College Calendar 6 

Recognition 6 

Purpose and Policy 6 

Board of Trustees 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Faculty 9 

Faculty and StafF Committees 18 

Officers of the Alumnae Association 14 

General Information 16 

Location 16 

Expenses 21 

Scholarships 23 

Student Loan Funds 34 

Summer Session 86 

Requirements for Admission 28 

Requirements for Degrees 31 

General Academic Regulations 31 

Courses of Instruction 42 

Degrees Conferred 82 

Register of Students 85 

Index 99 



(S) 



1964 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 26 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



MAY 



S M 



W T F S 



1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



SEPTEMBER 



S M 



W T F S 



12 3 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 11 13 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 26 26 

27 28 29 30 



FEBRUARY 



S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 



JUNE 



S M 



W T F S 



12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 



OCTOBER 



S M 



W T F S 



12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



MARCH 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



JULY 



5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 26 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 6 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



APRIL 

S M T W T F ? 

12 3 4 

6 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 26 

26 27 28 29 30 



AUGUST 



S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 T 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



S M 



DECEMBER 
T W t |i S 



12 3 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 

i 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 U 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

31 



1965 



MAY 



S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



S M 



W T F S 



12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 



FEBRUARY 



JUNE 



OCTOBER 



S M T W T F S 

i 2~~3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 



MARCH 
5 M T W T F T 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



APRIL 

S M T W T F T 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 



JULY 
S M T W T F ~S 
1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 IB 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30' 

31 

NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F T 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 



DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


1 2 3 

7 8 9 10 

14 15 16 17 

21 22 23 24 

28 29 30 31 


4 
11 
18 
25 



v?ii.,i--:..!ȣ:y 



June 


8 


Monday 




9 


Tuesday 




15-19 


Mon.-Fri. 


July 


17 


Friday 




18 


Saturday 

FIRST 


September 


9 


"Wednesday 




10-14 


Thurs.-Mon, 




12 


Saturday 




14 


Monday 




15 


Tuesday 




23 


Wednesday 




29 


Tuesday 


October 


29 


Thursday 


November 


9-11 


Mon.-Wed. 




13 


Friday 




25 


Wednesday 




30 


Monday 


December 


13 


Sunday 




19 


Saturday 


January 


4 


Monday 




16 


Saturday 




18-23 


Mon.-Sat. 




23 


Saturday 
SECOND 


January 


27 


Wednesday 




28 


Thursday 


February 


8 


IVfonday 




8-12 


Mon.-Fri. 




20 


Saturday 




23 


Tuesday 


March 


18-19 


Thurs.-Fri. 




23 


Tuesday 




25-27 


Thurs.-Sat. 


April 


15 


Thursday 




21 


Wednesday 


May 


1 


Saturday 




21 


Friday 




22-28 


Snt.-Fri. 




29-31 


Sat.-Mon. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

SUMMER SESSION, 1964-1965 

Registration, 2 :00 p.m. 
Beginning of classes, 7 :45 a.m. 
School of Christian Studies 
Examinationa 
Commencement Exercises 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1964-1965 

Arrival of all new students 

Orientation program for all new students 

Eegistration of freshmen and transfer 

students 
Registration of returning students 
Beginning of classes, 8 :25 aan. 
Last day for class-schedule changes 
Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
Founders' Day 

Examinations on "block" courses 
Mid-semester reports 
Beginning of Thanksgiving recess, 

1:00 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8:25 a.m. 
Program of Christmas music 
Beginning of Christmas recess, 12 :30 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
Reading Day 

First-semester examinations 
Commencement exercises 

SEMESTER, 1964-1965 

Registration for second semester 

Beginning of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 

Last day for class-schedule changes 

Religious Emphasis Week 

Last day to file applications for degrees 

in June, 3965 
Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
Sophomore Testing Program 
Mid-semester reports due 
Examinations in "block" courses 
Beginning of spring recess, 1 :00 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 8 :25 a.m. 
May Day 
Reading Day 

Spcond-semester examinations 
Commencement exercises 



Tarpose and Policy 



"The purpose of Meredith College is to develop Lq its students 
the Christian attitude toward the whole of life, and to prepare 
them for intelligent citizenship, home-making, graduate study, and 
for professional and other fields of service. Its intention is to provide 
not only thorough instruction, but also culture made perfect through 
the religion of Jesus Christ. These ideals of academic integrity and 
religious influence have always been cherished at Meredith." 

". . . that Meredith College, a liberal arts college for women, 
should continue to emphasize and develop its academic program 
in terms of scholastic standards and service, giving appropriate 
attention to requirements for the admission and retention of students, 
the formulation and administration of its curriculum, and the main- 
tenance of procedures implicit in an educational institution of high 
quality ; 

"and that, as a Christian college, Meredith should be primarily 
concerned to inculcate attitudes, provide activities, and promote learning 
calculated to deepen and broaden the Christian experience of its 
students and to prepare them for maximum service in the Christian 
enterprise." 

— from Purpose and Policy, as re- 
stated by Board of Trustees, 1954 



Recognition 



Meredith Collie is a member of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools aiid the Association of American Colleges. 
Graduates of Meredith are eligible for membership in the American. 
Association of University Women. Meredith College is a liberal arts 
member of the National Association of Schools of Music. 



(6) 



ORGANIZATION 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Charles B. Deane Chairman 

Howard K. Boozer Y ice-Chairman 

Maude D. Bunn Secretary 

David G. Olmsted Treasurer 

Terms Expire 196 Jt 

Maude D. Bunn Raleigh 

Elizabeth J. Dotterer Sanford 

Paul Early Greensboro 

Hatcher S. Elliott Charlotte 

Hayden B. Hayes Hickory 

Ernest P. Russell Concord 

Straughan H. "Watkins Henderson 

Terms Expire 1965 

Hubert M. Craig Lincolnton 

Charles B. Deane Rockingham 

lone K. Knight Madison 

Bland B. Pruitt Louisburg 

E. L. Rankin, Jr Raleigh 

Virginia L. Robertson Rocky Mount 

Virginia L. "Wood Leaksville 

Terms Expire 1966 

Howard R. Boozer Raleigh 

Warren Carr Durham 

Bunah L. Clark Asheville 

Eleanor L. Davis Winston-Salem 

Roberts Lasater Charlotte 

John A. Stevens Wilmington 

W. H. Trentman Raleigh 

Terms Expire 1967 

Hugh G. Ashcraft Charlotte 

W. J. Broadwell Durham 

Christine B. Farrior Williamston 

John M. Lewis Raleigh 

Thomas L. Rich, Jr. Fairmont 

Charles R. Tucker Gary 

Wm. H. Westphal Greensboro 

Executive Commitlee 
E. L. Rankin, Jr., Chairman Elizabeth J. Dotterer 

Howard R. Boozer, Vice-Chairman John M. Lewis 
W. J. Broadwell W. H. Trentman 

Maude T. Bunn Charles R. Tucker 

Warren Carr Straughan H. Watkins 

Wm. H. Westphal 

(7) 



8 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

ADMINISTRATION 

President Carlyle Campbell, AM., LL.D. 

Director of Public Relations Sankey L. Blanton, DJ), 

Dean Leishman A. Peacock, PhJ). 

Business Manager and Treasurer David G. Olmsted, B.S., C.PA.. 

Dean of Students Louise E. Fleming, A.M. 

Library Librarian Hazel Baity, A.B. in L.S. 

Asst. Librarian Jane Greene, A.B. in L.S., A.M. 

Assistant Virginia B. Pruden, A.B. 

Assistant Dorothy F. McCombs, A.B. 

Records Registrar Vera Tart Marsh 

Student Personnel Asst. Dean of Students Lula M. Leake, M.R.E. 

Asst. Dean of Students MaBelle Smith 

Asst. Dean of Students 

Judy G. McLamb, A.B., B.D. 
Religious Activities Director R. A. L. Walker, B.D. 

Health Service Physician William J. Senter, B.S., M.D. 

Nurse Edna Hurst, R.N. 

Nurse Lucy H. Saunders, R.N. 

Alumnae Association Executive Secretary Mae Grimmer, A.B. 

Public Relations Assistant Mary Bland Josey, A.B. 

News Bureau Director Agnes Cooper, A.B. 

Dining Hall Dietitian Bobby e Hunter 

Assistant Harriet Holler 

Hostess Frances E. Thome 

Dormitories Acting House Director Martha J. Whilder^ 

Asst. House Director Lucille Dandridge 

Buildings & Groimds Superintendent Harry Simmons 

Equitation Director Mary M. Edwards 

Supply Store Manager Dru M. Hinsley, A.B. 

Secretarial Staff Secretary to the President Lois S. Renfrow 

Secretary to the Director of Public Relations 

Carolyn Covington, A.B. 

Secretary to the Dean Mary K. Hamilton 

Secretary to the Dean Martha C. W ooldridge 

Secretary to the Registrar Anne W. Bilisoly 

Bookkeeper Gwen Davis, A.B. 

Secretary to the Business Manager 

Virginia Scarhoro 

Secretary, Business Office Margaret L. Johnson 

Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Betty Je-an Y eager, A.B. 

Secretary, Alumnae Office Evelyn R, Posey 



ORGANIZATION 9 

FACULTYi 

CABLYLB CAMPBETLL (1939), A.M., LL.D. PreHdent 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University; LL.D., University of South Carolina, Wake Forest 
College 

LEISHMAN A. PEACOCK (1948), PH.D. Dean 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University ; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

ERNEST F. CANADAY (1920), PH.D. Professor of MathemaHos 

A.B, William Jevcell College; A.M., University of Missouri; Ph.D., 
Duke University 

ELLEN DOZIER BREWER (1919), A.M. Professor of Home EconomicB 
A.B., Meredith College; B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

HARRY E. COOPER (1937), MUS.D., F.A.G.O. Professor of MuHo 

A.B., Ottawa University ; Mus.B., Horner Institute of Fine Arts ; 
Mus.D., Bush Conservatory; Fellow, American Guild of Organists; 
Guy Weitz, London 

MARY YARBROUGH (1928), PH.D. Professor of Chemistry and Physlca 
A.B., Meredith College; M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 
Duke University 

JOHN A. YARBROUGH (1943). PH.D. Professor of Biology 

A.B., Oklahoma Baptist University ; M.S., University of Oklahoma ; 
Ph.D., State University of Iowa; Graduate Student, Northwestern 
University 

QUBNTIN OLIVER McALLISTER (1944), PH.D. 

Professor of Foreign Language* 
A.B., A.M., Washington and Jefferson College; Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh 

RALPH E. McLAIN (1945), PH.D. Professor of Religion 

A.H., Muskingum College; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary ; Graduate Student, Columbia University, University of 
Chicago 

MARY LYNCH JOHNSON (1918), PH.D., L.H.D. Professor of English 
A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., Cornell 
University ; L.H.D. , Wake Forest College 

BTUART PRATT (1942), MUS.M. Professor of Musio 

A.B., Han wick College; Mus.B., Philadelphia Musical Academy; 
Mua.M., Syracuse University ; Two years In Berlin ; Marta Slebold, 
Hugo Kaun, Walter Scharwenka, Egon Petri 



' The data after a name Indicates the first jrear of ■ervlce at Meredith Collece. 



10 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

DAVID R. REVELET (1955), PH.D. Processor of Education 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

LESLIE W. STRON (1945), PH.D Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Mary Baldwin College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina 

NORMA ROSE (1937), PH.D. Professor of English 

A.B., Mereditli College ; A.M., University of North Carolina ; Ph.D., 
Yale University 

ROGER H. CROOK (1949), TH.D. Professor of Religion 

A.B., Wake Forest College; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary ; Graduate Student, Duke University 

ETHEL TILLET (1951), PH.D. Professor of Psychology and Philosophy 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

LOIS FBAZIEB (1954), ED.D. Professor of Business and EconomiC» 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.S., 
University of North Carolina ; Ed.D., Indiana University 

SABAH McCULLOH LEMMON (1947), PH.D. Professor of History 

B.S., Madison College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina 

JENNIE M. HANYEN (1931), A.M. Associate Professor of Eome Economics 
B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

BEATRICE DONLEY (1942), B.M. Associate Professor of Music 

B.M. (Voice), B.M. (Public School Music), West Virginia University; 
Voice with Horatio Connell, Juilliard School of Music ; Voice with 
Adelaide Gescheidt, New York 

HARRY K. DORSETT (1941), A.M. Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., Wake Forest College ; A.M., Columbia University ; Graduate 
Student, George Peabody CoUege for Teachers 

8USANNE H. FRBUND (1947), PH.D. 

Associate Professor of Foreign Languapeg 
Ablturlum, Berlin; Ph.D., University of Heidelberg 

lONB KEMP KNIGHT (1956), PH.D. Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Meredith College ; A.M., University of Pennsylvania ; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina 

LILA BELL (1941), M.ED. Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina : M.Ed., 
Duke University ; Graduate Student, Columbia University, University 
of North Carolina 



ORGANIZATION U 

HEI.^)N JO COLLINS (1944), M.S. AsHstant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Colorado State Agricultural College; M.S., Iowa State College 

EDWIN K. BLANCH ARD (1952), M.MUS.LIT. AsHstant Professor of Musio 
B.Mus., M.Mus., Eastman School of Music 

JAT D. MASSEY (1957), A.M. Assistant Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 
B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; A.M., 
New York University 

JAMES H. EADS. JR. (1958), M.S. Assistant Professor of Bioloov 

A.B., University of Kansas ; M.S., University of Alabama ; Graduate 
Student, University of Alabama 

PHYLLIS W. GARRISS (1951). M.MUS. Assistant Professor of Musio 

A.B., B.M., Hastings College; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music 

BERNARD H. COCHRAN (1960), PH.D. Assistant Professor of Religion 
A.B., Stetson University; B.D., Th.M., Southeastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary ; Ph.D., Duke University 

LUCY B. JEFFRIES (1960), M.F.A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.F.A., Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina 

ARTHUR C. DOWNS, JR. (1961), ED.D. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Philadelphia Mustum College of Art; A.M., Ed.D., Columbia 
University 

MAMIE HAFNER (1953), A.M. Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., University of Alabama; A.M., University of North Carolina; 
Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin 

ELEANOR KRUMMEL (1962), A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., A.M., Duke University; B.S. in Music, Institute of Musical Art; 
Graduate Student, University of North Carolina, University of 
Poitiers 

PRESTON I>. l'ARS<JNS (19*52), A.B., B.D. Assistant Professor of Soeiology 
A.B.. Atlantic Christian College; B.D., Vnnderbllt University; 
Graduate Student, University of North Carolina 

FRANK L. (JRUBBS (1963), PH.D Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., I^ynchburg College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

JAMES L. CLYBURN (19.-)fi), MS. Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., Elon College; M.S., Juilllard School of Music 



12 MEREDITH COLiLBGB 

RICHARD D. GOFP (1961), PH.D. Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Duke University ; A.M., ComeU University ; Pti.D., Duke 
University 

HELENA W. ALLEN (1952), M.Ed. Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

HUTH B. ROBINSON (1953), M.Ed. Instructor in Busineis 

B.S'., Oregon State College; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University 
of North Carolina 

VELMA MAE GORSAGE (1956), A.M. Instructor in English 

B.F.A., lULnois Wesleyan University ; A.M., University of Arkansas 

ISABELLE HAESELER (1956), M.S.M. Instructor in Musio 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S.M., Union Theological Seminary; 
Graduate Student, Colorado Seminary, University of North Carolina 

WILLIAM R. LEDFORD (1957), A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languages 
A.B., Berea College ; A.M., State University of Iowa ; Graduate 
Student, Middlebury College, University of North Carolina 

DOROTHY P. GREENWOOD (1959), A.M. Instructor in English 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; A.M., Tulane University; 
Graduate Student, Columbia University 

DOROTHY K. PRESTON (1961), A.M. Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University 

P. A. CLINE, JR. (1962), A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languaget 

A.B., Wake Forest College; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary ; A.M., University of North Carolina 

J. HENRY COFFER, JR., (1962), TH.M. Instructor in Religion 

A.B., Mercer University ; B.D., Yale University ; Th.M., Southeastern 
Theological Seminary; Graduate Student, Duke University 

VIRGINIA J. HOOD (19G2), M.ED. 

Instructor in Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Michigan State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina 

THOMAS C. PARRAMORE (1962), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina; Graduate Student, 
University of North Carolina 

EVELYN P. SIMMONS (1962), M.S. Instructor in Economiot 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women; M.S., University of Tennes- 
see; Graduate Student, University of Florida 

CAROLYN HARRINGTON (1963), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Duke University 

VERGEAN R. BIRKIN (1963), A.M. Instructor in Geography 

A.B., A.M., University of Colorado 

SHARON E. DUNCAN (1963), A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languages 

A.B., A.M., Michigan State University 

STEPHEN E. YOUNG (1963), S.M.M. Instructor in Music 

A.B., Stanford University; S.M.M., Union Theological Seminary 



ORGANIZATION 18 



PART-TIME MEMBERS OF FACULTY 

GENEVA MARTIN (1957), A.B. Mathematics 

A.B., Western Kentucky Teachers College 

ELIZABETH S. CHAMBERLAIN (1961), A.M. EnglUh 

A.B., Wellesley College; A.M., University of Michigan 

HELEN P. KELMAN (1961) A.M. Biology 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; A.M., 
University of North Carolina 

FRANCES W. STEVENS (1961), A.M. Physical Education 

A.B., Mary Washington College; A.M., New York University 

ROBERT G. FRACKER (1962), M.S. Education 

B.S., East Tennessee State College ; M.S., Appalachian State Teachers 
College; Graduate Student, Duke University 

ANNE HILL (1963), M.SC. Art 

B.F.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; 
M.Sc., Columbia University 



FACULTY AND STAFF COMMITTEES, 1963-64 

Administrative Council — ^Heada of academic departments: Mr. Camp- 
bell, Mr. Peacock, Miss Baity, Miss Fleming, Mrs. Marsh 

Admissions — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Crook, Miss Fleming, Miss Johnson, 
Misa Josey 

Auditorium — Miss Fleming, Miss Gorsage, Mrs. Massey, Mr. Olmsted, 
Mr. Pratt 

Budget — Mr. McAllister, Miss Baity, Mr. Canaday, Miss Frazier, Mr. 
McLain, Mr. Olmsted, Mr. Peacock 

Concerts, Lectures — Miss Lemmon, Mr. Clyburn, Mr. Crook, Mr. Downs, 
Mrs. Freund, Miss Tilley 

Curriculum — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Cooper, Miss Johnson, Miss Lemmon, 
Mr. Reveley, Miss Syron, Mr. Yarbrough 

Instruction — Miss Rose, Miss Bell, Mr. Crook, Mrs. Freund, Miss 
Haeseler, Mrs. Preston, Miss Yarbrough 

Library — Miss Baity, Mr. Eads, Mr. Fracker, Mrs. Garriss, Mr. Goff, 
Mrs. Greenwood, Mr. Ledford 

Orientation — Mr. Coffer, Mrs. Allen, Mrs. Collins, Miss Donley, Mr. 
Dorsett, Miss Knight, Miss Leake 



14 MEBEDITH COLLEGE 

Scholarships — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Cline, Mr. Cooper, Miss Flemuig, 
Mr. McLain, Miss Rose, Mr. Yarbrough 

Social Functions — Miss Fleming, Miss Brewer, Miss Grimmer, Miss 
Hanyen, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Marsh, Mrs. Simmons,, Mrs. Wliilden. 

Student Government — Miss Fleming, Miss Bell, Mr. Cochran, Mr. Goff, 
Mr. Peacock, Mrs. Preston, Miss Syron, Miss Yarbrough 

Student Health — Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Hood, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Hurst, 
Mr. Olmsted, Mrs. Whilden 

Vocational Information — Mr. Walker, Mr. Blanchard, Miss Brewer, 
Mr. Dorsett, Miss Hafner, Mrs. Jeffries, Mr. Parramore 



OFFICERS OF THE MEREDITH COLLEGE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 1963-1964 

Mrs. Charles S. Sullivan, Durham President 

Mrs. J. E. Overby, Smithfield Past President 

Mrs. I. L. Clayton, Ealeigh Vice-President 

Mrs. Louis P. K'ipper, AshevUle Vice-President 

(Asheville Division) 

Mrs. Calvin Ussery, Columbia, S. C. Vice-President 

(Charlotte Division) 

Mrs. Robert E. Fleming, Jr., Rocky Mount Vice-President 

(Elizabeth City Division) 

Mrs. Wm. M. Watts, Asheboro Vice-President 

(Greensboro Division) 

Mrs. Donald H. Humphrey, Shannon Vice-President 

(Wilmington Division) 

Mrs. Wm. H. Simpson, Raleigh Recording Secretary 

Miss Mae Grimmer, Raleigh Executive Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. John W. Franklin, Durham | , , . r 

y Alumnae-at- Large 

Miss Lena Mae Williams, Chapel Hill j 

Dr. Patricia S. Mitchell, Chapel Hill Commencement Speaker 



GENERAL lOTORiWATlON 



Meredith College, founded by the North Carolina Baptist Con- 
vention, was granted a charter in 1891, and was first opened to 
students in September, 1899. It was chartered as the Baptist Female 
University, a name changed in 1905 to the Baptist University for 
"Women, and in 1909 to Meredith College. This last name was 
given in honor of Thomas Meredith, for many years a recognized 
leader of the Baptist denomination in North Carolina, who in 1838 
presented to the Baptist State Convention a resolution urging the 
establishment in or near Raleigh of "a female seminary of high order 
that should be modeled and conducted on strictly religious principles, 
but that should be, so far as possible, free from sectarian influencea." 

The institution has had four presidents : James Carter Blasingame, 
1899-1900; Richard Tilman Vann, 1900-1915; Charles Edward Brewer, 
1915-1939; Carlyle Campbell, 1939—. 



LOCATION 

Meredith College, with a campus of 170 acres, is located in the 
capital city of North Carolina. This area, the educational center of 
the state, provides many religious, social, and educational advantages. 
The campus may be found on U. S. Route 1 in the Western part of 
the city. 



BUILDINGS 

The administration building, four dormitories, and the dining 
hall — all brick fireproof structures — form a quadrangle around a court. 
Johnson Hall contains on the first floor administrative offices and 
reception rooms; on the second floor the library and rooms for the 
use of non-resident students; and on the third floor an assembly room 
for the two literary societies. Tlie dormitories — Brewer Hall, Faircloth 
Hall, Vann Hall, and Stringfield Hall — accommodate from 140 to 
170 students in each building. The rooms in the dormitories, planned 
for two students each, are arranged in suites of two with a connecting 
bath. Each occupant bus a single bed and a closet of her own. 
There is a social room on each floor. A kitchenette, a pressing room 
and a launderette are available in each dormitory. 

On the east side of the campus, adjoining the quadrangle, 
Poteat Ilall, the senior dormitory, was completed for use in 19G2. 
Jones Hall, the auditorium and music building was completed for use 
in 1950. The two-story building contains a large auditorium, a lobby, 

(16) 



16 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

a: reception room, and facilities for the Department of Music; 
studios, offices and classrooms, a small assembly hall, practice rooms, 
a music library, a listening room, a recording studio, an iustrument 
storage room, and provision for organ pumps and equipment. Storage 
space and a set-construction sbop under the main stage are provided 
for college dramatic productions. 

"West of Yarn Hall is Joyner Hall, a modem classroom building 
of two floors opened in 1956. Included in tbe building are classroomfi 
for non-scientific subjects, offices for faculty, a small auditorium 
equipped witb visual aids, soimd-proof recording booths for languages 
classes, art studios and a small art gallery, seminar rooms, a lounge 
and a kitchenette. 

Hunter Hall, the new science building, is on the west side of the 
campus, located north of Joyner Hall. Here are classrooms and 
laboratories for biology, business, chemistry, economics, home eco- 
nomics, mathematics and physics. Adequate space is provided for 
offices and research laboratories for faculty, ai science library, a 
photographic darkroom, and a reception room. A greenhouse is used 
by the Department of Biology for botany classes. 

Northwest of Hunter Hall is the EUen Brewer House which 
provides an opportunity for seniors in the Home Economics Depart- 
ment in small, rotating groups, under the guidance of an instructor, 
to gain actual experience in home management. Erected in 1959, 
it offers all the modern facilities of a homelike, convenient residence, 
including, in addition to the four bedrooms and baths, a study for 
student use, an office for the supervisor, a living room, a dining room, 
a family room and a kitchen. 

East of the dormitories are the physical education building, the 
campus store, and the poat office. 

The Elva Bryan Mclver Amphitheater, with a: seating capacity 
of 1,200, was completed in the spring of 1964. Located in an oak 
grove to the south of Jones Hall, it overlooks a four and a half acre 
lake. An island stage separated from the amphitheater by a moat is 
complete with lighting and sound systems, and is ideally situated for 
outdoor performances and general college programs. 

LIBRARY 

The library, located on the second and third floors of Johnson Hall, 
offers facilities for study, supplementary and recreational reading, 
and reference work. It contains approximately 46,000 volumes and 
a large number of pamphlets. The books are carefully selected by the 
librarian and the heads of departments to meet the needs of the 
students. The periodical room is supplied with the leading literary, 
scientific, and educational magazines, and state and national news- 
papers. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

As a distinctly Christian college, Meredith makes every effort 
to encourage the spiritual growth of its students. A Director of 
Religious Activities gives guidance and counsel to students in their 
organized work and in their individual problems. Each year, in 
February, a visiting speaker is invited to the campus to lead students 
in a series of services looking toward deeper spiritual thinking and 
experience. 

All regular students are required to attend the chapel services 
five days each week. All students are also encouraged to attend 
Sunday school and church services each Sunday morning at churches 
in the city. 

HEALTH 

The Delia Dixon Carroll Infirmary, well-equipped and air- 
conditioned, under the direction of two graduate nurses and the College 
physician is maintained for the care of the sick and for the teaching 
of good health habits. Three daily office hours are observed by the 
nurses and emergencies are cared for at any hour. The College physician 
has designated office hours at the College at which time students may 
see him. It is the purpose of the physician and nurses to prevent 
illness by means of the knowledge and observance of the general laws 
of health. Health ratings based on a positive health program are 
recorded annually. 

A student health blank furnished by the College, following ac- 
ceptance of the student, must be completed and mailed directly to the 
Dean, Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. All necessary ocular and dental 
work should be attended to before students enter or during vacations. In 
emergencies this work may bo done by specialists in Raleigh without 
loss of time from classes. These appointments as well as those with 
other physicians and dentists must be made through the College in- 
firmary. 

RESIDENCE 

Students not living at their own homes or with near relatives 
are required to live in the College dormitories. Stringficld Hall and 
a section of Vann Hall are reserved for freshmen. 

Students should bring with them towels, sheets, pillows, pillow- 
cases, bedspreads, and all other bed coverings likely to be needed. 
All rooms are furnished with single beds. Curtains, draperies, rugs, 
and pictures will make the room more attractive. 

All laundry must be clearly marked with name tape. The laundry 
fee collected by the College covers the cost of flat work only. Each 
student may have laundered each week two sheets, two pillowcases, 
one bedspread, four towels, and one bureau scarf. 

All dorniitorics will be closed during the Christmas and Spring 
holidays. 



18 MEREDITH COLLEGE 



STUDENT OEGANIZATIONS 



Student Government Association. "Each student in coming to 
Meredith College accepts college citizenship involving self-government 
under the honor code." On this concept, so defined in Article III, 
Section 2, of the constitution of the Student Government Association, 
all campus government is based. All Meredith students are thereby 
members of the Student Government Association, the chief purpose 
of which is the promotion of a high sense of honor as the basis of all 
student government policy. Through the effective functioning of the 
honor code, the Association seeks to regulate the life of the students 
for the good of all concerned. The leadership of the Association is 
composed of three elected groups : the Legislative, Judicial, and Student 
Activity Boards. The Student Government Council, composed of the 
Student Government president and representatives from each board, 
serves as the Executive Committee of the Association. A Faculty 
Committee on Student Government confers with these boards on major 
matters of discipline and policy. The Student Government Association 
holds regular meetings at the chapel period each Thursday, at which 
time the students have an opportunity to discuss matters of special 
interest to them. 

Religious Organizations. The religious activities of the students 
are under the general direction of the Meredith Christian Association, 
its council including the officers of the Baptist Student Union, other 
auxiliary organizations and a representative of students belonging to 
other churches than a Baptist church. Vespers and Family Altar 
provide worship opportunities on the campus. Study groups are held 
throughout the year for helpful thinking and working together. 
Missionary opportunities are provided by the Young Woman's Auxiliary. 
Enjoyable parties, to which students from the neighboring colleges are 
sometimes invited, are also included in the pi'ograms of the Association. 
One week each year is set aside as Religious Focus Week, at which 
time Christian leaders from outside the college community are invited 
to direct student thinking in all areas of life. The character and 
number of religious activities fostered on the Meredith campus are 
evidence of the Christian purposefulness of Meredith students. 

Honor Society. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor Society, organized 
in 1923, has as its special aim the promotion of scholarship at Meredith. 
Members are admitted on the basis of scholastic standing maintained 
over a period of two years or more. Each year Kappa Nu Sigma 
presents some distinguished speaker, who is heard by the entire college 
community. 

Departmental Clubs. A means of cultural enrichment is offered 
students in the various departmental clubs at Meredith. These are 
the International Relations Club and the Meredith League of Women 
Voters, the Elizabeth Avery Colton English Club, the Creative Writing 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 

Club, the Barber Science Club, the Art Club, the French Club, the 
German Club, La Tertulia Spanish Club, the Canaday Mathematics 
Club, the Home Economics Club, the Sociology Club, the Tyner Future 
Teachers Club, the Granddaughters' Club, the Hoof Print Club, the 
Monogram Club, the Price Latin Club, the Freeman Religion Club, 
Psi Chi (Psychology) and Tomorrow's Business Women. Most of 
these hold monthly meetings and aim at an approach to their subjects 
somewhat different from the distinctly academic. 

Literary Societies. Two societies, the Astrotekton and the Philare- 
tian, have been in existence since the early days of the College. In 
addition to the presentation of programs at regular meetings, each 
society offers a medal for the best essay written by one of its members 
during the academic year. 

The Silver Shield. Selection for membership in the Silver Shield, 
honorary leadership society of the College, is based upon Christian 
character, constructive leadership, and service to the College. Members 
are chosen from the senior and jimior classes at a public "tapping" 
ceremony. The Silver Shield was organized in 1035. 

Puhlicaiions. There are three student publications at Meredith : 
The Twig, a newspaper, issued bi-weekly, in the columns of which 
College happenings are recorded and student opinion expressed ; The 
Acorn, a literary journal published four times during the College year; 
and Oak Leaves, the College yearbook. 

The Chorus. The Meredith Chorus, directed by a member of the 
music faculty, appears in concert at stated intervals throughout the 
College year. 

Sigma Alpha Iota. Music majors and candidates for the Bachelor 
of Music degree who meet the scholastic requirements and have the 
approval of the music faculty are eligible for membership in Sigma 
Alpha Iota. This national music fraternity for women encourages 
students by both awards and scholarships. 

The Phi Kappa Chapter of Sigma Pi Alpha was organized at 
Meredith in 1941. Sigma Pi Alpha is a national honorary modern 
language fraternity which seeks to recognize outstanding achievement 
in modern languages and to encourage active interest in the culture 
of the nations in which such languages are spoken. Students of Spanish, 
French, and German are selected on the basis of achievement and 
interest. 

The Meredith Playhouse. The Meredith Playhouse provides for 
students who are interested in dramatics both the opportunity to 
appear in plays and practical experience in play production. Several 
plays are prct^entcd during the winter. .\ chapter of .\lplia Psi Ornega, 



20 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

national lionoraiy dramatic fraternity, gives special recognition to 
members of The Meredith Playhouse who excel in its activities. 

The Athletic Association. The Athletic Association cooperates 
with the Department of Health and Physical Education in planning 
a wide range of recreational activities. Archery, badminton, basketball, 
bowling, equitation, field hockey, golf, Softball, volleyball, and tennis 
are among the activities offered. 

The four classes compete in the presentation of an original dra- 
matic production on Stimt Night. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 

EXPENSES 

GENERAL FEES FOR THE YEAR 

Resident Students 

Tuition : iustruction, library, lectures and recitals, 

academic administration $710.00 

Residence : room and board, laundry, infirmary service, 

maintenance — 640.00 

$1,350.00 
Non-resident Students 
Tuition (as above) $710.00 

SPECIAL FEES FOR EACH SEMESTER 

Applied Music (two half-hour lessons a -week): 

Regular Students $50.00 or $60.00 

Part-Time Students and Special Students . — - 100.00 

Use of practice room, with piano, one hour daily 9.00 

For each additional hour 6.00 

Use of organ, one hour daily 30.00 to 60.00 

Use of practice room, without piano, one hour daily 5.00 

For each additional hour 4.00 

Course fee, for special and part-time students, for each credit hour 22.00 

Education 495, 496 35.00 

Golf 5.00 

Home Economics 493 or 493S 40.00 

Horseback Riding (two hours a week) 45.00 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Graduation fee, including diploma $10.00 

Gymnasium co.stume (approximate cost) 12.00 

Late registration 2.00 

Special e.xamination 2.00 

Transcript of academic record (after first copy) 1.00 

X-ray in Infirmary 10.00 

Fluoroscope irt Infirmary 5.00 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 
For resident students: 

A fee of $25.00 must accompany each application of a new 
student. This fee will be credited on the account of those applicants 
who enter. A $15.00 refund will be made if the request is received by 
April 1. 

The registration fee of $25.00 for a student now in college 
who wishes to reserve a room for next session must be paid before 
March 1. This fee will be credited on the account of those students 
who re-enter. The fee will be refunded if the request is received by 
June 15. 

The balance is payable as follows : 

For new students, on or before April 1; old students 
on or bf'fore June 15, for the ensuing session (not 

refundable) $ 50.00 

At the beginning of the First Semester 300.00 



22 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

On November 4 the balance of tbe amount for tbe 
first semester 

At tbe beginning of tbe Second Semester $375.00 

On March 23 the balance of the amount for the second 
semester 

For non-resident sftidents: 

At the beginning of each semester $200.00 

On November 4 tbe balance of the amoimt for the first 
semester will be due. On March 23 tbe balance for the 
Becond semester will be due. 

The preceding statements as to charges and terms of payment 
are the equivalent of a contract between the College and its patrons. 
Neither the President nor the Business Manager is expected to modify 
these regulations without specific authorization from the Board of 
Trustees. 

In view of tbe prevailing uncertainty as to cost of labor and 
materials, the College reserves the right to change its fees for room 
and board at the beginning of each semester if conditions make it 
necessary. Patrons will be given advance notice of any change to be 
made. 

A student is not officially registered or entitled to enroll in any 
class until satisfactory financial arrangements have been made with 
the Business Manager. Under no circumstances will a student be 
allowed to take semester examinations or receive a transcript of her 
record until her account has been paid in full. 

A deduction of ten per cent on all charges is allowed for each 
student when two or more come from the same family. 

Members of the junior and senior classes planning to be mission- 
aries will receive, on certification by their local churches, an allowance 
of $100 on their expenses for tbe year. 

Students are not required to make a breakage deposit to eover 
unjustifiable damage to college property, but for such damage they will 
be expected to pay. 

Resident students are not charged for the ordinary services of 
the College physician and nurses, and for the use of the infirmary. 
For additional service in case of serious or prolonged illness, for all 
special medical prescriptions, x-ray, and fluoroscope, the patron is 
expected to pay. 

If a student withdraws or is dismissed from the institution 
before the end of a semester, no refund will be made for the quarter 
of tbe year in which she leaves. Proportionate refund may be allowed 
on residence charges if a student is continuously absent for at least 
four weeks because of illnesp. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 28 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOAN FUNDS, SELF-HELP 

Freshman Scholarships. The Board of Trustees authorizes the 
annual award of fifty scholarships to resident memhers of the in- 
coming freshman class. Fifteen of these scholarships are valued at 
$450.00 each; thirty-five, at $250.00 each. Awards will be based on 
outHtanding scholastic achievement and promise, qualities of social 
leadership, and financial need. A freshman applicant who feels 
qualified and desires to be considered as a scholarship recipient should 
address a request directly to President Carlyle Campbell, Meredith 
College. The application and supporting credentials should be sub- 
mitted by February 15. 

Upper-Class Scholarships. Thirty-five scholarships, valued at $250 
each, are awarded to resident members of the sophomore, junior, and 
senior classes on the basis stated above. Applications and supporting 
credentials should be submitted to the Dean by May 1. 

Endowed Scholarships. Friends of the College have established 
endowment funds for scholarship aid, the principal of which amounts 
to $41,050. These funds provide for seventeen scholarships, as indicated 
below. In some cases the donors have made specific restrictions affect- 
ing the award of the scholarships, but students interested may write 
the President of the College. Value, $120.00. 

The J. T. J. Battle Scholarships (four) 

The Z. M. Caveness Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. John E. Efird Scholarships (two) 

The Myrtle Hart Farmer Scholarship 

The Hester Farrior Scholarship 

The Fuller B. Ilamrii-k Scholarship 

The Ella G. Holoomb Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Matthews Scholarship 

The Ida Poteat Scholarship 

The Emma Barber Towler Scholarships (two) 

The Mollie B. Wyatt Scholarship 

The Thomas P. Pruitt Memorial Scholarship 

The llrlen Price Scholarship. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor 
Society awards to the freshman who maintains the highest scholastic 
average during her first year in college a scholarship valued at $100. 
The Society reserves the right to withhold or to change the value of 
the award if circumstances require adjustment. 

The Perry-IIarris Scholarship. A $250 scholarship given by Dr. 
Julia Hamlet Harris in memory of her mother, Mrs. Ella Perry 
Harris, to a student who has completed one year of study at Meredith 
in the upper fifth of lior class. Preference will be given to a student 
majoring or planning to major in English. 



24 JIEREDITH COLLEGE 

The Ruth Ann Euhhell Creative Writing Award. The interest 
on $500, the gift of Miss Hubbell, an alumna, will be given each year 
to that student whose work submitted in competition for the award 
gives best evidence of ability and sustained interest in creative writing. 
Details may be obtained from the Department of English. 

Lillie Grandy Scholarship Fund. Granted under the will of the 
late Miss Lillie Grandy of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, the income 
from this fund makes available for the year 1964-'65, eight $300.00 
scholarships. Applicants must be residents of Camden County or 
Pasquotank County, North Carolina, and must have completed the first 
year at Meredith College and "have proven to the faculty during their 
freshman year that they have intellectual ability and sterling character." 
These scholarships may be renewed during the junior and senior years 
if in the judgment of the faculty the recipients prove themselves 
worthy. Applications should be submitted to the Chairman of the 
Scholarship Committee. 

College Loan Funds. Earnings from the funds listed are available 
for loan purposes to students is residence. Inquiries should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. David G. Olmsted, Business Manager and Treasurer, 
Meredith College. 

The Elizabeth Avery Colton Loan Fund 

The Louis M. Curtis Loan Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. O. S. Goodwin Loan Fund 

The Mabel L. Haynes Loan Fund 

The John M. W. Hicks Loan Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs, John Billingsley Ingram Loan Fund 

The Henrietta S. Jaiman Loan Fund 

The Edna Tyner Langston Loan Fund 

The Helen Josephine Neal Loan Fund 

The Olive Chapel Loan Fund 

The William H. Reddish Loan Fund 

The Dr. and Mrs. Tliomas M. Stanback Loan Fund 

The W. A. Thomas Student Loan Fund ^ 

The National Defense Student Loan Program. The National 
Defense Education Act provides for the creation, at American Colleges 
and Universities, of loan funds for which needy students may borrow 
on reasonable terms for the purpose of completing their higher 
education. This act requires that special consideration be given to 
students with superior academic backgrounds who intend to teach 
in public elementary or secondary schools or those whose academic 
background indicates superior capacity or preparation in science, 
mathematics, or a modern foreign language. Students interested in 
knowing more about this loan program should consult Mr. D. G. 
Olmsted, Business Manager and Treasurer, Meredith College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 25 

The Ida Poteat Loan Fund. This fund has been provided for 
juniora and seniors through the alumnae of the College. Application 
blanks will be fui'nished upon request addressed to Miss Mae Qrimmer, 
Alumnae Secretary, Meredith College. 

Self-ITelp. Many students needing financial assistance reduce 
their expenses by part-time employment in the dining room, in the 
library and in various oifices and academic departments of the college. 
Compensation varies with the character and amount of service rendered, 
but usually ranges from $125 to $250 for the year. Initial correspond- 
ence may be addressed to the President or to the Business Manager. 
Available appointments will be made on the basis of apparent ability 
and need. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1964 



During the summer of 1964 the College will operate a six-week 
term beginning June 8 and ending July 18. Admission to the 
summer session is on the same basis as in the regular year. Graduates 
of accredited high schools who are planning to enter college in Septem- 
ber may begin some regular courses here in June. Attendance at the 
summer session will enable a student to complete her work in less 
than the usual time. The maximum amount of credit is six semester 
hours for the summer session (i.e., three hours each for two courses 
meeting daily). 

Regular academic courses will be available in several fields of 
instruction, including music. Private lessons may be arranged in this 
field. 

Full information about the summer session may be obtained by 
writing to the Dean of the College. 



ADMISSION 

Students may be admitted to Meredith College as candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts either as members of the freshman 
class or as students with advanced standing from other colleges. 
Before being accepted, candidates must present credentials giving 
satisfactory evidence that in scholarship, health, and character they 
are qualified for the educational program and standards maintained 
in this institution. 

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

Communications with regard to entrance should be addressed to 
the President of the College, who, upon request, will mail an application 
for admission. Applications, with the appropriate fee, should be re- 
turned to the President. 

Arrangements should be made by the applicant to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and three Achievement Tests of the College 
Entrance Examination Board, details of which are given below. 
Not earlier than the close of the first semester for each freshman 
applicant the Dean will secure from the proper school official a 
certified academic record showing units, grades, and rank in graduating 
class. It is at this time that the student applying for advanced 
standing should request a complete transcript of her college work be 
sent to Meredith. 

Each student will be notified concerning her admission as promptly 
as possible after records have been evaluated. When an applicant ia 
notified that she qualifies academically for admission, she is then 
sent a medical form to be completed by her physician. A dormitory 
placement sheet is sent to all resident students. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN 

Secondary School Work 

For admission to the freshman class, high school graduates must 
offer a minimum of sixteen units of credit accumulated in grades nine 
through twelve. A unit represents a year's study of a subject in a 
secondary school, and is estimated to be equivalent to one-fourth of a 
full year's work. 

Of the sixteen units presented, four must be in English; nine 
must be chosen from language, history, social studies, mathematics 
and natural science; three additional units are required in these 
subjects or from electives approved by Meredith College. If a foreign 
language is included, at least two units of one language must be 
presented. 

(26) 



ADMISSION 27 

For students entering after January, 1965, the following specific 
units will be required : at least two units of one foreign language, two 
units of algebra, and one unit of geometry. 

Each student applying for admisoion from a secondary school 
must rank in the upper half of her graduating class. It is to be 
noted that 83% of the freshmen entering in September ranked in the 
upper quarter of their graduating classes. 

College Board Examinations 

Beginning with students entering in 1965-'66, Meredith will require 
all applicants, including transfer students, to take the following exami- 
nations of the College Entrance Examination Board : the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and three Achievement Tests which must include 
English Composition, a foreign language, and one other subject-matter 
test of the student's choice. Applicants to Meredith are urged to com- 
plete these tests in either December or January, and it is recommended 
that the Scholastic Aptitude Test be taken in December and the 
Achievement Tests in January. 

For 1964-'65, the three-hour Scholastic Aptitude Test, administered 
at several centers in each state, will be given during the morning and 
the Achievement Tests during the afternoon on the following dates : 

Saturday, December 5, 1964 Saturday, March 6, 1965 

Saturday, January 9, 1965 Saturday, May 1, 1965 

Wednesday, July 14, 1965 

The student should write as soon as possible directly to the College 
Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N. J., and request 
a Bulletin of Information and descriptive booklets, all three publica- 
tions obtainable without charge. (These publications often may be 
obtained froTu high school oflicials.) The Bulletin gives detailed in- 
formation about fees ($5.00 for the Scholastic Aptitude Test, $7.50 for 
the Acliievement Tests) ; the cities where the examination centers are 
located ; and the dates when applications are to be returned for each 
date listed above. The descriptive booklets, entitled A Description of 
of the College Board Scholastic Aptitxide Test and A Description of 
the College Board Achievement Tests, give a brief description of the 
tests and sample test questions. 

Each student considering Meredith should indicate on the test 
application card that she wishes the report of her scores sent to Meredith 
College, Baleigh, N. C. 

For students entering Meredith through January, 1965, the College 
Board examinations required are the Scholastic Aptitude Test and tho 
Writing Sample, but all students entering thereafter will be required 
to have taken the specified Achievement Tests instead of the Writing 
Sample. 



28 MEREDITH COLLEGE 



EARLY DECISION PLAN 



For the unquestionably well-qualified student who definitely desires 
to enter Meredith College there is designed an Early Decision Plan. 
Under this plan the applicant must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
of the College Entrance Examination Board before her senior year 
in high school. She should file application for admission to the College, 
with the appropriate fee, by September 15 of her senior year, requesting 
in an accompanying letter that her application receive an "early de- 
cision" and certifying that she is, therefore, applying only to Meredith. 
On the basis of Junior year test scores, the applicant's three-year high 
school record, together with a notice of courses being pursued in the 
senior year and recommendations from school officials, the admissions 
officer will accept the qualified applicant by October 15 of her senior 
year. Dormitory students will be requested to make an advance pay- 
ment of $50.00 by November 15. This advance payment is not 
refundable. 

If, however, credentials do not justify early acceptance, the 
applicant will be notified in the fall either that her application has 
been rejected or that action on the application will be deferred until 
the spring semester. In the latter case students will be asked to repeat 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test and to enroll for the Achievement Tests 
on the December or January testing date; and they will, of course, 
be free to file applications at other institutions if they desire. 

As this is the first year in which Meredith will require that 
applicants take Achievement Tests, the college will in October, 1964, 
accept well-qualified applicants who have not taken Achievement Tests 
in their junior year. Students accepted at that time, however, will be 
requested to take the appropriate Achievement Tests in their senior 
year. After 1964, no applicant will be considered until she has sub- 
mitted Achievement Test scores. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED STANDING 

A student applying for advanced standing should present the 
following information: (a) an official transcript of her record, .'in- 
cluding a statement of honorable dismissal, from the institution last 
attended; (b) details of the units offered for college entrance and the 
name of the high school from which the entrance units were received ; 
(c) satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board; (d) satisfactory scores on the College 
Entrance Examination Board Achievement Tests in English Composi- 
tion, a foreign language, and one other subject-matter field. Also, see 
on the previous page the statement of test requirements for those students 
entering through January, 1965. 

Students who have completed two years of college work should 
indicate the major and other subjects which they expect to pursue. 
Students admitted from other colleges with fewer quality points than 



ADMISSION 29 

semester hours of credit must make up the deficiency at Meredith 
College. 

When the candidate comes from a college belonging to the Southcrii 
Association of Colleges and Schools, or an association of related 
rank, she will be given credit for the courses acceptable toward 
a degree at Meredith College. 

Candidates from other colleges will be given provisional crediif 
which must be validated by success in work undertaken at Meredith 
College, or by examinations. In order to validate the provisional 
credit allowed a student from a non-accredited institution, other than 
by examination, she must make a minimum of twenty-four semester 
hours and twenty-four quality points during her first two semesters 
at Meredith. A student who fails to reach this standard will have 
her provisional credits reduced in number by the deficiency in hours 
or quality points. 

The maximum credit accepted from a junior college is sixty-two 
semester hours. Not more than thirty-two semester hours will br 
accredited for the work of either year in a junior college. 

A student transferring to Meredith at the beginning of the junior 
year will be expected to take at Meredith at least twelve hours ii, 
the department in which she is a major. A student transferring ai 
the beginning of the senior year will be expected to take at Meredith 
at least nine hours in the department in which she is a major. 

RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student desiring to return to the College after an absence of 
more than a year should apply to the Dean for re-admission. Official 
transcripts of record at all other institutions should be submitted, 
together with a statement of honorable dismissal. Such a student will 
comply with the requirements either of the catalogue imder which 
she is re-admitted, or of a subsequent catalogue. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Part-time students are understood to be those qualifying for a 
degree who enroll for not more than nine credit hours a semester. 
Such students will meet the entrance requirements outlined above. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

A student of mature age who gives evidence of a serious purpose 
and who is otherwise properly qualified is allowed to enter a special 
course without fulfilling the entrance requirements. All such courses 
must be approved by the Dean and the instructor concerned, but will 
not receive (;ollege credit. 



30 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

ORIENTATION-REGISTRATION 

All students, upon arrival in the city, should enroll promptly 
at the office of the Dean of Students. Dormitories will be open to 
receive freshmen and transfer students at 11 :00 a.m. on Wednesday, 
September 9. The orientation and registration program begins at 
8 :30 a.m. on Thursday, September 10. Returning students should ar- 
rive in time to complete their registration by 3 :00 p.m. on Monday, 
September 14. All students who fail to complete registration on the 
date specified must pay a special fee of two dollars. 

AH freshmen and all transfer students are expected to take part 
in the special program arranged for the opening week. Included in 
this program will be a physical examination, instruction in the use 
of the library, social activities and achievement tests, English and 
language placement tests, registration, and talks on various phases 
of college life. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Meredith College confers two degrees, that of Bachelor of Arts 
and that of Bachelor of Music. To be eligible for a degree, a student 
must meet the academic requirements for the degree and must be a 
person of imquestionably good character.^ 

The requirements for these degrees are based on the general 
principle of a broad distribution of studies among the representative 
fields of human culture and a concentration of studies within a special 
field. The object of distribution is to give the student a general view 
of our cultural heritage and to broaden her outlook. The object of 
concentration is to aid the student in acquiring comprehensive knowl- 
edge and systematic training in a particular field of scholarly achieve- 
ment. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Hours: A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must 
complete at least 120 semester hours of work. Each semester hour 
of credit is supposed to represent for the average student three houra 
of academic work a week, including preparation, classes and labora- 
tories. 

Residence: Every candidate for the degree must attend Meredith 
College for one full year, with not less than thirty semester hours of 
credit. If she enters from a senior college not approved by the 
Southern Association or by an association of related rank, she must 
attend for at least two years. The last thirty semester hours must 
be taken at Meredith College, except that not more than six^ semester 
hours may be taken at another institution of approved standing.' 

A student who completes the work required by the College for 
the Bachelor's degree will be granted the degree at the end of that 
session. 

Grades: The College requires that aU students maintain at least 
an average grade of C in : 

1. All grades of courses offered for graduation. 

2. All grades of courses completed at Meredith. 

3. All grades of courses completed at Meredith in the field of 
concentration. 



' A student may elect lo follow the degre* requirements listed In any subsequent 

cataloirue In force during her period of residence. 
• See exception, P. 35. 
"These exceptions do not apply to senior transfer students. 

(31) 



32 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

4. All gTade8 of courses completed at Meredith in the major 
subject. 

5. All grades of courses completed in the senior year. 

I. Prescribed Courses 

To be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, a 
candidate must have completed 52 to 69 hours from the prescribed 
com-scs listed below. These course requirements should be met by the 

end of the junior year. 

Semester 

nours 

Art or MusUs. Art 231, 359, 360 or Music 101 and 102 or 226 3-6 

Those majoring in home economics may substitute Art 362. 

English. English 101-102, English 221-222 12 

Foreign Language 6-18 

High School Units Offered College Requirements 

None 18 hrs. in one language or 

12 hrs. in each of two 

Two units in one language 12 hrs. in any language 

Two units in each of two languages 6 hrs. in one of these or 

12 hrs. in a third language 

Four units in one language 6 hrs. in that language 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences 12-14 

Biology 101-102; Chemistry 101-102; Mathematics 101, 102; Physics 
221-222. 

Social Studies 12 

History 101-102 and six hours chosen from the following : Economics 
221, 222; Geography 201, 202, 231, 302; Political Science 201, 202; 
Psychology 221 ; Sociology 221, 222. Transfer students entering with 
six semester hours in European or ancient history will have met the 
requirement in history. Majors in Home Economics may substitute 
Sociology 374 for Sociology 222. 

Religion. Religion 101, 102 6 

Health Education. Health Education 101 or 102 ' 1 

StndentH rraiisferriug to Meredith College as juniors or seniors will be 
excused from this requirement. 

Physical Education 

Only one course in physical education will he required during any one 
HPmester except for the student who failed a course in physical education 
the previous semester. Students enrolled for Physical Education 386 may 
substitute this for an activity course for that semester. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 33 

Students entering Meredith must successfully complete physical educa- 
tion courses according to the following program — unless excused by the 
Dean- 

Those entering as first-year students — three years 
Those entering as second-year students — two years 
Those entering as third-year students — one year 

II. Field of Concentration 

Each student will select a field of concentration consisting of at least 
forty-two semester hours distributed as follows : eighteen to twenty-four 
semester hours in a major subject and twenty-four to eighteen semester 
hours in one or two related subjects, with a minimum of six semester 
hours in a subject. The field of concentration may not include any 
courses open primarily to freshmen. Required courses not open pri- 
marily to freshmen may coimt as a part of the field of concentration. 

Concentration in a field of study is intended to be more than a 
series of unrelated courses listed in the catalogue imder several depart- 
ments. The work required of each student in a field of concentration 
should be planned by the major department as a unified, coherent whole, 
consisting of closely related courses. The requirements of a depart- 
mental major in a field of concentration are listed under each depart- 
ment. Without consent of the administrative council, a student may 
not change her major subject after becoming a senior. 

Not later than the close of the sophomore year, a candidate for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts shall select a departmental major. 
When this selection has been approved by the department concerned, 
the chairman of that department becomes the adviser of the student. The 
program of studies arranged by the chairman of the department and the 
student must receive the final approval of the dean. 

The major must be selected from the following list of subjects: 

Art History 

Biology Home Economics 

Business Mathematics 

Chemistry Music 

Economics Psychology and Philosophy 

B^nglish Religion 

Foreign Lnnguagi-s — French, Sociology 
I.atln, Spanish 

The related subject or subjects may be selected either from the 
above list of major subjects or from the following list of subjects: 

KUucatlon l'hllosoi)hy 

Geography roliticnl Science 

German Speech 



34 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Music will be granted to students who 
already hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and 
meet the requirements as stated on page CD of the catalogue. One 
additional year of study confined exclusively to music will usually be 
necessary to secure this degree. 

During their course of study, students will be expected to conform 
to the regulations for seniors, including class attendance and scholastic 
attainment. 

THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

Usually freshmen register for the following courses: English, a 
foreign language, health education, physical education, and three 
courses chosen from history, mathematics, natural sciences, and religion. 
Some variation from this schedule may be necessary for students plan- 
ning to major in art, home economics or music. 

The sixteen hours normally to be taken each semester should be 
chosen from the following courses: 

Art 101-102 History 101-102 

Biologv 101-102 Home Eoonomics 101, 104 

Chemistrv 101-102 Latin 101-102; 221-222 

English ioi-102 Matliematics 101, 102 

French 101-102; 221-222 Music (S«e Department) 

German 101-102; 221-222 Religion 101, 102 

Health Education 101 or 102 Spanish 101-102 ; 221-222 

REGULATIONS CONCERNING COURSES 

Registration and Withdrawal. As every student schedule must 
be approved by the Dean, a student may enter or withdraw from a 
course only on his authority. 

A student may be permitted by the Dean to drop a course during 
the first six weeks of a semester without penalty. Thereafter she will 
receive an F grade on the course if that grade represents the quality of 
work done for the period. 

Amount of Work. No regular student is permitted to take fewer 
than fourteen semester hours of elasswork a week without permission 
of the Dean, except that under the following conditions students may 
register for only twelve hours : seniors enrolled for the course in super- 
vised teaching; a music major with a recital to prepare; a student in 
poor health or one engaged in outside work that demands much of her 
time. 

No student may register for more than sixteen hours if she failed 
to make an average grade above C for the preceding semester. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 35 

The maximum nimiber of credit hours allowed during any 
semester for any student taking physical education is eighteen; for 
other students the maximum is nineteen hours. 

Prescribed Courses. Prescribed courses take precedence over 
elective courses in the schedule of work for a semester. 

During her freshman and sophomore years a student may not 
take concurrently two courses in the same department without the 
permission of the Dean. 

Students who do not complete the foreign language requirement 
in the freshman year must continue language study imtil the require- 
ment is met. 

Restricted Credit for Juniors and Seniors. Twelve hours of 
credit in courses primarily for freshmen may be taken in the junior 
and senior years, not more than six hours of which may be taken 
during the senior year. 

Credit in Music. A maximum of twenty-four semester hours in 
music may be counted by students not majoring in music as elective 
credits towards the Bachelor of Arts degree. All such credit in applied 
music must be validated by equal credit (with a grade of C or better) 
in courses selected from Theory or History and Literature. 

A maximum credit of four semester hours is allowed all students 
in ensemble courses — chorus or orchestra. This credit need not be 
substantiated by work in theoretical music. 

Maximum Credit in a Subject. The maximum amount of work 
that a student may take in any one subject, other than the Department 
of Music, is forty hours. Students having a major in the Department 
of Music may take a maximum of sixty semester hours from the various 
subdivisions of that department. 

Repeating Courses. A course may be repeated only if the student 
registers for the course the next time it is offered. If this is impossible 
because of schedule conflict with another required course, the student 
must register with the Dean her intention of taking the course as soon 
as there is no conflict with any other required course. 

Correspondence Credit. A maximum credit of six semester hours 
may be allowed for correspondence courses (with a grade of C or 
higher) after written permission has been obtained from the Dean. 

Deficiency in English. The Department of English may require 
special work in composition of a student who .'iuhmits to any depart- 
ment a piiper containing gross errors in English composition. 

Final Worh for a Degree. Not more than six semester hours of the 
last thirty may be taken in another institution of approved standing as 



36 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

the final work necessary for graduation, except in the case of four-hour 
courses, in which ease eight hours of credit will be allowed. Such courses 
must be approved in advance by the Dean. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Students must be regular and prompt in their attendance at all 
classes, conferences, and other academic appointments. They most 
accept full responsibility for any announcements or assignments missed 
because of absence. Such absences, even when permitted, tend to lower 
a student's standing in courses. 

In each class during a semester as many absences will be allowed 
as there are class sessions per week. This ruling includes absencea 
from classes, private lessons in music, and laboratory periods. This 
number will ordinarily suffice for absences due to illness as well as to 
other causes. 

Absences from class at the last session before or the first session 
after a holiday (except for sickness in the College infirmaiy, or oft 
the campus with a statement from a physician, parent, or guardian) 
will be counted as two absences if these absences come within two 
days before or after a holiday. For a class meeting five days a week, 
two absences will be counted if the student is absent the day before 
the holiday. 

Absence because of illness — in the infirmary, or off the campus 
with a statement from a physician, parent or guardian — will be counted 
as one-third of an absence. For non-resident students a written excuse 
from parent or physician to cover absences from classes and chapel 
should be handed to the Registrar upon the student's return to classes. 
Absences due to extended illness may be excused at the discretion of the 
Dean. Absence caused by the serious illness or the death of a member 
of the immediate family will also be coimted as one-third of an absence. 

When arranged for in advance by the Dean, a student on the 
eligibility list may have as many as three additional absences from 
each course, without penalty, to attend meetings of an officially 
recognized campus organization, to represent the College as a whole, 
or to participate in academic off-campus activities. 

Absences beyond the number allowed will be classified as unexcused, 
and one quality point or fraction thereof will be deducted from the 
total number of quality points for the semester for each absence or 
fractional absence unexcused. 

The following regulation will apply to students taking physical 
education activity courses: 

A student is required to attend at least 80% of the semester's 
class sessions in order to receive a passing grade in the course. 
Absences are thus provided for Dlness — except in the case of extended 
illness. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 37 

In cases of extended illness, the Dean and the Department Head 
will confer with the infirmary, and make provision either to permit 
work to be made up, or to recommend that the student drop the 
course. 

All absences will be reported as usual to the Registrar, who, in 
turn will post these on the board with other absences. 

Students registered in Education 495 are granted two full days 
of absence from regular college classes beyond those provided for above. 

Students authorized by the Department of Education to do 
substitute teaching in the city schools may be excused from classes 
on that day. 

Students on the Dean's List and Seniors (academic classification) 
are granted optional class attendance except at the last session of a 
class before or the first session after a holiday. If they have not 
incurred more than one absence from each class preceding a holiday, 
they are entitled to one absence from each class session immediately 
preceding or following the holiday. For class absences on these days 
in excess of this provision (except for sickness in the College infirmary, 
or off the campus with a statement from a physician, parent or 
guardian), quality points will be deducted from the total number of 
quality points earned that semester. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Each course receives one official semester grade, an evaluation 
of the entire work of the student during the semester. The grade 
of scholarship is reported in letters; A, B, C, and D indicate passing 
grades; F indicates failure. A grade of Inc. indicates that the student's 
work is incomplete. If an Inc. is not completed during the next 
semester, it automatically becomes an F. 

QUALITY POINTS 

The minimum scholastic average of C, or a credit ratio of 1.0, 
required of a candidate for a degree, is determined by the quality 
points to which her course grades entitle her. Each semester hour 
with a grade of A carries three quality points; B, two; C, one. 

Quality point deductions made because of excessive class absences 
will be applied in computing the total number of quality points for 
graduation, for Dean's List standing, for eligibility, and for retention. 



38 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

ELIGIBILITY LIST 

An Eligibility List is prepared at the beginning of each, semester. 
The list includes the names of students who have maintained during 
the previous semester the minimum academic standards for College 
representation or for student activities as indicated in the Student 
Handbook. Requii'ements for inclusion on the list are as follows : 

1. That a student should have been registered for at least twelve 
semester hours of credit; 

2. That she should have completed and passed all courses with an 
overall average of C or better; 

3. That her conduct is approved by the Dean of Students. 

DEAN'S LIST 

At the end of each semester there is published a Dean's List of 
students who have attained high scholastic standing. In this list are 
names of students registered for at least twelve hours. They should 
have completed and passed all courses with a number of quality points 
equal to twice the number of semester hours taken plus three. 

A student may be removed by the Dean from this list during the 
semester if her conduct or grades are such as to make removal advisable. 

GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts with distinction is conferred upon 
a student under the following conditions : 

(1) A student must have been in residence at Meredith College 
at least two years and must have earned a minimum of fifty- 
seven semester hours. 

(2) For the purpose of computing the standing of a student all 
semester hours taken for degree credit at Meredith College 
are counted. 

(3) Those whose average is two and two-tenths quality points per 
semester hour are graduated cum laude; those whose average 
is two and seven-tenths quality points per semester hour are 
graduated magna cum laude; those whose average is two and 
nine-tenths quality points per semester hoiu" are graduated 
summa cum, laude. 

No student shall be graduated with distinction unless her grades 
on all her college work, including any taken at other colleges, meet 
the required standards set up for such honors. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 39 

CLASSIFICATION' 

Students are classified at the beginning of each semester. To 
be classified as a sophomore, a student must have at least twenty-three 
semester hours of credit and sixteen quality points; to be classified 
as a junior, at least fifty-six hours of credit and fifty quality points; 
to be classified as a senior, at least eighty-six hours of credit and 
eighty-four quality points. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Final examinations are held in all courses at the end of each 
semester. No credit should be expected for a course if the examination 
is not taken as scheduled, unless another date is authorized by the 
Dean and the instructor concerned. A special fee will be charged for 
individual examinations thus allowed. 

Seniors have examinations at the same time as other students, 
except that seniors who have examinations on the last Thursday and 
Friday of the second semester will take them on the preceding Thursday 
and Friday. 

At the end of each semester a report is sent to the parent or 
guardian of a student, showing her grade of scholarship and absences 
from classes. 

RETENTION OF STUDENTS 

During each semester of her first college year a student must pass 
at least six semester hours. However, in order to continue beyond her 
first college year, a student must have passed a minimum of fifteen 
hours. She must, also, have passed enough additional hours, or 
have accumulatod enough quality points, so that the total of semester 
hoars and quality points is at least twenty-four. 

After the first year in college a student must pass a minimum of 
nine semester hours each semester. Unless she has also accumulated 
nine quality points for the same semester, she will be placed on 
academic probation for the following semester. Probationary status 
will not be permitted for two successive semesters. A written notice 
of such probation will be sent to the parents and to the student. 

Before a student is permitted to register for her third college 
year she must have accumulated, during regular and summer sessions, 
a minimum of forty-four semester hours and thirty-eight quality 
points. 

A student who does not meet these minimum requirements will be 
dropped from the College for one semester. She may apply for re- 
admission either by submitting a transcript of work completed at 



40 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

another approved institution or in some other way demonstrating to 
the College authorities that she is qualified to continue at Meredith. 
Summer school credits, while encouraged, will not be considered as 
the equivalent of one full semester of regular college work. 

The College reserves the right to exclude at any time a student 
whose academic standing or conduct it regards as undesirable, without 
the necessity of preferring specific charges against her. 



VOCATIONAL PREPARATION 

The CoUege offers certain phases of vocational education on the 
college level and not in competition with the purely professional aiid 
vocational schools. Students may enter, among others, the following 
fields : 

1. Business 5. Religion 

2. Graduate Study 6. Social "Welfare 

3. Library Work 7. Teaching 

4. Medicine, Medical Technology, a. Elementary 

Nursing b. Secondary 

The College offers courses of instruction leading to a major in 
Business. This course is not open to freshmen. This training qualifies 
students to hold positions in the business world. Courses in shorthand 
and typewriting are also available (without credit) to prospective 
librarians, religious and social workers, teachers, or other students not 
majoring in business. 

Students planning to enter professional schools or to do graduate 
work after leaving Meredith should secure advance information about 
the requirements which they must satisfy. The Dean of the College 
will be glad to assist the individual student, in keeping with the 
degree requirements of this institution, to plan her course of study 
with these aims in view. 

In the natural sciences, fully accredited pre-professional courses 
are offered for laboratory technicians, nurses, and students of medicine. 

The Department of Religion trains teachers of Bible and personnel 
for association and local church work. 

Because of the increasing demand for various types of trained 
social workers, the curriculum has been expanded to include all 
prerequisites for professional training at accredited schools of social 
work. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 41 

SUMMER SESSION CREDITS 

A student who plans to attend a summer session at another 
accredited college should make application for transfer credit through 
the Dean's office. She will also secure the written approval of appro- 
priate heads of departments for courses she plans to take. The 
maximum credit allowed for a summer term is on the basis of one 
semester hour per week. Eligibility status is not affected by summer 
session credits. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Official withdrawal of resident students is made in the office 
of the Dean of Students. Withdrawal of non-resident students is 
made in the office of the Dean of the College. 

Failure to make official withdrawal forfeits the right of honorable 
dismissal. 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 

A course with an odd number is given the first semester ; a course with an 
even number, the second semester. If an S follows the odd number, the 
course is repeated in the second semester; if an F follows the even number, 
the course is also offered in the first semester. 

A course with two numbers continues throughout the year. If the numbers 
are connected with a hyphen, no permanent credit is allowed until the full 
year's work is completed. 

Courses are numbered as follows : the 100 courses for freshmen, the 200 
courses for sophomores, the 300 courses for juniors and seniors. The 400 
courses are for seniors only except by special permission. 

Brackets enclosing the number and title of a course indicate that the 
course is not given for the current year. 

The College does not guarantee to offer any course listed below for which 
there is not a minimum registration of five students. 

A "block" course is taught for the first half of a semester, six days a 
week. Student teaching under supervision Is scheduled for the second half 
of either semester. 

ART 

Lucy Bane Jeffries, Assistant Professor 

Arthur C. Downs, Assistant Professor 

Anne Hill, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major: a total of thirty hours In Art Including 
101-102, 221, 222, 359, 360, and 498. 

101-102. BEGINNING DRAWING AND COMPOSITION Credit, Six Hootb 
Six studio hours a week. 

An introductory course in basic design. Emphasis is placed upon the 
elements and principles of design with particular attention to drawing and 
composition in the fall semester and to the use of color in the spring semester. 
Studio problems involve the use of a variety of materials. Through group 
and individual criticism, the development of Individual creative ability IB 
encouraged. 

Prerequisite for Art 102 : Art 101 or Art 243. 

Credit for Art 101 given upon completion of Art 102, Ed. 386A 

or Art 362. Mrs. Jeffries 

221, 222. CREATIVE DESIGN Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 

A course offering the student an opportunity to develop creativeness In 
two and three-dimensional design and technical ability in the use of various 
materials. Mrs. Jeffries 

226. CERAMICS Credit, Three Hours 

An introductory course in ceramic processes and material. Projects In 
coil, slab, and wheel methods of construction. Experimentation with various 
types of decoration. 

Not open to freshmen except by special permission. Mr. Downa 

(42) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 

229. ADVANCED DRAWING Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio honrs a weeli. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 
Problems in sketching, figure drawing, Illustration and perspective 
drawing. Mr. Downs 

231, 231S. ART APPRECIATION Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to satisfy the need of students for a key to 
the enjoyment of art. Through illustrated lectures and class discussions, 
the art of past cultures and modern times is introduced to the student. Not 
open to art majors. Mr. Downs 

243. BEGINNING ART Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
A course in the fundamentals of art for others than art majors. Con- 
sideration of the elements and principles of design and their application In 
problems involving various art media. Staff 

257S. ELEMENTARY SCULPTURE Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

An introductory course in modeling and construction of three-dimensional 

subjects. Emphasis is placed upon the creative phase of sculpturing and 

upon technical process and techniques. Mr. Downs 

847, 348. BEGINNING PAINTING Credit, Three or Sis Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite : Art 101-102 or by special permission. 
A studio course In creative painting In various media including casein, 
watercolor, and oil. Mrs. Jeffries 

359. HISTORT OF ANCIENT ART Credit, Three Hours 
A survey of the significant art of the East and West from prehistoric 

times to the Renaissance. Mr. Downs 

360. HISTORT OF MODERN ART Credit, Three Hours 
A survey of the principal trends of sculpture, painting and architecture 

from the Uenai.ssance of tlie present. Mr. Downs 

[362. INTERIOR DECORATION Credit, Three Hours] 

Six studio hours a week. 
A course to familiarize the student with historical and contemporary 
home furnishing and decoration. S'tudlo problems and Interior design. 

Mrs. .Tcffries 

Ed. aS6A. METHODS IN THE TEACHING OF ART Credit, Three Hours 
Two lectures and four sludlo hours a week. 
Section a & b. For KIciiiontary Education Teachers 

Prcreiiuisite : Art, 101, Art 243, or permission of the department. 
Section c. For .\rt Majors 

I'rereiiuisite : 12 hours of Art. 

A study of the aims vt art in (he scliool and Its place in the Integral 

progrniii ; practice In art problems for the classroom teacher, together with 

the selection and preparation of Illustrative material to meet the needs of 

pupils of dilTerent grade levels. Miss Hill 



44 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

453, 454. ADVANCED PAINTING Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio liours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 347, 348. 

Mra. Jeffries 

466F. COMMERCIAL ART Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 
A course for the student interested in the nature and application of art 
materials for the commercial art field. Illustration, fashion drawing, window 
display, and advertising art are among the projects covered. Mr. Downs 

491. STUDIO PROBLEMS Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to permit advanced practice and research by art 
majors in their fields of special interest. Painting, sculpture, design, interior 
decoration, or materials and methods of teaching art are suggested fields 
of study. These courses must be scheduled by special arrangement with 
the department head. Staff 

498. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

A study and review group meeting with the staflf to consider current 

problems, advanced techniques, and other problems related to art. 

Required of all art majors in their senior year. Preparation for the 

exhibition required of all senior majors is made in this class. 

Mrs. Jeffries 

BIOLOGY 

John A. Yarbrough, Professor 

James H. Eads, Assistant Professor 

Helen P. Kelman, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major : twenty-seven semester hours, including 
Biology 101-102, 221, 222, 351 and 364. Other requirements include Chemistry 
101-102, 221, Mathematics 101, 102 or their equivalent. Ed. 385 Sc. does not 
count toward the major. 

101-102. GENERAL BIOLOGY Credit, Six hours 

Two lectures, one conference and two laboratory hours a w«ek. 
A course presenting the most important biological facts and principles, 
and so relating them that the student can apply them to the ordinary affairs 
of life. A study of protoplasm, the cell, the role of green plants, including 
simple experiments in plant physiology, the adjustment of organisms to their 
environment, and the structure and functions of vertebrates with special 
reference to man constitutes the work of the first semester. During the 
second semester a study of typical animal and plant forms is made as an 
Introduction to these two kingdoms. Staff 

221. GENERAL BOTANY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six laboratory or 
field-trip hours a week. 
A study of the morphological and physiological aspects of the seed plants 
followed by a survey of the major groups of the plant kingdom. 

Mr. Yarbrough 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 45 

222. GENERAL ZOOLOGT Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six laboratory 

hours a week. 

A phyloKenetic survey of the entire animal kingdom with weighted 

emphasis on invertebrates. Both type animals and transitional forms are 

studied as to life history, morphology, physiology and economic Importance 

Mr. Eads 

351. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102; Biology 222 recommended. Two 

lectures and six laboratory hours a week. 

A course dealing with the morphology, anatomy, and development of the 

various vertebrate organs nnd systems of organs. Various vertebrate types, 

tnoluding lish. amphibia, and mammals to be dissected in the laboratory. 

Alternates with 353. Mr. Eads 



[353. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102, Chemistry 101-102. Especially adapted 
to students preparing to study medicine or nursing, or to become 
tethuiciaiis. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory a week. 
An;!tomy to be studied only so far as it is necessary to understand the 
functiiiiis of the different systems of the body. Laboratory work to include 
study of muscles and nervous systems of other animals, and simple experi- 
ments. Mr. Kads 
Alternates with 361. 

354. HISTOLOGY Credit, Three Bours 

i'rerequlsite: Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102. Especially 

adapted to students preparing to study medicine or nursing, or to 

become teshnicians. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. 

The first Imlf of tlie course is devoted to slide preparation, employing 

pliinl nnd aiilinal tis.^iios. Tlie paraffin method is emphasized, with some 

attention to the celloidln nnd freezing techniques. The second half consists 

of a careful mi(Tosco[)ic analysis of the common animal tissues. 

Alternates with 356. Mr. Yarbrough 

2B5. GENETICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102 or Its equivalent. Three lectures a 

week. 

Deslgncil clilcfly for a thorough presentation of modern genetic prlnciplea 

and with cNHiMplcs from [ilnnt nnd animal breeding. Attempts arc also 

mndc to n|iply such Infornmtlon in sociological and psychological considera- 

tlons and In liunian well-being. Mr. Eads 

[:!50. VERTKBRATE EMBRYOLOGY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prere<]uisite : Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six laboratory 
hours a week. 
Lahorntory study of maturation, fertilization, segmentation, formation of 

germ Inyrs. origin of ciiarncterlstic vertebrnte orgnns In representative forms. 

S|K'<'iiil ciiipliM.slH phict'd on the chick nnd pig in Inboratory, and outride 

readings to show conipiirative stages In other vertebrates. 

Alternates with 364. Mr. Bads 



46 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

[359. PLANT ANATOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102 and 221. One lecture and six 
laboratory hours a week. 
A study of cellular units of seed plants, including both woody and 

herbaceous types. Mr. Tarbrough 

364. MICROBIOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

Recommended for home economics majors. Elective for others. 
Prerequisite : Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102 or their equiva- 
lents. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. 
A general study of bacteria, yeasts, and molds, with emphasis on the 
applicati^n of the principles of bacteriology to everyday life. Laboratory 
work to include culture and staining techniques ; principles of sterilization 
and disinfection ; bacteriological examination of air, water, and milk, and 
experiments on fermentation. Mr. Yarbrough 

[366. PLANT TAXONOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite : Biology 101-102. One lecture and six laboratory or 
field-trip hours a week. 
A study of the external morphology, identification, classification, and dis- 
tribution of the seed plants in the vicinity. Mr. Yarbrough 

Ed. 385 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit Three Hours 

See page 55. Miss Yarbrough and Mr. Yarbrough 

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Lois Frazier, Professor 
Evelyn P. Simmons, Instructor 
Ruth B. Robinson, Instructor 

The Department of Business and Economics offers a major in business 
and a major in economics. Students have a choice of counting certain 
designated courses for credit as either business or economics. 

Courses in this department are not open to freshmen. 



BUSINESS 

Requirements for a major in business : 24 hours exclusive of 231-232. 
The following courses are required: 353-3.54, 361, 362, 363, 473, and 4S3. 
Business majors must take nine hours of economics, including 221 and 222. 

In addition to these course requirements, each business major is expected 
to present evidence of having completed forty hours of approved, paid work 
experience. 

Credit for Business 231-232 and 353-354 is restricted to business majors. 

231-232. TYPEWRITING Credit, Six Hours 

Development of typewriting skill and its application to business letters, 
manuscriptt;, tabulation problems, and office forms. A rate of 50 words a 
minute is required. (Students who satisfactorily pass an examination given 
by the department, including the typing at the rate of 40 net words a minute, 
may enroll In Business 232 without having completed Business 231.) 

Mrs. Robinson 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 47 

353-354. ELEMENTAJRY SHORTHAND Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite or parallel : Business 231-232. 

Principles of Gregg Sliorthand ; development of skill to take dictation 

at 80 words a minute for five minutes on new material and produce acceptable 

transcripts. Mrs. Robinson 

361, 362. ACCOUNTING Credit, Six Hours 

Accounting for proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations ; classifi- 
cation of accounts ; analysis of financial statements ; payroll and tax problems. 

Miss Frazier 

363. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION AND REPORTS Credit, Three Hours 

Effective written and oral communication in business; composition of 

adjustment, credit, collection, and sales letters ; preparation of business 

reports. Miss Frazier 

375, 376. PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the history, policies, and methods of retail distribution; 

organization; store operation; control practices; personnel management; 

merchandising; advertising; and sales promotion. Miss Frazier 

377. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite : Mathematics 101. 
Fundamentals of statistics ; sources, collection, analysis, and Interpreta- 
tion of data ; and the use of statistical techniques. Mrs. Simmons 

381. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to legal principles applied to contracts, negotiable 
Instriunents, bailments, sales, property, insurance, torts, and bankruptcy. 

Miss itazier 

473, 474. ADVANCED SHORTHAND Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite : Business 35.3-354 or the equivalent. 
Review of shorthand theory, further development of dictation and tran- 
scription skill ; special attention to mailable transcripts. Mrs. Robinson 

483, 484. OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND PRACTICE Credit, Six Hours 
Prerequisite: Business 231-232. 
Principles of management applied to offices. Emphasis on office organi- 
zation ; personnel relations; aulomnlidn ; selection and proper use of office 
supplies and equipment; iiiclliods of tiling; operation of transcribing nincliines, 
duplicating machines, adding machines, and calculators. Miss Frazier 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

Ed. 386 B. THE TEACHING OP BUSINESS Credit, Three Hours 

See page 5-1. Miss Frazier 

402. WORK EXPERIENCE Credit, Three Hours 

Supervised cxjwrience In business offices two or three afternoons weekly. 

Conferences and remedial program for correction of deficiencies. For senior 

majors In luislueiss. Miss Frazier 



48 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

ECONOMICS 

Bequlrements for a major in economics : 24 hours in economics, including 
221 and 222. Economics 221 is a prerequisite to all other courses in economics. 

221 and 221S. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the principles underl.ving the current American economic 
system, including organization for production, money and banking, business 
cycles and individual prices, international trade, and distribution of income, 
with macro emphasis. Mrs. Simmons 

222. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

A continuation of 221, with micro emphasis to include an examination 
of the market, prices, costs, the production process, various forms of competi- 
tion in the theory of the firm, with detailed analysis of the factors of 
production. Mrs. Simmons 

355. ECONOMICS OP CONSUMPTION Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the management of personal and family finances, consumer 

buying practices, tax problems, purchasing guides and protections, and 

selling techniques. (Offered even-numbered years only) Mrs. Simmons 

365. LABOR ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 222. 
An analysis of American labor in a changing economic and social order; 
special emphasis upon trends in employment, labor organization, and standards 
In relation to technological change, state and federal labor legislation. 
(Offered odd-numbered years only) Mrs. Simmons 

366. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the development of international economic policies ; geographic, 

economic, social, and political factors underlying contemporary international 
problems ; foreign exchange and money floves ; economic competition ; and 
the economic and political methods employed by the leading commercial 
nations. (Offered odd-numbered years only.) Mrs. Simmons 

368. PUBLIC FINANCE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Economics 222. 
A study of the sources of revenue and the principles and methods of 
taxation and financial administration; fiscal policy; debt mamigem'ent; 
and the principles governing expenditures. (Offered even-numbered years 
only.) Mrs. Simmons 

375. PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit. Three Hours 

(See Business 375) 

377. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 101 
(See Business 377) 

381. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

(See Business 381) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 49 

385. MONEY AND BANKING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 222. 
An examination of tlie Talue and purchasing power of money; the role of 
commercial banks; the central banking system and its monetary controls; 
and the relationship between prices, production, employment, and economic 
growth. Special attention paid to current problems. Mrs. Simmons 



888. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Credit, Three Hours 

A critical analysis of the development of economic ideas, their origins 
and Institutional framework, with primary emphasis on an interpretative 
study of outstanding economists of the past whose contributions have 
significance for contemporary economic theory. Mrs. Simmons 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough, Professor 
Helen Jo Collins, Assistant Professor 

Requirements for a major in Chemistry : twenty-four semester hours 
trom courses in Chemistry exclusive of 101-102 and Ed. 385 Sc. or 386 Sc. 



CHEMISTRY 

101-102. GENERAL CHEMISTRY Credit, Six Hours 

An Introductory course in chemistry including qualitative analysis. 
Two class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Staff 



221, 222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four or Eight Hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. Three class hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 



861-362. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Credit, Eight Hours 

I'rerequlslte : Chemistry 101-102. Two class hours and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Mrs. Collins 



864. BIOCHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

I'n'requisltc : Chemistry 221. Tliree class hours and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week. Ml.>fs Yarbrough 



50 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

[356. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRX Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 221, 222. Three class hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 



Ed. 385 Sc. or 386 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours 
See page 55. Miss Yarbrough and Mr. Yarbrough 



491. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 351-352. Three class hours and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Mrs. Collins 



[494. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 221, 222; Chemistry 351, 352; Physics 
221-222; Mathematics 232, 351. Two class hours and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Mrs. Collins 



498. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

Open only to majors In Chemistry. 



PHYSICS 

[221-222. GENERAL PHYSICS Credit, Eight Hours] 

Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Miss Yarbrough 



364. HOUSEHOLD PHYSICS Credit, Three Hours 

Two class hours and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Miss Yarbrough 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 51 

EDUCATION 

David R. Reveley, Professor 
Harry K. Doraett, Associate Professor 

Lila Bell, Associate Professor 
Robert G. Fracker, Part-time Instructor 

All of the courses listed herein are designed primarily to prepare stndents 
who wish to teach In the public schools of the State. Students intending to 
teach should confer with the I>epartment of Education in their freshman or 
sophomore year and so plan their program of worlt as to be sure that they 
will meet the requirements for the State Class A certificate. All teaching 
programs must be approved by the head of the Department of Education. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

Students who expect to secure Class A certificates to teach In either 
the primary or the grammar grade level must meet the requirements listed 
below. 

/. Bulject-Matter Courses 

Semester Hoars 

Children's Llteraturel 2 

American Ilistory 6 

Geography 201 and 202 6 

PoUtlcal Science 2-3 

Art 6 

Music2 6 

Health Education 1-2 

Health Education MethodsS 2 

Physical Education Methods 2 

//. Professional Courses 

Area I— The Pupil 

Education 231 and 353 6 

Area II— The School 

Education 357 and a choice of 465, 491, 492 6 

Area HI — Teaching and Practicum 
Education 467 (4 hrs.) 
and 406 or 495S (6 hra.) 10 



>T1i« State Department of Public Instruction counts Children'* Literature as 

Engllnh, not as Education. 
■Students who completed Music Theory 101-102 should add Ed. 885 M. 
■The State Department recommeodB Biology 101-102 as a prerequisite. 



52 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

students who expect to secnre State Class A certificates to teach in high 
school, must meet the requirements listed below. It Is recommended that 
students be able to teach at least two subjects in the hi^h school. Majort, 
related subjects, and elevtives may 6e used to this end, but it should be nutM 
that the requirements for state certificates and the colhge requirements for 
majors do not always coincide. All teaching programs must be approved by 
the head of the Department of Education by the beginning of the junior 
year. 

/. Subject-Matter Courses 

A major and related courses should be selected from the following fielda 
(the number of semester hours required for a certificate Is indicated In 
parenthesis) : 

Art (30), commerce (36), English (30), French (24)1, German (24)1, 
history (social studies — 30), home economics (including certain sciences and 
other related courses) — (51), mathematics (21), public school music (including 
six semester hours in voice) — (36), science (30), sociology; social studies 
(30), Spanish (24)1. 

The following combinations are suggested : English-Latin, Bnglish-French- 
German, or Spanish, English-religion, history-mathematics, history-French- 
German, or Spanish, science-mathematics. 



//. Professional Courses 
Area I— The Pupil 

Education 231 and 456 6 semester hours 

Area II— The School 

Education 352 and choice of 465, 491, 492 6 semester houra 

Area III — Teaching and Practicum 

Education 385 or 386, and 495 or 495S 9 semester hours 

Note : Students are advised to take these courses in the following 
order : Education 231, 352, 385 or 386, 495. 



' The hours required In any torelgn langruage are based upon two units of high school 
work In that language. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 53 

EDUCATION COURSES 
Education 231 is prerequisite to all Education courses except 342. 

231, 231S. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

A course Intended to be basic to the others in the various sequencea 

which give direction to the professionally trained teacher. Mr. Reveley 

Mr. Fracker 

342F or 342. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

An intensive historical review of children's literature, both American 

and European. Miss Bell 
[BLOCK COURSE] 

352P or 352. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 357. 
The historical development, and a consideration of the place and function 
of secondary education in our democracy; the organization and administra- 
tion of the high school curriculum: methods of planning and teaching: 
qualifications of the high school teacher; student guidance; records and 
reports. 

Prerequisite to student teaching on the high school level. 

Mr. Dorsett Mr. Fracker 

353 or 353S. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 

Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite Ed. 231 or Psychology 221. 
A survey of the psychological development of the Individual through 
childhood. Mr. Dorsett 

357, 357S. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 352. 
The historical development of the elementary school; qualifications of 
the elementary teacher; the curriculum and co-currlcular activities; organi- 
zation and control; relation of teachers and pupils to one another; records 
and reports. Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

45eF, 456. MEASURING AND GUIDING ADOLESCENT REHAVIOR 

Credit, Three Hours 
A consideration of child and adolescent intelligence, aptitude, achieve- 
ment, Interest and personality tests used In the public schools, together with 
elementary statistical technl(iues involved in their application. 

Mr. I>or8ett 
[BLOCK COURSE] 

465. FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 

The movements of educational thought and institutions which gave rise 
to the American school systems. Mr. Reveley 

[BLOCK COURSE) 

467, 467S. ELEMENTARY METHODS Credit, Four Hours 

A study (if materials and mt-fhod* of teaching In all gubjecta at the 
elemenlnry school level. Kirected obaurvatlon ; units of work develoiied and 
evaluated. MLsa Bell 

[BU)CK COURiiE] 



64 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

491. SOCLAX. PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION Credit, Three Houra 
Present-day confusion In education due to conflicting philosophies as to 

alms and objectives, curriculum content, methods of learning and teaching, 
and the range of formal education. The responsibility of the school In rela- 
tion to guidance, vocational Interests, moral and character education, family 
life, and religion. Mr. Reveley 

492. PHILOSOPHY OP EDUCATION Credit, Three Houra 
A Study of the philosophical bases of modem education, with particular 

reference to the philosophies of idealism, realism, and pragmatism. 

Mr. Reveley 
Mr. Fraciier 

[BLOCK COURSE] 



SPECIAL METHODS COURSES 

Three semester hours of special methods In the field In which one Is 
planning to teach are expected for a high school certificate; six semester 
hours may be talfen by tliose who wish a certificate to teach in two fields. 
In special methods courses students are Introduced to aims, objectives, 
materials, and techniques of the teaching fields and levels of the State 
Course of Study. Lesson planning, practical demonstration, and actual 
observation of teaching of the various phases of the programs In the Raleigh 
City Schools and Walie County constitute a part of the courses. 

Prerequisite to all special methods courses : Education 231. 

38eA. THE TEACHING OF ART Credit, Three Hours 

(For description, see page 44) Mrs. Jeffries 

886B. THE TEACHING OP BUSINESS Credit, Three Hours 

Miss EYazier 

886E. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Rose 

386 M.L. THE TEACHING OF 'FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Credit, Three Hours 
Mr. McAllister 

882, 385 H. Ed. THE TEACHING OP HEALTH EDUCATION 

Credit, Two. Hours 
Mrs. Hood 

388. H. EC. THE TEACHING OP HOME ECONOMICS 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Hanyen 

385M. THE TEACHING OP MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Preston 

885, 386 Mus. THE TEACHING OF MUSIC Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Prerequisite : Theory 102. Required of juniors majoring in Public 
School Music. (For description see page 73) Miss Haeseler 

886 P. Ed. THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Credit, Two Hours 
Mrs. Massey 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 55 

885 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Yarbrough 

886 8. St THE TEACHING OF HISTORY AND SOCIAL STUDIES 

Credit, Three Hours 
Open to Juniors and seniors taking a major in history or sociology. 

Miss Lemmon 

OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACmNG 
495, 495S. STUDENT TEACHING Credit, SU Hours (either semester) 

The purjwse of this course Is to give the student actual teaching ex- 
perience. All student-teaching is on the block. Student-teachers will take 
advanced courses In education for the first nine weeks of the semester; 
during the last eight weeks they will be In the classroom for the entire 
day. The student will not take courses other than her courses In education 
during her semester of student-teaching. All high school student-teachers 
must have taken Education 231, Education 352, and Education .385 before the 
semester In which they do their student-tenchlng. All elementary student- 
teachers must have taken Education 231, Education 357, and Education 353 
before the semester In which they do their student-teaching. Tlie Depart- 
ment reserves the right to withhold the privilege of student-teaching if 
circumstances warrant. Staff 

(Fee $35) 

ENGLISH 

Mary Lynch Johnson, Professor 

Norma Rose, Professor 

lone Kemp Knight, Associate Professor 

Mamie Ilafner, Assistant Professor 

Velma Mae Gorsage, Instructor 

Dorothy Pope Greenwood, Instructor 

Elizabeth S. Chamberlain, Part-time Instructor 

English 101-102 prerequisite for English 221-222; English 221-222 pre- 
requisite for all other courses In English except 2:!3, .358 and Speech 221, 226. 

Requirements for a major: Thirty hours In English Including English 
101-102; English 221-222; twelve hours from English 351, 352. .353, .354. .S.W. 
494, 408; and six additional hours from English courses numbered above 300. 
No credit In the Department of English given for Education 385 E. History 
840 (English history) recommended to English majors. 

101-102, lOlS. PRINCIPLES OF WRITING Credit, Six Hoursl 

Staff 

221-222, 221S. DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Credit, Six Honm 
Staff 

233. CREATIVE WRITING Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Greenwood 

861. OLD ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Johnson 



' During lh« fa.Il ■emeatar on« aectlon will meet Are tlinefl n wa«k with thre* hour* 
oredit, to tak* cars of Uia needs of atudenta dellolent In fundamentals. 



56 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

352. CHAUCER Credit, Three Honrs 

Prerequisite : English 351. Miss Johnson 

353, 354. SHAKESPEARE Credit, Three or Six Honra 

Miss Rose 

365. MILTON Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Johnson 

357. AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 

CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Hafner 

358. ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Knight 

362. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Johnson 

[3&i. ENGLISH AND AMERICAN POETRY 

OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

Mrs. Greenwood 

365. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Knight 

368. ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 

CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Rose 

370. ENGLISH AND AMERICAN PROSE 

OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Greenwood 

Ed. 385 E. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

(See page 54) Miss Rose 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

4»4. THE TREATMENT OF LITERARY PROBLEMS Credit, One Hour 
Open only to majors in English. Miss Rose 

498. SEMINAR Credit, Three Hours 

Open only to majors In English. Miss Johnson 

SPEECH 

221. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Corsage 

226. ORAL INTERPRETATION Credit, Three Honrs 

Miss Corsage 

[351. RELIGIOUS DRAMA Credit, Three Hours] 

Miss Gorsage 

862. PLAY PRODUCTION Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Corsage 



COURSES' OF INSTRUCTION 57 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Quentin Oliver McAllister, Professor 

Susanne EL. Freund, Associate Professor 

Mary Eleanor Krummel, Assistant Professor 

William R. Ledford, Instructor 

P. A. Cline, Jr., Instructor 

Sharon E. Duncan, Instructor 

Courses numbered 101-102 and 221-222, or their equivalent, are pre- 
requisite for any course of higher number. 

Requirements for a major in French, Latin or Spanish : Twenty-four 
hours above 101-102, or eighteen hours above 221-222, including .''.51-,'{.52. 
Majors in French or Spanish must include .'i.')7 and 358. Latin majors are 
required to take a course in Ancient History. Foreign Language majors are 
nrged to include a second foreign language as a related field. 

In order to comply with new certification requirements, students who 
plan to teach French or Spanish must take the courses numbered 357 and 
358 In the language to be taught. Ed. 3S6 ML is required of students plan- 
ning to teach a foreign language, and counts as Education. 

FRENCH 

101-102. EJLEMENTART FRENCH Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the French language through analysis, contact, and use. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Credit, Six Hours 

Review of French grammar; Introduction of more difficult nspecta of the 

language; readings of appropriate difTlcultv ; practice In the oral and aural 

skills. Staff 

881-362. FRENCH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 
A survey of the development of French literature and the main currents 
of FVench thought from tlie beginnings to the contemporary period. 

Mr. McAllister 

[353. SEVENTEICNTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hoursl 

A literary study of the representatives of French cla.sstclsra In religious 

thought, plillosophy, and dnima, with some reference to their importance 

In the development of continental European civilization. Mrs. Freund 

[354. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

The period of the decline of absolutism, the rise of the bonrgeolRie, and 
the development of the rational spirit as shown In the literature of eighteenth- 
century France. Mrs. Freund 

[856. FRENCH ROMANTICISM Credit, Three Hoursl 

Mr. McAllister 

[366. FRENCH REALISM AND NATURALISM Credit, Tliree Hours] 

Mr. McAlIUter 



58 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

357. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVEBSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors In BVench. Sophomores admitted by permission only. 

Mr. McAllister 

858. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors in French. Sophomores admitted by permission only. 

Mr. McAllister 

361. MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE 18S0-1919 Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

362. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE, 

1919 TO THE PRESENT Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

492. PROBLEMS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Credit, 1-2 Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

493. DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURE OF THE 

FRENCH LANGUAGE Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the historical development of French from Latin. Reading of 

works in Old French. Some introduction, through French, to the general 

field of linguistics. 

Offered only when the demand is sufficient. Mr. McAllister 



GERMAN 

101-102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the German language through analysis, contact, and use. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Mrs. Freund 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Credit, Sbc Hours 

Review of German grammar; introduction of more difficult aspects of the 

language ; readings of appropriate difficulty ; practice In the oral and aural 

Bkills. 

German 358 may be substituted for German 222. Mrs. Freund 

861-352. GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the development of German Literature from the beginnings 
to the contemporary period. Extensive and intensive reading of signiflcant 
worlis. Lectures and reports in German. 

Offered only when the demand is sufficient. Mrs. Freund 

353, 354. FAUST; LYRIC POETRY OF THE 

19TH CENTURY Credit, One Hour Each Semester 

Mrs. Freund 

358. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN Credit, Three Hours 

Designed to meet the needs of students who are Interested esi>ecially In 

Bclentiflc work. Offered only upon demand. Mrs. B^eund 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

LATIN 

101-102. ELEMENTART LATIN Credit, Six Hours 

A course for beginners entailing the fundamentals of the language. Open 

to students who offer less than two units for entrance. Mr. CU&e 

221-222. VERGIL'S AENEID Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Two units of Latin for entrance or Latin 101-102. 

An Intermediate course in Jjatin designed to prepare the student for work 

with the more difficult authors. I'rimary considerations will be translation 

of the Aeneid and applied grammar and syntax. Mr. CUne 

351-352. ROMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 
Prerequisite: Four units of Latin and a satisfactory score at 
entrance, or Latin 221-222. 
A survey of Latin literature and civilization with emphasis on represen- 
tative writers. Translation of the prose of Llvy, Pliny, the poetry of Horace. 

Mr. CUne 

863-364. ROMAN COMEDY AND SATIRE Credit, Six Hoars 
Prerequisite: Latin 351-352. 

Translation of the plays of Plautus and Terence and the satires of 

Juvenal and Horace. Mr. Cline 

[365-366. ROMAN HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL WORKS 

Credit, Six Hours] 
Prerequisite: Latin 351-352. 

Translation of selections from Tacitus, Cicero, Suetonius. 



Mr. Cllne 



SPANISH 



101-102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the Spanish language through analysis, contact, and tise. 

Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Credit, Six Hours 

Review of ypanl.sh ;;ruiiiiiiar ; Introduction of more difficult aspects of 

the language ; readings of appropriate difficulty ; practice In the oral and aural 

skills. Staff 

[351-352. SPANISH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Credit, Six Hours] 

A study of the more Important works of Spanish literature, particularly 
as they reflect Spanish life and culture. 

Alternates with Spanish .353-354. Miss Krummel 

353-354. SPANISH-AMKRICAN LITERATURE AND 

CIV1I.1Z.VTION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of reprcsiiiditivo works of Spanish-American literature, particu- 
larly as they r('nt'<'t the lilslory and civilization of the nations concerned. 

Alternates with Spanish 351-352. Mr. Lcdford 

867. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Re<iulred of majors In Spanish. Sophomores admitted by permUalon only. 

Mr. Ledford 



60 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

858. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors in Spanish. Sophomores admitted by permis- 
sion only. Mr. Ledford 

491. CERVANTES AND THE GOLDEN AGE OF SPAIN 

Credit, Three Hours 
Open to juniors by special permission. Mr. Ledford 

492. MODERN SPANISH DRAMA Credit, Three Hours 

Open to seniors, and to others by special permission. 

Alternates with Spanish 494. Mr. Ledford 

[494. MODERN SPANIS.H NOVEL Credit, Three Hours] 

The modem Spanish novel, beginning with Feman Caballero. Open to 
seniors, and to others by special permission. 

Alternates with Spanish 492. Mr. Ledford 

Ed. 386 M.L. THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(See page 54.) Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Jay D. Massey, Assistant Professor 

Helena "W. Allen, Instructor 

Mary Mackay Edwards, Assistant in Equitation 

Virginia J. Hood, Instructor 

Frances W. Stevens, Part-time Instructor 

The program of the Department of Health and Physical Education Is 
designed to meet the needs of each individual student with respect to such 
problems as : 

1. The development and maintenance of a high degree of physical 
efficiency through a varied program of sports, rhythmic activities, and 
restricted physical education. 

2. The development of fundamental skills In those activities which will 
contribute to an intelligent use of leisure time. 

3. The provision of adequate opportunities for the development of qnall- 
tlee of leadership and cooperation through participation in the Intramural 
Program. 

4. The development of intelligent understanding of and a positive atti- 
tude toward personal health and hygiene in relation to daily living. 

All students enrolled In health and physical education are required to 
undergo physical examinations. Upon the basis of these examinations the 
College physician classifies each student for a physical education class 
!n vigorous activity, semi-vigorous activity, or restricted physical education. 
During orientation week aU freshmen are introduced to the facilities of 
the student health service by the College physician. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

101, 102. PERSONAL HYGIENE Credit, One Hour 

either semester 
Two hours a week for one semester. Required of freshmen. 

A fundamental course in the principles and problems of personal hygiene. 
The course Includes discussions based upon student health problems and 
Interests, and Instruction based upon health problems of college students. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

Ed. 382 H. Ed. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF HEALTH 
EDUCATION FOR THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL Credit, Three Hootb 

See page 54. 

Ed. 385 H. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF HEALTH 
EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM 
TEACHER Credit, Two Hour* 

Designed to furnish prospective elementary teachers with information 
and Ideas to be of help In planning, carrying out and evaluating classroom 
health instruction. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Students enrolled In activity courses In physical education are required 
to have reprulatlon gymnasium costumes for class. All freshmen and transfer 
students must purchase their uniforms during the first week of school from 
the Meredith Supply Store. 

First semester freshmen are limited to dance, team sports or equitation. 
Each semester thereafter students may choose from the variety of activities 
offered. 

Ill, 112. TEAM SPORTS : Beginning and Advanced Courses. 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Basketball 

Hockey 

Softball 

Speedball 

Volleyball 

221, 222. RHYTHMIC ACTIVITIES : Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced 
Courses. 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Modern Dance 

Folk and Square Dance 

223, 224. RESTRICTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Students classlfled for restricted physical education upon the recom- 
mendation of the College physician are enrolled In these courses. Each 
course is adapted to the needs of the indlviduiil student. In cases where 
student choices can be allowed, (Inal solcctlim will follow a conforoace 
with the head of the department. These activities are also open to students 
who are not on a restricted program. 

Archery Recreational Sports SUmnastlca 



62 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

251, 252. INDIVIDUAL SPORTS : Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced 
Courses. 

Two hours a week for each semester. 

Archery hife Saving 

Badminton Water Safety Instructor's Course 

Bowlingl Roller Skating 

Bqultationl Swedish Gymnastics 

Golfl Tennis 



382. COMMUNITY RECREATION AND CAMP LEADERSHIP 

Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the concept and theory of recreation and camping ; present-day 
trends in the light of their historical backgrounds; the organization of 
recreation centers, public and private camps ; principles and methods of 
planning, conducting, and evaluating these two programs. 

383, 384. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION FOR THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Six Hours 

A survey of the history and principles of physical education as related 
to a good program of physical education for the secondary school. A study 
of the activities as they relate to the needs of this age group, with experience 
In lesson planning and assisting with college classes. 

Ed. 386 P. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM TEACHER 

Credit, Two Hours 

Designed to help prospective elementary teachers to see and understand 
the place of physical education in the total educational system. Opportunities 
given for lesson planning and teaching the different types of activities for the 
various grade levels in elementary school. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Sarah McCulloh Lemmon, Professor 

Frank L. Grubbs, Jr., Assistant Professor 

Ricbard I>. Goff, Assistant Professor 

Thomas C. Parramore, Instructor 

Carolyn Barrington, Instructor 

Requirements for a major: thirty semester hours In history Including 
101-102; 251, 252; 330; 480; and 491-192. 

History 400 is given In the fall of odd-numbered years. 

Ed. 386 S. St counts as Education. 



» Special Fee. Paid at the time of re^stratlon for the class. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

HISTORY 

101-102. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF MODERN 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

First semester : from prehistory to the French Revolution ; second se- 
mester, from the French Revolution to the present. Introducing cultural and 
economic topics as well as historical. Staff 

I'rereqnisite to all other courses in history. 

251. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865 Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Goff, Mr. Grubbs, Miss Lemmon 

252. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865 

Credit, Three Honrs 
Mr. Goff, Mr. Grubbs, Miss Lemmon 

[270. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH Credit, Three Hours] 

From colonial times to the present. Mr. Goff 

SOL ANCIENT HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From prehistoric times to the fall of Rome. Miss Barrington 

802. MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the fall of Rome to the opening of the 16th century. 

Miss Barrington 

330. DIRECTED READING AND RESEARCH IN 

EUROPEAN OR FAR EASTERN HISTORY Credit, Two Hours 
Prerequisite : History 251, 252. Offered each semester. 
Required of all majors. Others admitted by special permission. 
Broad reading on a selected topic culminating in a research paper 
on some phase of the topic. Staff 

840. HISTORY OF ENGLAND SINCE 1560 Credit, Three Hours 

Social, economic, and political studies. Mr. Parramore 

841. EARLY MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the Commercial Revolution to the Congress of Vienna. 

Mr. Parramore 

842. MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. 

Mr. Parramore 

843. RECENT EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the outbreak of World War I to the present. 

Mr. Parramore 

848F. FAR EASTERN POLITICS AND CULTURE Credit, Two Hours 

China and Japan in modern times. Miss Barrington 

861. HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN COIX)NIES Credit, Three Hours 

To the Constitutional Convention. 
Prerequisite : History 251. Mr. Grubbs 

880. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED) STATES 

Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite: History 251, 262. Mr. Grubbs 



64 MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Ed, 386 S. St. THE TEACHING OF HISTORY AND 

SOCIAL STUDIES Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Lemmoa 

390. HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Lemmon 

[400F. SUPERVISED TRAINING IN ARCHIVES Credit, Three Hours] 

Open to juniors and seniors taking a major in history. Professional 
training in Archival Science, Museum Art, or Publications under 
the joint supervision of the North Carolina Department of Archives 
and History and the Meredith College Department of History. 
Practlcum required. 

444. CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Credit, One Hoar 
Prerequisite : History 343 or 12 hours in history. Miss Barrington 

451. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF 

THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1860 Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : History 251, 252. Miss Lemmon 

452. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES BEFORE 1860 Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 251, 252. Miss Lemmon 

[480. DIRECTED READING AND RESEARCH 

IN AMERICAN HISTORY Credit, Two Hours] 

Prerequisite : History 330. Offered each semester. 
Required of all majors. Others admitted by special permission. 
Broad reading on a selected topic culminating in a research paper 
for which primary sources have been consulted. Staff 

[491^92. Credit, One Hour] 

Prerequisite : 18 hours of history. 

Required of all majors. Meets bi-weekly both semesters. A con- 
sideiation of historiography and philosophies of history, both 
European and American. Staff 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

201. GOVERNMENT OP THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Grubbs 

202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN 

THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Grubbs 

301. POLITICAL PARTIES IN THE UNITED STATES 

Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite: Political Science 201 and History 252. Mr. Goff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Ellen Dozier Brewer, Professor 

Jennie M. Hanyen, Associate Professor 

Requirements for a major : Twenty-four semester hours of work In home 
economics above the freshman level. Students are advised to take Chemistry 
101-102 In the freshman year. 

Ed. 380 H. E. counts as Education. 

101. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Houra 

Two lectures and tour hours of laboratory. 

A study of clothing selection and appreciation. Elementary clothing 

construction. An analysis of fabrics to find the relation between cost and 

quality. Miss Hanyen 

104. 'FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 
Food selection and preparation. Miss Brewer 

223. FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

One lecture and five hours of laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 104, except by permission of the 
head of the department. 
A study of the principles and processes in the preparation and preserva- 
tion of food, and a consideration of the time and money values involved. 

Miss Brewer 

224. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 101. One lecture and five hours 
of latjoratory. 
Advanced clothing construction. Continuation of fabric analysis. 

Miss Hanyen 

851. NUTRITION Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 22\\, and Chemistry 101-102. Two 
lectures and two hours of laboratory. Miss Brewer 

852. ADVANCED FOODS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 223. Two lectures and four hours of 
laboratory. 

A course designed to apply the principles of nutrition and cookery to 
the planning, preiiaration, and service of meals of various types and costs, 
with special emphasis on consumer buying practices and tlieir relation to 
the food budget. Miss Brewer 

863. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 224. One lecture and five hours of 

laboratory. 

Tailoring. Use "f foundation pattern in designing. Identification and 

practical testing of miiterlals. Miss Hanyen 

[354. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours] 

rrereqiilsite : Home Economics 353. One lecture and five hours of 
hilxiriitory. 

Alleruutes with 308. 
Applied costume designing. Problems draped on the dress form. 

Miss Hanyen 



66 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

356. CHILD DEVELOPMENT AJO) HOME NURSING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the physical care and the development of the child from the 

pre-natal period through Infancy. Principles of nursing as applied to the 

home care of the sick. Miss Hanyen 

358. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Elective for juniors and seniors not majoring in home economics. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 
A survey of personal clothing problems to include the basic principles of 
selection, construction, and renovation of garments ; the use of commercial 
patterns, and a knowledge of textiles from the standpoint of the consumer. 

Alternates with 354. Miss Hanyen 

359, 359S. FOOD SELECTION AND PREPARATION Credit, Three Hours 

Elective for juniors and seniors in all courses. Two lectures and 
four hours of laboratory. 
A brief course in food selection, preparation and service, planned for 
students majoring in other fields. Miss Brewer 

362. DIET THERAPY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Home Economies 351 and Chemistry 221. Two lectures 

and two hours of laboratory. 

A continuation of Home Economics 351 with emphasis on special dietary 

problems. Miss Brewer 

364. HOUSE PLANNING AND FURNISHING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the house plan from the standpoint of convenience and artistic 
effect. The selection of household furnishings and arrangements of interiors 
with special emphasis on economic factors. 
Alternates with Art 362. 

Ed. 386 H. Ec. METHODS OF TEACHING HOME 

ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

See page 54. Miss Hanyen 

389. HOME MANAGEMENT Credit, Three Hours 

The application of scientific principles to the problems of the modem 
homemaker; an evaluation of home equipment, Its choice, care, and use. 

Miss Brewer 

491. ECONOMICS OF THE HOME Credit, One Hour 

Open to seniors taking a major in home economics and to Juniors by 

permission. Prerequisite or parallel : Home Economics 389. Miss Hanyen 

493 or 493S. ECONOMICS OF THE HOME— RESIDENCE 

Credit, Two Hours 
To be taken in connection with Home Economics 491. 
Residence for students in groups in the home management house. 

Miss Hanyen 



COURSES OF INTRUCTION 67 



MATHEMATICS 

Ernest F. Canaday, Professor 

Dorothy K. Preston, Instructor 

Geneva L. Martin, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major; Twenty-one semester hours above 101 and 
102. Ed. 385 M. counts as education. 

Topics recommended for teachers by the State Board of Education are 
incorporated into courses 101 and 102. 

101, lOlS. COLLEGE ALGEBRA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : two units in algebra. 

102. TRIGONOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : two units in algebra and one in plane geometry. 

221. PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : 101 and 102. A few freshmen having three units In 
alRebra and a course in trigonometry and scoring over 550 on the 
CoUege Board Mathematics test and making a good score on a 
test given at Meredith at the beginning of the year may be ad- 
mitted, without 101, 102. 

222. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY OF SPACE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : 221. 

232. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 221. 

36L INTEGRAL CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 232. 

852. ADVANCED CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 351. 

353. THEORY OF EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 221. 

856. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 232 and parallel with course 351. 

305. MODERN ALGEBRA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : 101. 

457. MODERN COLLEGE GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 101 and 102. 

Ed. 885 M. METHODS OP TEACHING SECONDARY 

MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours 



68 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

MUSIC 

Harry E. Cooper, Professor 

Stuart Pratt, Professor 

Beatrice Donley, Associate Professor 

Edwin K. Blanchard, Assistant Professor 

Phyllis Weyer Garriss, Assistant Professor 

James L. Clyburn, Assistant Professor 

Isabelle Haeseler, Instructor 

Stephen E. Young, Instructor 

The courses in the Department of Music fall into several principal groups, 
namely : courses in history and appreciation designed primarily as cultural 
courses for students not specializing in music ; courses In teaching methods 
designed to prepare for work as a teacher of music (in the public schools 
or as a private teacher) ; courses in theory and composition designed to 
furnish a solid background for the understanding and Intepretatlon of the 
greatest music as well as to develop to the fullest the creative ability of 
the individual : courses in singing and playing leading to artistic performance; 
and courses leading to a major in church music. 

Students who wish to major in any branch of music must demonstrate 
to the satisfaction of the head of the department that their talent and 
previous training are such that they are qualified to carry on the work In a 
satisfactory manner. 

Students who cannot meet all the entrance requirements of the college 
and the department may take work in applied music, but will not receive 
credit for such work. 

For Music majors applied music must be validated by equal credit (with 
C or better) in courses selected from the following: Theory, History and 
Literature, Music Education and Ensemble, subject to quantitative restrictions 
stated elsewhere in the catalogue. 



MUSIC MAJORS MUST COMPLETE AT LEAST SIXTY 
SEMESTER HOURS IN NOIST-MUSIC SUBJECTS- 

Major in Applied Music (piano, organ, violin, or voice) for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts : 

Applied music major 24 hours 

Electives in applied music and ensemble 6 hours 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

History of Music 36.3, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Electives in Theory, History and Literature, Music 

Education, and Ensemble 6 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

Major In Music Education for the degree of Bachelor of Arts : 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Methods 385, 3S61 hours 

Wind Instruments 365, 366 2 hours 

String Instruments 367, 368 2 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Piano and voice2 

Major in Church Music for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts : 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Church Music 3S7, 388 6 hours 

Field worls in Church Music 493 3 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Applied Music 24 hours 

Minimum of 6 hours each in piano, organ, and voice 
(12 hours in oue of these) 

Religion 247 or 369 3 hours 

Religion 351 or 356 3 hours 

Majors in church music, organ, public school music, violin, and voice 
must complete Piano 101 with a satisfactory grade. 

Majors in public siliool music and church music are expected to appear 
in one public recital above the level of the student recital. 

Majors in organ should elect: Counterpoint, four semester hours (junior 
year) ; and Canon and Fu^ue, two souiester hours (senior year). 

A senior recital and a partial junior recital is required of all majors In 
applied music. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 

MUSIC 

Students who hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or P.achelor of Science 
win be granted the degree of Bachelor of Mu.slc on meeting the following 
requirements : 

1. Present a total of 45 hours In applied music, at least 36 hours of 
which must be in one iiiajnr Held of aiipliod music, and give a recital which, 
In the opinion of the faculty, Is worthy of the degree. 



> Six hours toward the certificate reciulrcments (soe p. 52). 

• PInno and voice must be Rtudlod until. In Hie opinion of the faculty, a ronsonabl* 
proficiency hnn been reached. 



70 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

2. Complete all theory courses in the following list which have not 
already been completed : 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

Music history 363, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Counterpoint 351, 352 4 hours 

Canon and Fugue 498 2 hours 

Composition 491 3 hours 

Development of Symphony 401 2 hours 

Orchestration 494 2 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Survey of Chamber Music 402 2 hours 

Students may elect additional courses In any department if time permits, 
but will not be required to carry more hours than necessary to meet these 
minimum requirements. 

EQUIPMENT 

Six grand pianos, twenty-one upright pianos, a three-manual organ, two 
two-manual organs and numerous orchestral instruments furnish thorough 
equipment for effective teaching. 

STUDENT RECITALS 

student recitals are held bi-weekly, at which all music students are 
required to be present, and in which they are required to take part when 
requested to do so by their teachers. 

Freshmen and sophomores majoring in piano, organ, voice, or violin will 
appear in recital at least once each semester, except that freshmen may 
be excused the first semester. Juniors will be heard at least twice each 
semester, and seniors at the discretion of their major professors. 

CONCERTS 

The College appropriates funds to provide opportunities for the students 
to hear good music. The Raleigh Concert Music Association brings a number 
of orchestras and artists to Raleigh each season. Concerts given b.v the 
Raleigh Oratorio Society, the Chamber Music Guild and other local organiza- 
tions are also open to students. Members of the faculty of the Department 
of Music are active as recitalists, and the faculty concerts given throughout 
the year include works from all schools of composition. 

THEORY 

101, 102. THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Theory 101 before 102. Each Semester 

Required of freshmen majoring in music 

Elementary harmony with special emphasis on primary and secondary 
triads and Dominant Seventh chords. Correlative studies in sightsinging, 
dictation, keyboard harmony, and harmonic analysis. 

Miss Haeseler 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 71 

221, 222. THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Theory 102 before 221 and Each Semester 

221 before 222. 

Required of sophomores majoring in music. 
A continuation of Theory 101, 102. Review of harmonic practice followed 
by a 8tudy of modulations, seventh chords, chromatic alterations as exemplified 
In the works of the major Baroque, classic and romantic composers. 

Mr. Young 

233. MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS Credit, Three Hours 

The student will .study pitch, scales, keys, and key signatures, rhythm and 
time signatures, rhythmic reading and elementary chords and their functions. 
There will be included melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation, and baste 
keyboard harmony. Not open to students who have completed Theory 101, 102. 
[BLOCK COURSE] Mr. Blanchard 

861, 352. COUNTERPOINT Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 222 before 351 and Each Semester 

361 tefore 352. 
Required of juniors majoring In organ. 

Strict counterpoint in all five species and a study of the medieval modes. 

Mr. Young 

863, 364. FORM AND ANALYSIS Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 222 before 353 and Each Semester 

353 before 354. 

Required of juniors majoring in music. 
An explanation of design and structure in all types of homophonlc 
music. The phrase, period, song-forms carried through to the sonata. 

Mr. Cooper 

491. COMPOSITION Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisites: Counterpoint 352, Form and Analysis 354. 
Composition In various forms for voice, chorus. Individual instruments, 
and combinations of instruments, followed largely by the inclination of tho 
student. 

Mrs. Garriss 

494. ORCHESTRATION Credit, Two Hoars 

Prerequisites: Theory 222, Counterpoint 352. 
A study of the instruments of the orchestra. Arranging music for various 
groups of instruments and for full orchestras. 

Mrs. Garriss 

498. CANON AND FUGUE Credit, Two Hours 

PrtTCMiulsIte : Counterpoint .352. 
Reiiuln-d of seniors majoring In organ. 

A course toudilng uimn all the complex devices of Involved polyphonic 
music. Double, triple, and quadrui>le counterpoint. 

Mr. Cooper 



72 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

226. APPRECIATION OF MUSIC Credit, Three Honra 

A course adapted to tlie neods of the general college student who wishes 
to obtain an understanding of music as an element of liberal culture and to 
derelop the power of listening intelligently. No technical knowledge required- 
Not open to music majors. 

Mrs. GarrisB 
Mr. Blanchard 

863, 364. THE HISTORY OF MUSIC Credit, Three Honrs 

Prerequisites : EngUsh 102, History 102, and Each Semester 
Music Theory 102. 

Required of students majoring In music. 
The development of musical art from ancient times to the present. 
The study of music as literature, through the analysis of masterworljs. 
[BLOCK COURSE] Mr. Young 

387, 388. CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three HourB 

Prerequisite: Theory 101, 102 Each Semester 

A course dealing with all phases of music in the Protestant church. 
Organization and administration of adult and children's choirs, with ex- 
tensive survey of anthems and other materials. Study of hymns and their 
use, and consideration of the ministry of music as an aid to worship. 

Mr. Young 

401. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYMPHONY Credit, Two Houra 

Prerequisite: Music History 3G4 or Music Aiipreciation 226. 

The history of the symphony, with a detailed study of several works 
and sufficient hearing of about a dozen outstanding works so that the student 
becomes familiar with them. The styles of different composers and the 
development of orchestration emphasized. The writing of a research paper 
of small thesis proportions based primarily on the study of scores and 
recordings used in the course. 

Mrs. GarrisB 

402. SURVEY OF CHAMBER MUSIC LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite : Music History 3G4 or Music Appreciation 226. - 

The history of chamber music emphasizing the forms and styles of 
various periods and composers. Student-faculty performances of chamber 
works whenever iiossible. Score-study and recordings of about fifteen out- 
standing chamber works so that the student becomes very familiar with them. 

Mrs. Garriss 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

234. GRADED MATERIALS AND METHODS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite : Music Fundamentals 2.33 or 
permission of the department. 

This course is recommended for all prospective teachers at the elementary 
level, especially those preparing to teach in North Carolina. Designed to 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 

lead the primary education teacher toward an understanding of the presenta- 
tion of 8lnging, rhythmic, Instrumental, listening, and creative activities to 
the child In grades one through six, the course is presented through a 
sequence of related activities. Not open to students who have completed Ed. 
385 Mus. 

[BLOCK COURSE] Miss Haeseler 

357. THE TEACHING OF THE PIANO Credit, Three Hours 

Methods of teaching children notation, piano technique, elements of 
theory, rhythm, and ear training, VFlth a systematic study of material suitable 
for beginners of all ages, as well as more advanced students. A survey of 
piano literature. 

Mr. Clybum 

SOI. THE TEACHING OF STRING INSTRUMENTS Credit, Three Hours 

A short resume of the history of string instruments, their construction 
and literature. Methods of teaching children notation, elements of theory, 
ear-training, left-hand technique, bowing technique ; good tone production ; 
systematic study of material for pupils of all grades of advancement. 

Mrs. Garrlss 

365, 366. WIND AND PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS Credit, One Hour 
Required of majors In public school music. Each Semester 

A practical study of the technique of two brass instruments, one wood- 
wind, and one percussion instrument. 

Mrs. Garriss 

867, .363. STRING INSTRUMENTS Credit. One Hour 

Required of majors in public school music. Each Semester 

A practical study of string Instruments with emphasis on violin. 

Mrs. Garriss 

Ed. 385 Mus. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 

TEACHING MUSIC IN THE GItADES Credit, Three Hours 

I'rerequisite: Theory 102. Required of juniors 
majoring in public school music. 

A study of the various texts in use in the elementary grades, the use 
of songs and dances, rliytliniic studies for children. Planning the work In 
the classroom and for tlie year; methods of interesting cliildren In music. 
Selection and presentation of rote song; the child voice in singing; the 
unmusical child; introduction of staff notation and the beginning of music 
reading; directed listening. 

Miss Haeseler 

Bd. 380 Mus. MATERIALS ANI> METHODS OF 

TEACIIINO MUSIC IN THE HIGH SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 
I'rere(|ulsite : Theory 102. Required of juniors 
majoring In pul)lic school music. 
A study of the texts In use In the junior and senior high school. The 
adolescent voice and Its care; testing and classlllcatlon of voices. The orgnnl- 
lation and conduct of a high school department of music. Songs and texts 
suitable for high school use. 

Miss Haeseler 



74 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

493. FIELD WORK IN CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

495a. OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING 

IN APPLIED MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

The work to be done in connection with Theory 357 or 361, under the 

direction of the professor giving such course. In some cases a limited amount 

of this credit allowed toward the requirement in directed teaching for the 

certificate. 

Prerequisites: Education and Music 357. Mr. Clybum 

495, 495S. OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING Credit, Three or 
IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS Six Hours Either 

Semester 
See Education, page 55. 
Prerequisites: Education 231, 352; Ed. 385, 386 Music. 

Miss Haeseler 

497. CONDUCTING Credit, Two Hours 

Required of students majoring In public school 
music and church music. 
Class meets three times weekly. 
Essentials in conducting, baton technique. Practical experience In 
conducting in the college chorus. 

Mr. Blanchard 

ENSEMBLE 

869, 370. ENSEMBLE PLAYING Credit, Two Hours 

Each Semester 
A study of the standard ensemble literature ; open to all qualified students 
by arrangement with members of the faculty. Staff 

CHORUS Credit, One Hour 

Each Semester 

Two semesters required for all students majoring in music. Non-majors 
admitted on basis of auditions held at beginning of each semester. The 
Chorus as a whole, and groups selected from it, provide music for various 
college functions and give concerts on and off the campus. Attendance at 
three one-hour rehearsals each week and at all performances required. 

Miss Donley 

ORCHESTRA CrecUt, One-half Hour 

Each Semester 
An opportunity given to students to play in an orchestra, to hear their 
own arrangements performed, and to gain experience in conducting. 

Mrs. Garriss 

APPLIED MUSIC 

students in the music department who wish to take part in public 
programs should consult with their respective teachers and the head of the 
Department of Music in advance. 

All courses iu applied music require three hours practice per week for 
each seme.ster hour credit; for every three semester hours credit, or fraction 
thereof, a student must take not less than one lesson a week, of at least a 
half-hour duration, throughout the semester. No student Is permitted to 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 75 

take more than eight semester hours of applied music In any one semester. 
The worlc In applied music is adjusted to suit the needs of each Individual 
student, but In general follows the outUne of the following courses : 



PIANO 

Mr. Pratt, Mr. Clyburn, Miss Haeseler 

The materials used for technical development are variable, depending on 
the concepts of the teacher, and the individual needs of the pupil. A thorough 
knowledge of all scales and arpeggios should be established before a pupil 
enters Piano 101. 

101, 102. FRESHMAN PIANO 

Bach Invaitiang, Preludes, Suites; Sonatas of the difficulty of the Haydn 
In D major, Mozart F major (K. 3.32), and Beethoven Op. 14, No. 2; the 
easier Chopin Preludes, VaUies, Mazurkas, Nocturnes; other classical, ro- 
mantic, and contemporary composers. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE PIANO 

Bach Three-Part Inventions, Well-Tempered Clavier, Suites, Partitas; 
Mozart and Beethoven Sonatas; Chopin works of moderate difficulty; other 
classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

851, 352. JUNIOR PIANO 

Bach Well-Tempered Clavier, Toccatas, Partitas, etc.; Mozart and Beetho- 
ven Sonatas; Chopin Etudes, Impromptun, Schcrzi; Ballades; etc.; other 
classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary composers. 

491, 492. SENIOR PIANO 

Bach Wrll-Tr-mpered Plavier, Chorale-Preludes, and larger works; Beetho- 
ven Sonatas of greater difficulty; Concrrti; Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, 
and Ravel works suitable for senior recital; other classical, romantic. Im- 
pressionistic, and contemporary composers. 



ORGAN 

Mr. Cooper, Miss Haeseler, Mr. Young 
101, 102. FRESHMAN OROAN 

Manual arid pi-dal tfH-hnique ; I'.aoh Elpht Short Preludis and Fugues; 
short pieces involving the fundamentjila of registration and use of the 
expression pedals; hymn playing. Students beginning organ us'mlly take 
baLf their work in organ and half In piano. 

221. 222. SOPHOMORE ORGAN 

Bach Prrludr.H and I'ugucs of the first master period. Choral Preludes; 
sonata.s by (Jiillmant, Mendelssohn; simpler works of the modern schools; 
accompanying. 

851, 352. JUNIOR ORGAN 

Bach, smaller worlis of the mature master period, selected movements 
from the Trio Sonnlas and Conicrtos; sonatas by Oullmant, Mendelssohn, 
Rhelnborger, and others; pieces by classic and modern composers; service 
playing. 



76 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

491, 492. SENIOR ORGAN 

Bach, larger works of the mature master period; compositions of Franck; 
symphonies of Widor, Vierne ; compositions of the modern French, English, 
German, and American Schools. 

VIOLIN 

Mrs. Garriss 

101, 102. FRESHMAN VIOLIN 

Thorough study of bowing and left-hnnd technique; Laoureux Etudes, Bk. 
II; Mazas Op. 36; concertos by De P.eriot and Accolay; sonatinas by 

Schubert. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE VIOLIN 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves ; Mazas Etudes Spedales, Kreutzer 
Etudes; sonatas of Corelli and Handel; concertos by Rode, Viotti, and 
Kreutzer. 

351, 352. JUNIOR VIOLIN 

Technical work continued ; etudes by Kreutzer and PioriUo ; sonatas by 
Mozart and Beethoven ; concertos by Viotti, Kreutzer, and Mozart. 

491, 492. SENIOR VIOLIN 

Scales in thirds and octaves ; etudes by Rode and Gavlnies ; concertos by 
Vieuxtemps, Wieniawski, Godard, and others; sonatas by Bach, Tartini, and 
Beethoven. 

OECHESTRAL IN"STRUMENTS 
Courses In viola, flute, and other orchestral Instruments will in some 
cases be offered on request, when qualified instruction is available by mem- 
bers of the departmental faculty. Credit will he given on the same basis as 
with other applied music. 

VOICE 

Miss Donley, Mr. Blanchard 

101, 102. FRESHMAN VOICE 

Position and poise of the body, strengthening exercises for the vocal 
mechanism, supplemented by technical exercises with musical figures for 
the development of vocal freedom. Simpler songs from classical literature. 
English and Italian pronunciation. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE VOICE 

Technical work of the freshman year continued ; scales and staccato 
exercises. Moderately difficult songs by composers of romantic, and con- 
temporary literature. French and German pronunciation. 

351, 352. JUNIOR VOICE 

More advanced technique and vocalizations. Advanced literature. In- 
troduction of oratorio and operatic repertoire. 

491, 492. SENIOR VOICE 

Technical work continued, stressing flexibility. Total repertoiy should 
include four arias from operatic literature ; four arias from oratorio litera- 
ture; twenty songs from the classic and romantic literature; twenty songs 
from modern literature. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

Ethel Tilley, Professor 

Requirements for a major : Twenty-four hours In the Department with at 
least eighteen hours in Psychology. 

PSYCHOLOGY 
Psychology 221 Is a prerequisite for all other courses In Psychology. 

221. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An Introduction to the methotls of science and to psychology as a science 
of human beliavior : heredity, environment ; sensation, perception ; emotions, 
motives, adjustments to conflicts and frustrations ; intelligence, learning, 
remembering and forgetting, thinking ; observing and reporting ; individual 
aptitudes. 

222. GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to the chief methods of laboratory psychology. Individual 
and group experiments in reflexes, animal and human learning, remembering, 
emotions, sensation, perception, imagery, illusions, fatigue, observing and 
reporting, and development of individual and group attitudes. Two class 
hours and one three-hour laboratory period weekly. 

[232. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT Credit, Three Hours] 

(1) Personal adjustment of normal people; (2) mental health. Offered 
in alternate years. 

85L PSYCHOLOGY OF ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR Credit, Three Hours 

(1) A brief history of the treatment of the mentally 111; (2) mild mental 
disorders and slight maladjustments to social living; (.S) syndromes of 
psyclioses as they are classified today; (4) modem methods in dlagnosla, 
treatment, and prevention of mental illness. 

355. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

(1) Communication among human beings; (2) differences and likenesses 
In social giou[)8 ; (3) the individual as a member of groups; (4) meeting 
problems of social living, such as competition for niutcrinl goods, war. 
prejudice, and changing customs in marriage and family life. Offered in 
alternate years. 

[357. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours] 

A study of the practical applications of psychology in personal develop- 
ment and social relations; in buslnesis, industry, and professions; In clinics. 
Each student will add to her general study an Individual investigation In a 
field of her Interest. Offered in alternate years. 

358. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY Credit, Three flours 

(1 1 The development and functioning of normal personality; (2( tboorlt* 
of defining, assessing, and Interpreting personality. Offered In alternate 
yeara. 



78 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

498. DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY AND 

FIELDS OF PSYCHOLOGY Credit, One to Three Hours 

Offered on demand. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 223 or 224 is a prerequisite for all other courses in Philosophy, 
except by special permission. 

223. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours 

A student-developed course. The method differs from year to year. 
Lectures, discussions, student reports on materials chosen by the reporters. 

[224. LOGIC Credit, Three Hours] 

(1) Clearness in the use of words; (2) deductive logic; (3) inductive 

logic; (4) a brief introduction to symbolic logic. Offered in alternate years. 

[352. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours] 

From Thales to Thomas Aquinas. Offered in alternate years. 

354. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours 

From the revolt against scholasticism to the present day. Offered in 
alternate years. 

364. PLATO Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the Dialogues and of Platonic Influence on western philosophy. 
Offered in alternate years. 

RELIGION 

Ralph E. McLain, Professor 

Roger H. Crook, Professor 

Bernard H. Cochran, Assistant Professor 

J. Henry Coffer, Jr., Instructor 

Requirements for a major : Twenty-four hours including 101, 102. 

101, 102. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE OLD AND NEW 

TESTAMENTS Credit, Six Hours 

Staff 
A study of the central meaning of the Bible. 

247. WORLD-WIDE CHRISTIANITY Credit, Three Hours 

The world mission of the Christian religion as it confronts our 
age. Mr. McLain 

248. THE RELIGIONS OF MANKIND Credit, Three Hours 

A survey and analysis of the great religions of the world. 

Mr. McLain 

265. THE PROPHETIC ELEMENT IN RELIGION Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the nature and function of the prophet in any age, 
with major attention given to a study of the prophetic books of 
the Old Testament. Mr. Crook 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 7» 

268. PAULINE LITERATURE Credit, Three Hours 

The development of early Christianity as found in the work and 
writings of Paul. Mr. Crook 

361. LEADERSHIP IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
The principles and techniques of Christian leadership. 

Mr. Coffer 

353. THE COURSE OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS Credit, Three Hours 

The expansion of Christianity in its world mission from the first 
century to the present. Mr. Cochran 

355. THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the great literary expression in the Bible, with an 
intensive study of Joi, Psalms, and other Wisdom writings together 
with a study of the theology of contemporary literature. 

Mr. Coffer, Mr. IklcLain 

386. THE LOCAL CHURCH PROGRAM Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the specific elements in developing an effective program. 

Mr. Coffer 

361. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the development of Christian thought and institutions 
from the first century to the modern period. Mr. Cochraa 

[362. BAPTIST HISTORY AND BELIEFS' Credit, Three Hours] 

A study of the development and distinctive contributions of the 
Baptist people. Mr. Cochran 

364. EELIGION IN AMERICA Credit, Three Hours 

An historical study from American beginnings to the contemporary 
scene. Mr. Cochran 

369. FOUNDATIONS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT Credit, Three Hours 
The nature and function of science, philosophy, and religion to- 
gether with an analysis of the major problems Involved in 
Christian thought. Mr. McLain, Mr. Cochran 

870. CHRISTIAN ETHICS Credit, Three Hours 

The province, presuppositions, and ideal of the Christian ethic 
and its meaning for specific problems in our day. Mr. Crook 

872. PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGIOUS LIVING Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the results of psychological analysis of religious ex- 
periences with a view to understanding better the work of (.'hristlan 
coun>;eling. Mr. Coffer 

Prerequisite : Education 31 or Psychology 21. 

388. TRENDS IN CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN 

'illUUCIIT Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Religion 217 and cither Philosophy 223 or Religion 

309 or other adequate prerequisite approved by chairman of the 

department. 

An analytical survey of trends in contemporary Christian thought 

and leadership. Mr. McLain 



80 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

SOCIOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Leslie W. Syron, Professor 

Preston D. Parsons, Assistant Professor 

Vergean R. Birkin, Instructor 

Sociology 221 is a prerequisite for all other courses in sociology. 

RpQuirements for a major in sociology : Twenty-four hours in sociology 
including 221, 222, and 499, or their equivalents. 

221 or 221S. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

A g<>neral introduction to the field of sociology with emphasis upon 

culture, collective behavior, inter-group relations, community, institutions, 

and social change. Staff 

222. SOCIAL PROBLEMS Credit, Three Hours 

An analysis of some of the major problems of personal and social dis- 
organization in contemporary society with emphasis upon causes, treatment, 
and prevention. Staff 

351. AMERICAN MINORITY PEOPLES Credit, Three Hours 

A study of present day racial and cultural minorities with emphasis 
upon scientific facts about race and on changing attitudes and policies. 

Mr. Parsons 

352. CRIMINOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 
An analysis of the nature and extent of criminal behavior, factors 

which seem to be related to such behavior, and changing attitudes toward 
the criminal and crime control. Mr. Parsons 

363. THE COMMUNITY Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the structure and function of rural and urban communities, 
their institutions and problems. Mr. Parsons 

306. REGIONAL SOCIOLOGY OP THE SOUTH Credit, Three Hours 

A brief survey of the development of ecological, economic, and cultural 
patterns iu the southeastern states; comparison with other regions. 

Miss Syron 

371. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to anthropology with special emphasis on comparative 
study of preliterate and simpler cultures. Miss Syron 

372. COMPARATIVE CULTURES Credit, Three Hours 

A study of selected areas throughout the world with special emphasis on 
the rapid modernization of undeveloped areas. Miss Syron 

374, 374F. THE FAMILY Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the origin and structure of the family and its functions as the 
basic institution of society ; an analysis of contemporary marriage and 
family expcritnce with emphasis on necessary adjustments, resources and 
values. Mr. Parsons 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

37& INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL RESEARCH Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the general field of sociological research ; methods of develojv 
Ing studies and analyzing sociological data. Miss Syron 

494. DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY Credit, One-Three Hours 

Research and study in a special field outside the regular departmental 
ofTerlngs. Open by permission of the head of the department to senior 
major students. Miss Syron 

407. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK Credit, Three Hours 

A pre-professional course to introduce the student to the field of social 
work ; directed activity in outside agencies. Miss Syron 

499. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the history of social thought from ancient times to the 
present, with particular emphasis on contemporary sociological thought. 

Miss Syron 



GEOGEAPHY 

201 or 201S. ELEMENTS OF PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

Credit, Three Hours 

An Introductory survey of man's physical environment, analyzing on a 

world-wide basis both the elemi^nts of weather and climate and the origin 

and reshaping of major landforms. Mr. Birkln 

202. WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Geography 201 or permission of the departments 

concernetl. 

A systematic survey of the major world regions with regard to culture, 

natural resources, economies, and political ties, and their future position 

in world trade. Mr. Birkln 

231. CONSERVATION OF NATUR.\L RESOURCES Credit, Three Hours 
An introductory survey of the use and abuse of soils, minerals, water, 
forests, public lands, and recreational areas, with euiiihasis on the ever- 
growing problem of preservation for future senerations. Mr. Birkln 

302. ANGLO-AMERICA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Geography 201 or itormission of the departments 

concerned. 

A detailed analysis of homogeneous regions of the United States and 

Canada, with regard to climate, physiography, and ecouoinles, and in relation 

to the western world. Mr. Birkln 



DEGREES CONEERUED IN 1963 

Bachelor of Arts 

Allen, Barbara Blanchard Raleigh 

Armstrong, Mary Devericks Charlotte 

Armstrong, Ruth Fisher Charlotte 

Arrington, Lynda Jean Copley Raleigh 

Atkins, Delores Leslie Durham 

Avery, Judith Leigh — Cum Laude Envin 

Baker, Norma Louise Lexington 

Baker, Sarah Jean Fallstort 

Ballou, Martha Manly — Cum Laude Leesburg, Florida 

Barbee, Billie Rebecca Parker Pollocksville 

Barbae, Clabron Ann Morrisville 

Barlowe, Harriet Bruce Dodd Wake Forest 

Barnhardt, Ann Drucilla Concord 

Baxter, Linda Carole Bobbins 

Bibb, jerrie Preston Raleigh 

Blalock, Linda Willene Hamrick ; Raleigh 

Blanton, Norma Hamrick Kings Mountairt 

Boone, Helen Pauline Raleigh 

Bozart, Bryna Barrett Raleigh 

Branch, Laura Wytol Enfield 

Brantley, Joan LaRue — Cum Laude Selma 

Browning, Virginia Bridgers Raleigh 

BufFaloe, Edna Edmundson Raleigh 

Bullard, Elizabeth Earle LumbertorT 

Bunn, Brenda Frances — Cum Laude Zebulon 

Burgess, Jeanne Smith Elizabethtown 

Carver, Mary Frances Roanoke Rapids 

Clark, Brenda Carole Virgilina, Virginia 

Cooper, Sylvia Annette Aberdeen 

Dail, Nancy Elizabeth Mt. Olive 

Daniel, Helert Finch Elm City 

Davenport, Berma Jean Fayetteville 

Davenport, Katherine Gene Pactnlus 

Davis, Mary Louise Sanford 

Dellinger, Donna Louise Yancey Gastonia 

Elliott, Martha Theresa Raleigh 

Fahmy, Salwa Abdel Aziz Alexandria. Egynt 

Faulkner, lola Mae Hicks Raleigh 

Feltner, Karen Sommer Raleigh 

Fisher, Gladys Sandra Clintort 

Foster, Linda Jean Kernersville 

Funderburk, Judith Lee Aberdeen 

Geddie, Martha Ann Carper Raleigh 

Gorham, Frances Anne Rocky Mount 

Griffin, Rebecca Ann Monroe 

(82) 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1963 83 

Hall, Marion Kirtg Harrells 

Harrington, Clay Stokes Raleigh 

Harrington, Dixie Ruth Goldsboro 

Hawkins, Susan Curtis Greensboro 

Haywood, Elizabeth Jane — Cum Laude Pennsauken, New Jersey 

Heffner, Barbara Jean Salisbury 

Hege, Sonja Jean Winston-Salem 

Hicks, Carroll Arfn Raleigh 

Holleman, Ruth Elizabeth Durham 

Holloway, Virginia Lee Raleigh 

Hortort, Sandra Sue Louisburg 

Huff, Beverlye Ann Sanford 

Hughes, Mary Beth Colerain 

Hutchins, Patricia Carson Greensboro 

Jeffcoat, Sylvia Rebecca O'Daniel Wake Forest 

Johnson, Betty Jo Benson 

Johnson, Jo Arfne Statesville 

Johnson, Susan Gregory Elliott Raleigh 

Johnson, Vera Temple Hertford 

Jones, Barbara Ann— Cum Laude Durham 

Jones, Janet Faye Seven Springs 

Jones, Nancy Katherine Pink Hill 

Kirflaw, Peggy Ann Raeford 

Klick, Margaret Louise Hendersonville 

Knight, Frances Kay Ahoskie 

Lawrence, Jane Elizabeth Colerain 

Lawton, Elizabeth Ann Georgetown, South Carolina 

Leathers, Susan Louise Henderson 

Leffler, Gretchen Ruth Charlotte 

Leonard, June Carol Wirfston-Salem 

Lewis, Alice Jane Rutherfordton 

Link, Jane Elizabeth Warrenton 

Long, Janice Roberta — Magna Cum Laude Monroe 

McCormick, Mary Elizabeth Fairmont 

McFall, Julia Annette Madison 

McGee, Velma Ruth — Cum Laude Winston-Saleni 

McKelvey, Jearf Burrell Franklin 

McLamb, LaRue Bens'^n 

McManus, Elizabeth Lee Albemarle 

McPhauI, Hazel Ellen Red Springs 

Milam, Mary Lasley Raleieh 

Mills, Elizabeth Anne Parker Richmond, Virginia 

Moore, Mary Susan Rouzer Raleigh 

Morgan, Mary Louise Oxford 

Parker, Carolyn Miller Stuart, Virginia 

Parker, Joan Kaye Strickland Smithficld 

Pate, Mary Belle Asheboro 

Peterson, Eula Elizabeth Bolton 

Philbrick. Nena Leigh Cnry 

T'hillips, Margaret Rartd Rnleigh 

Pollock, Jean Ellen ^Trenton 

Pope, Anne Gertrude Magnolin 

Power, Brenda O'Dell Raleigh 

Rains, Patricia Ann Princeton 



84 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Renfrow, Nancy Elizabeth Fayetteville 

Rivers, Harriett Ann Wadesboro 

Robinsort, Nancy Amelia Clyde 

Rogers, Ellen Lockhart Albemarle 

Rogers, Patricia Ann Raleigh 

Ross, Susan Lou Ayden 

Sanders, Ann Carol Four Oaks 

Sawyer, Myra Kaye Elizabeth City 

Scearce, Brenda Corbett Raleigh 

Sears, Nancy Hercelia Stephens Raleigh 

Shouse, Judy Elizabeth Winston- Salem 

Smith, Salie Alene — Cum Laude Monroe 

Smith, Sarah Katheryn WirTgate 

Sorrell, Julia Ann Wadesboro 

Spence, Martha Gray Greensboro 

Squillario, Linnie Dianne Simmons Mt. Airy 

Starling, Faye Creech Pine Level 

Stem, Betsy Hughes Darlington, South Carolina 

Stuart, Fern Dahlstrom Raleigh 

Styron, Nell Joslin Raleigh 

Swairt, Judith Mizelle Raleigh 

Sykes, Eloise Edwards Raleigh 

Thompson, Miriamne Williams Sims 

Tripp, Joyce Dean Suffolk, Virginia 

Walker, Barbara Ann Snowden 

Warren, Sylvia Rose Snow Hill 

Weede, Katherine Covington Cheraw, South Carolina 

West, Carol Christian Durham 

Williams, Leah Rose Wilmingtorf 

Williams, Nancy Ellen Greensboro 

Wilson, Elizabeth Strong Raleigh 

Wolfe, Mary Ann Burgaw 

Wood, Betsy Barbour Benson 

Woodall, Elizabeth Ellen Erwin 

Yniguez, Zenaida Reyes Manila, Philippines 

York, Betsy Rush Asheboro 

Young, Betty AniTa Wake Forest 



REGISTER or STUDENTS 



Seniors 



Adams, Joy Anne Morven 

Allen, 

Marie-Louise. -Silver Spring, Md. 

Archer, Mildred Susan Charlotte 

Arledge, Linda Lee.Hendersonville 

Austin, Phyllis Carmeii Four Oaks 

Bailey, Rachel Borrita Wilson 

Baker, Alice Faye Snow Hill 

Baldwin, 

Mary Williams Whiteville 

Barden, Faith Murray Raleigh 

Barnhill, 

Geneva Undine Scotland Neck 

Bass, Betty Browning Jackson 

Bell. Martha Brooks Tabor City 

Bell, Marv Alice Aulander 

Benthall, Betsy Bland ...Woodland 

Bernard, Sarah Louise Raleigh 

Biggerstaff, 

Sandra Searcy Forest City 

Bivens, Barbara Ruth Monroe 

Bolton, Johnnie Claire. Rocky Mount 

Boone, Betsy Land Jackson 

Boutwell, Jean Youngblood. Raleigh 

Bowers, Barbara Diane Siler City 

Brickhouse, 

Brenda Kay Elliott Gary 

Brock, Betty Lou Rocky Mount 

Brown, Alice Virginia Raleigh 

Browir, Rebecca V/all Raleigh 

Bryan, Sara Gwynn Rnseboro 

Buckner, Virginia Kay Fox.Raleigh 

Bumpass, Jane Carver Roxboro 

Burroughs, 

Dorothy Ann Red Springs 

Butler, Sandra Jo Roseboro 

Campbell, Nancy Anne Caroleen 

Carver, Virginia Costner Raleigh 

Cash, Sylvia Ann Rutherfordton 

Chappell, 

Elizabeth Jean Nashville 

Chewning, Beverly Jeaif.Wadesboro 
Childrey, 

Anita Maier Richmond, Va. 

Coxe, Eugenia Carol Raleigh 

Craven, Martha Susanne Sanford 

Crawford, 

Judith Copdand- -Roanoke Rapids 

Creech, Kay Hridgers Smithfield 

Crowder, Hildreth Jo Raleigh 



Daugherty, 

Diane Edwards Norfolk, Va. 

Davis, Martha Smith ..Greensboro 

Dean, Phyllis Ann Raleigh 

Dean, Sandra Helen Selma 

Dennis, Eleanor Jo Star 

DeVVitt, Frances Ann Apex 

Dunn, Marie Hope Pinetopa 

Elliott, Judith Ann.Kiitgsport, Tenn. 

Ellis, Mary Ellen Fremont 

Ennis, Barbara Sue Dunn 

Evans, Linda Gale High Point 

Evans, Nancy Bronxville, N. Y. 

Farmer, Frieda Jane.Ljmchburg, Va. 
Featherston, 

Mary Eugenia Fort Payne, Ala. 

Finan, Mary Pauline Raleigh 

P^ish, Peggy Joyce Wilson 

Forbes, Betsy Jane Wilson 

Foxworth, Eva Mae. Winston-Salem 
Fuqua, Eliz.-'.beth Keighron.Raleigh 

Gash, Marjorie Graham Raleigh 

GillaiTd, Shellie Mull Raleigh 

Glenn, Frances Kathleen.. Durham 
Glover, Lucinda 

Belle Howell Wake Forest 

Godwin, 

Elizabeth Smith Greensboro 

Godwin, Nancy Llewellyn. Charlotte 
Gray, Barbara Brookshire ..Winton 
Green, Virginia K. Gray ...Raleigh 
Griffin, 

Elizabeth Camilfe Greer, S. C. 

Griffin, Lois Elaine Williamston 

Griffin, Martha Patricia Raleigh 

Grimshaw, 

Mary Ann Taylors, S. C. 

Hager, 

Carol Sue Galloway Charlotte 

Hall, Hannah Godwin Selma 

Hamilton, 

Margaret Louise Kern Raleigh 

Harrford, Martha Hayv/ood .Candor 

Harbison, Mary Israel McCain 

Harrill, 

Sandra Gayle Gaffney, S. C. 

Hnrtness, Freda Barry Sanford 

Hill, Joan Myatt Raleigh 

Hodges, Anne Palmer Farmvillo 

Holbert, Jerry Lou Albomnrlo 

Hooks, Betty Bowman FYemont 



(85) 



86 



MEKEDITH COLLEGE 



Houghton, 

Margaret Clay Danville, Va. 

House, Martha Andrews .--Monroe 
Howard, 

Frances Ann Richmond, Va. 

Humphrey, Rose Marie.— New Bern 

Hunt, Patricia Nileert Raleigh 

Isley, Jeanne Estelle Burlington 

Isley, Sally Gayle Burlington 

James, Sue Anne Raleigh 

Jeffords, ^ , ,. /^ 

Bobbie Lynne Columbus, Ga. 

Johnson, Frances Lewis. Greensboro 

Johnson, Mamie Lou Smithfield 

Johnson, Paula Sue Lillington 

Johnson. Ruth Ellen Goldsboro 

Kelly, 

Kathryn O'Neal Tabor City 

Kelly, Margaret Alice Raleigh 

Kelly, Sandra 

Elizabeth Andersoit Raleigh 

Kidd, „ 

Elizabeth Fitchett Haw River 

Kincheloe, 

Shirley Jane Richmond, Va. 

Lassiter, Phoebe Ellen Conway 

Lay, Patricia 

Lockhart Falls Church, Va. 

Lee, Jo Lynn Avett Raleigh 

Lloyd, Diana Dupree Raleigh 

Lloyd, Lillie Carol Durham 

Long, Betsy Rose Roxboro 

McCollum, Lois Elaine Madison 

McFarland, Lelia Downey .-Oxford 
McFarland, Lillian Frances—Oxford 

McKenney, . . „ ^ ,r 

Mary Lyon Virginia Beach, Va. 

McManus, Mary Juhan — Matthews 

McMillan, Joyce Oliver Selma 

McNairy, 

Frances King Greensboro 

Mackintosh, Joyce Ellen Raleigh 

Macomber, 

Priscilla Jane Charlotte 

Marks, Eleanor Leroy.-Laurinburg 
Mathis, Anna Lou..-Rutherfordton 

Matthews, 

Rebecca Grace Arlington, Va. 

Milford, Betty Louise Charlotte 

Montague, Carol Ellis Raleigh 

Moody, . 

Sue Ellen Louisville, Ky. 

Morgan, Rhonda Kay Lexington 

Nooe, Ann Fravel Pittsboro 

Norris, Carolyn Yvonne -Greensboro 
Norwood, Carolyn English. -Raleigh 

Osborne, Martha Ann Asheville 

Parrish, Margaret Jane — Charlotte 



Judith Lorraine Greensboro 

Patterson, Lena Rose Smithfield 

Peacock, Catherine Stovall-. Oxford 

Johifnie LaRue Wake Forest 

Pearce, Judith Faye ..Wake Forest 
Pearce, Millicent Katherine.. Lenoir 

Pegram, Patricia Hall Raleigh 

Perry, „ , . . 

Gloria Joan Thompson Raleigh 

Pierce, Linda Sue Charlotte 

Pittard, Pert Lile Norfolk, Va. 

Poole, Anne Pepper Kinston 

Powell, Adalia Wiggs Raleigh 

Prjitt, Margaret Page ..Louisburg 
Puckett, 

Mabel Ann Richmond, Va. 

Rackley, Elsie Margaret.Smithfield 
Radford, Barbara Jane — New Bern 
Rains, Annette Wicker Kenly 

Raines, 

Stella Karen Kings Mountain 

Rand, 

Jacquelitfe Eagles Chapel Hill 

Ratchford, Emily Jean Gastonia 

Ratley, 

Katherine Allison ..Red Springs 

Reams, Jane Carol Warrenton 

Register, 

Mary Katherine Franklin, Va. 

Rivers, 

Elizabeth Ann Camden, S. C. 

Rivers, Martha 

Redfearn Wadesboro 

Roberson, Clarene Frances-Hillsboro 

Roberts, Karen Ann Charlotte 

Senter, Penelope Ann Lillington 

Sessoms, Sandra Lee Apex 

Sherron, Louise Grady Raleigh 

Shervette, Lucie Geraldine .Enfield 
Shipp, Mary Pittard _ -Jacksonville 

Short, 

Gwendolyn Lenora-Baltimore, Md. 
Sides, Harriett Hartley —Welcome 
Simmons, 

Margaret Rymer Wadesboro 

Simms, Helen Florence Raleigh 

Smart, Cathy Ann Cliffside 

Smith, Brenda Margaret.New Bern 
Smith, Dollie Louisa— .Fayetteville 
Snider, 

Charity Ann Russell Denton 

Sodeman, 

Betty Albert Rocky Mount 

Spencer, Nancy Jane Raleigh 

Stainback, Joyce Ellen... New Bern 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



87 



Stallings, 

Christine Hardy Louisburg 

Stepheitson, Ann Herring Raleigh 

Strickland, 

Margaret Moring Rocky Mount 

Sullivan, Gayle Price Raleigh 

Sullivan, Jane Watkins Durham 

Swayne, 

Lucinda Gertrude Wilmington 

Tate. Jean Arthur Burlington 

Tench, Ann Gregson Raleigh 

Thomas, Linda Frances Morven 

Thomas, Marion 

Elizabeth Georgetown, S. C. 

Thornton, Linda Gail Four Oaks 

Tribble, 

Nancy Harwell Suffolk, Va. 

Tull, Bruce Brewer Rockingham 

Tupper, Patricia Artne Whiteville 

Tutor, Peggy Laura Holly Springs 

Tyndall, Mary Louise Kinston 

Wallace, Sandra Jean Charlotte 

Walter, Hannah Snellen Kinston 

Walters, Frances Ruth _La Grange 



Warlick, Emmalee Harris Raleigh 

Waters, Marguerite Ann.Greensboro 

Waters, Martha Babb Gary 

Watkins, Jane Willis. Rutherfordton 

Watson, Rebecca Jane Greensboro 

Welt, Ruth Susan Raleigh 

White, Ann Gordon Warrenton 

White, Elizabeth Stiles.Bayside, Va. 
Whitley, June Patricia .Albemarle 

Wicker, Judith Carole McCain 

Wilbur, Brenda Fritsche Raleigh 

Williams, Brenda Frances. .Raleigh 
Williams, 

Carol Harris Richmond, Va. 

Williams, Patricia Jane.Kannapolis 

Williams, Roberta Gail Canton 

Wilson, Elizabeth Faucette.Pittsboro 
Wilson, Mary Elizabeth.Thomasville 

Winfield, Mary Virginia Pinetown 

Wood, 

Sophia Elizabeth Clemson, S. C. 

Woodard, Mary Hadley Wilson 

Worrell, Jarte Raye-.Rutherfordton 
Younts, 

Mjiry Ann Hajmes Raleigh 



Janiors 



Abraham, 

Lynrt Virginia Alexandria, Va. 

Adams, Elaine Renegar Raleigh 

Adams, Jessica L?"nn Smithfield 

Ainsley, Mary Ann Ahoskie 

Allcott, 

Mary Virden Glen Allen, Va. 

Allen, Gloria Elaine Benson 

Andrews, Carol Vaughn Roseboro 

Arnold, Frances Ann Raleigh 

Armstrong, Nancy Amelia Belmont 

Autry, Corina Faye Bunnlevel 

Badders, Mary Sue 

Johrfson Kingstree, S. C. 

Baird, Norma Lucretia.-Lumberton 
Barbour, 

Sylvia Gray Willow Springs 

Barrow, 

Louisp DuI?ose_Spartanburg, S. C. 

Beard, Margaret Ann Fayetteville 

Bell, Lucy Taylor Louisburg 

Berry, Patricia Ann Drexel 

Booker, 

Mary Elizabeth Smithfield 

Boyd, Sherrort Winstead Wilson 

Bradshaw, 

Carol Bea Bluffton, S. C. 

Branon, Martha Carolyn ..Charlotte 
Braawcll, Phyllis Annette.. Zebulon 



Britt, Mary Anrt Smithfield 

Britton, Nell Cynthia Seaboard 

Brown, Glenda Lucile Wilmington 

Buffaloe, Nancy Jean Raleigh 

BufFaloe, Nancy Sue Raleigh 

Bullock, Dorothy Jane Wilson 

Burgess, Charlotte Ann Shiloh 

Butler, Julia Vann Elizabethtown 

Carawan, Zona Dare Harrells 

Carraway, 

Anrte Taylor Norfolk, Va. 

Carver, 

Sarah Louise Roanoke Rapids 

Chow, Verona 

Wen Lung Kowloon, Hong Kong 

Collins, Janet Louise Monroe 

Cook, Judith Summerlin_.Goldsboro 

Cox, Nell Jenniitgs Burlington 

Craft, Sandra Kay^.Winaton-Salem 

Craig, Nancy Helen Windsor 

Graver, Connie Rebecca Welcome 

Creech, Bonnie Sue Smithfield 

Currin, Mary Elizabeth Oxford 

Daughtry, 

Virginia Ruth .Charlestoif, S. C. 
Doaton, 

Judy Ann Cornelius. .Mooresville 
Dcrfny, 

Patricia Ann Hartsvillo, S. C. 



88 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Denson, 

Margaret Elizabeth.Rutherfordton 

Dilday, Allie Jane Ahoskie 

Dixon, 

Dorothy Hamilton .Galesville, Md. 
Dobbins, Mary Ruth. Winston-Salem 

Barbara Diane ..Nashville, Tenn. 

Drewes, Betty Louise Raleigh 

DuU. 

Adrianne Donna Winston-Salem 

Eaton, Jane Lull Asheville 

Ellis, Betty Jo Siler City 

Ennis, Leta Patricia Raleigh 

Ernst, 

Bettie Jane.. East Granby, Conn. 

Fayed, Wadad Roanoke Rapids 

Fisher, Carla Bonita Asheville 

Ford, Nancy Sue Canton 

Francis, Rose James Raleigh 

French, Joan Copeland Raleigh 

Frye, Dorothy Susan-Athens, Tenn. 

Fulk, Tomilee Lake View, S. C. 

Garrett, 

Frances Celeste Henderson 

Garrett, 

Nancy Elizabeth Henderson 

Garvey, Betty Gower Clayton 

Gentry, 

Robin Hortense __Winston-Salem 

Goodson, Lynn Marie Horse Shoe 

Goodwin, Rita Sue.-Alexandria, Va. 
Griffin, Judith Kay.Winston-Salem 

Guion. Anna Jane Marshville 

Haorwood, Susan Lynne Burfn 

Hall, Ellen Kay Durham 

Harris, Linda Jean Durham 

Hartness, Evelyn Crystal-Henderson 

Hatley, Libby Ann Durham 

Haverstock, 

Dortna Aline Roanoke Rapids 

Haywood, Kathrsm Earle.. Durham 
Hendricks, Jane Bettina— Nashville 

"Tfighsmfth, Peggy Jane Bethel 

Hines, Janet Louise Charlotte 

Holland, Elizabeth Jane.Lumberton 
Holliday, Carolyn Louise— Raleigh 
Hooper, 

Jane Tilson Elizabeth City 

Howell, Carolyn Elizabeth--Weldon 
Hurst. 

Patricia Heiring Wilmington 

Hutcherson, 

Nancy Jean Winston-Salem 

Ipock, Betty Hart New Bern 

Jackson, Bonnie Ruth Raleigh 

Johnson, Alice Anne Raleigh 

Jones, Mary Ann Davis Raleigh 

Jones, Nancy Lou Lewiston 



Joyce, Elizabeth Gail Madison 

Kerr, Margaret 

nertnison Hyattsville, Md. 

Kirkpatrick, Betty Glyn Maxton 

Knott, Ruth Ann Henderson 

Koch, 

Barbara Jean Northbrook, HI. 

Kriegel, Shirley Ann Raleigh 

Lambeth, Anrt Brock Bailey 

Lilly, Lynda Anne Oxford 

Lipscomb, 

Beverley Lee Richmond, Va. 

Lloyd, Loretta Leigh Raleigh 

Long, Brenda Carolyn Marshville 

McArthur, 

Martha McKinnon Laurinburg 

McCall, Pamela Jo Charlotte 

McCorkle, Ada Kay Fayetteville 

McCormick, Susan Francis-Fairmont 
McLoud, Jane Harriett-Elon College 

Martin, Jerry Ann Jonesville 

Martin, Penny Lee Tarboro 

May, Eleanor Carol Charlotte 

Mayhew, 

Sandra Jane Mooresville 

Metts, 

Evangelirfe Tsioumas Kinston 

Miller, 

Martha Jan Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Mintz, Elizabeth Anne.Norfolk, Va. 

Moore, Sarah Howard Raleigh 

Mt. Castle, 

Kay Marie Newport News, Va. 

Murdock, Judith F. Raleigh 

Myers, Lynn Beth Winstort-Salem 

Parker, 

Eleanor Hardaway .-Suffolk, Va. 

Parker, Ruby Rebecca Goldsboro 

Parker, Sarah Frances Jackson 

Penney, Lura Anne Kenansville 

Penninger, Doris Ann Lexington 

Petty, Brenda Carol Durham 

Plyler, 

Martha Blanchard-Whaleyville, Va. 

Porter, 

Susan Kesler Kirfgs Mountain 

Prevatte, Jean Ramey Raleigh 

Proctor, 

Jacqueline Kinkead.Rocky Mount 

Pugh, Janet Greensboro 

Radford, 

Cynthia Elizabeth New Bern 

Rawlinson, 

Nancy Bridgers.. Southern Pines 
Reavis, 

Elizabeth Lomax High Point 

Regan, Annie Maynette St. Pauls 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



89 



Savage, 

Ann Campbell Snyder Raleigh 

Savage, Katie Corinne Willard 

ShelUn, Brenda Nell„-Gretna, Va. 

Sheppard, Linda Gail Canton 

Shingleton, Juanita Anrt Wilson 

Simmons, 

Linda Ann Mt. Airy 

Smith, 

Andra Katherine..Pensacola, Fla. 

Smith, Helen Earle New Bern 

Smith, Marparet Exum Raleigh 

Sparrow, Willa Kaye Kinston 

Spertce, Betty Carolyn.Rocky Mount 
Stafford, 

Brenda Jo Ann Winston-Salem 

Stallings, 

Deborah Windsor Rocky Mount 

Staton, Martha Jay Wilmington 

Steele, Betty Jo Statesville 

Stevens, 

Ruth Carole Hopewell, Va. 

Stone, Martha Susan-Richmond, Va. 
Straughan, Mabel Jane Warsaw 



Strickland, 

Brenda Melba Rocky Mount 

Strickland, Judith Lee Erwin 

Svendsen, 

Annelise Hillerod, Dertmark 

Tankard, 

Josephine Nicholson .Washington 

Taylor, Harriet Virgini;'. Goldsboro 

Teachey, Sue Lyita Rose Hill 

Ussery, 

Catherine Elizabeth Kannapolis 

Vestal 

Catherine Elizabt'h Siler City 

Walker, Patricia Winston-Salem 

Washburn, Carol Bucher Durham 

Welch, Marion Elizabeth Moyock 

Whatley, 

Kathryn Elizabeth...Dillon, S. C. 
Whitley, Nancy Clifton. .Vandemere 
Wilfortg, Frances Pouder ..Raleigh 

Womble, Patricia Affn Lillington 

Woodard, Mary Charlotte. Nashville 
Young, Zuda Ellen Hickory 



Sophomores 



Alford, Betsy Warren Zebulon 

Alligood, Judy Carol.Elizabeth City 
Atwill, 

Alice Priscilla Richmond, Va. 

Barbee, Vivian 

Annette Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Barrier, Delinda Baine Concord 

Barron, Harriett Hamrick Canton 

Basham, Nancy Williams Spray 

Bell, Sarah Louise Hamlet 

Bell, Susait Carol Goldsboro 

Benton, Mclanie Smith Monroe 

Billinpton, Pamela Lynn.Wilmington 

Brancli, Jessica Diana Gary 

Brott, 

Prudence Jayne .Hillsdale, Mich. 
3rovvrr, Beverly Anne ..Mount Airv 

Brown, Jar.et Rebecca Raleign 

Brown, Patricia Neal ..Raleigh 

Bryant, 

Joanne Warner Rocky Mount 

Bunch, Marian Lee Edenton 

Caison, Susarf Parker Roseboro 

Canady, Joyce Laureen ..Charlotte 
Carlson, 

Elainp T?uth Florence, S. C. 

Carlson, Elizabeth Anne. Wilmington 
Carter, Betty Hastings Raleigh 



Carter, Linda Elaine ...Chadboum 

Caskey, Myra Ann Graham 

Chadwick, 

Josephine Norristown, Penn. 

Chandler, 

Sara Roselyn Southern Pines 

Childress, 

Beverley Dale Richmond, Va. 

demons, Mary Arfgela .Tabor City 
Clinard, 

Lelia Thomas High Point 

Coats, Phyllis Jean Angier 

Coleman, Alice Pamplico, S. C. 

Cooley, Jean Cowan Monroe 

Couns, Juliet Anne Raleigh 

Cox, 

Beverly Annette ..Richmond, Va. 

Creech, Alice Marie Snow Hill 

Cress, Annie Laurie Salisbury 

Crowe, Sheryl Clark New Bern 

Grumpier, Helen Elaine ..Smithfield 
Daniel, Joyce Eileen .Spring Hope 

Daves, Barbara Joyce Gastonia 

Davis, Gloria Antf Durham 

Davis, Ruth Gay Statesville 

Dickens, 

Florence Minerva Nashville 



90 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Duncan, Doris 

Phyllis Cluster Springs, Va. 

Dunstan, Virginia 

Herrirtgton Elizabe*:h City 

Eakes, Beth Devin Clinton 

Eaton, Janice Ann Asheboro 

Eicher, Bonnie Jean Charlotte 

Evarfs, 

Betsy Jeanne Frye Stoneville 

Farabow, Nancy Ann Oxford 

Felten, 

Carol Jean Aitnandale, Va. 

Ferguson, Wilda Marie Raleigh 

Floyd, Mary Elate Fairmont 

Flynt, 

Sandra Carolyn Winston-Salem 

Franklin, 

Georgia Leah Arlington, Va. 

Frederick, Linda Ann Goldsboro 

Gaines, Daphne Lynn Colston 

Gargis, 

I'orma Eugenia Norfolk, Va. 

Gay, Mary Bridgers Seaboard 

Greenwood, 

Betty Bunn Hines Raleigh 

Griffin, Carolyn Elizabeth .-Monroe 

Griffin, Bettie Ann Asheville 

Grogan, Janet Jo Winston-Salem 

Guthrie, Elizabeth Holmes-Asheville 
Hamrick, 

Judy Rose Wirtston-Salem 

Hanchey, Ann Gardna Rose Hill 

Hargrave, Carolyn Kay Boone 

Harrington, 

Ruth Simmons Washington 

Hartsell, Billie Anne Jonesville 

Hatcher, Linda Diane Garner 

Hauser, 

Anita Wilma Winston-Salem 

Haverstock, 

Mary Elizabeth -Roanoke Rapids 
Hedrick, 

Kay Elizabeth High Point 

Herring, Mary Louise Southport 

Hicks, Peggy West Raleigh 

Hilton, Bonita Sue Lexington 

Hinson, Helen Pope Kinstort 

Holden, Da\vn Gay Hudson 

Holmes, Jane Barnwell- -Burlington 
Howard, 

Mary Kaye Puguay Springs 

Hubbard, Judith Marie. Norfolk, Va. 

Hudler, Pansy Inez Midway Park 

Huss, Ann Wi-ight Cary 

Ingold, Helen Johnette Wadesboro 

Inman, Martha Adele Wilmirfgton 

James, Grace Herring Bethel 

Johnson, 

Barbara Ann Four Oaks 



Johnson, Carole Evelyn __Mt. Airy 
Johnson, 

Virgirtia Redfem Lillington 

Jordan, 

Pamela Elizabeth .-Danville, Va. 

Jorgensen, Joyce Ann Southport 

Kanipe, Mary Ann Fair Bluff 

Kelly, Sue Grey Tabor City 

Kesler, Lou Ross Henderson 

King, Martha Adelaide ..Nashville 

Kirtley, Ann Pate Durham 

Knauff, Marguerite Lane -Charlotte 

Knight, Jo Ann Greensboro 

Kornegay, Anne Gray Washington 

Lambeth, 

Mary Katherirfe Thomasville 

Langdon, Madelyn 

Carol Johnson City, Tenn. 

Lawhon, Betty Rae Rutherfordton 

Lee, Yeun Sook Raleigh 

Leonard, 

Patricia Anne High Point 

Le Roy, Donna Lou Raleigh 

Lester, Martha Elizabeth Kinston 

Lewis, Anita Temple New Bern 

Lipscomb, 

Frances Carlton .-Richmond, Va. 
Little, 

Rebekah Hoylene Taylors, S. C. 

Litton, Nancy Lee High Point 

Lowry, Jean Paula Norfolk, Va. 

Lumsden, Helen DiaiTne -Statesville 
Lyles, 

Doris Jean Roanoke Rapids 

McClenny, Nancy Barnes Lucama 

McDuffie, 

Mary Judith Red Springs 

McEnally, 

Susan Katherine New Berrf 

McMakin, Martha Alice- -Greensboro 

Marsh, Pearl Price High Point 

Martin, Sandra Lynn Raleigh 

Maynard, Judith Liles Harrells 

Medlin, Virginia Lytton Monroe 

Mentavlos, Tula Ann Gastonia 

Merkhan, 

Fadia Ebrahim Baghdad, Iraq 

MilhoUand. Jenie Wilson-Statesville 

Miller, Juliarfa Concord 

Mills, Martha Vetra Taylorsville 

Mims, Susan Neileen Charlotte 

Moore, Elizabeth 

Marshall Clarksville, Va. 

Moore, Mary Fisher Washington 

Moore, 

Polly Newton Lynchburg, Va. 

Morgan, Sandra Leo Asheville 

Morris, Brenda Anne Albemarle 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



91 



Morris, Janet Kay Durham 

Uorris, 

Linda Drake Sandston, Va. 

Morrison, 

Lirfda Lee Pulliam-Ridgeway, Va. 
Munford, Dheadrr. Woody .-Durham 

Newton, Janice Faye Rose Hill 

Nieuwenhuis, 

Elizabeth Hilly Mount Airy 

Nirmel, Kari C. Raleigh 

Nixon, Sally Harwell Wilson 

Gates, Murilla Emma New Bern 

Odom, 

Sue Kirby Pampa, Texas 

Owen, Rachel 

Marie Buffalo Junction, Va. 

Parker, 

Margaret Anne Wirtston-Salem 

Peeler, Jane Adele Shelby 

Peterson, Patricia Ann Clinton 

Petree, 

Judith Wynona __Winston-Salem 

Phillips, 

Mary Ellert Fayetteville 

Pierce, Judith Faye Durham 

Poole, Sarah Ann Kinston 

Pruett, Ruth Charlotte 

Rackley, 

Linda Carolyn Rose Hill 

Ratchford, 

Julia Ann Richmond, Va. 

Raver, Mary Elizabeth Gary 

Raynor, Sarah Aitne Ahoskie 

Reich, Katherine 

Rebecca Winston-Salem 

Rice, Garolynn 

Yutzy Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Riddick, Carolyn Gross Raleiph 

Riley, Judith Gay Rocky Mount 

Riley, Sara Lynn Wilson 

Riley. Wilma Jenn Hillsboro 

Roberta, Martha Anne Mt. Gilead 

Robertson, 

CarolyiT Anne Winston-Salem 

Robinson, Willa Ford-Richmond, Va. 
Rogers, Betty Lois ..Wake Forest 
Riiark, 

Rena Westbrook --Rocky Mount 

Samuels, Joyce Ferree Burlington 

Sanner, Helen Joyce Windsor 

Savage, Joe Ann Spring Hope 

Scarborough, Betsy Wood -Windsor 
Shannon, 

Patricia BenrTette Goldsboro 

Shnnor. 

Elizabeth Lou Morehead City 

Shaver, Miriam Rebecca ..Goldsboro 
Sheets, Lydia Carol Greensboro 



Simrson, 

Joan Frances RobersoitviUe 

Singletary, 

Judith Dianne Dublin 

Singleton, 

Susan Elizabeth Red Sprmgs 

Sloop, Ruth Ann Dublin, Va. 

Smith, Barbara Allen Raleigh 

Smith, Marylin Sue Asheboro 

Smith, . 

Ruth Parhaw Britt Raleigh 

Sned, Marcia Corrtelia ..-Salisbury 
Sparger, Margaret Anne.Wadesboro 
Stevenson, Linda Gail Hickory 

Stokes 

Louise Siewers ..Winston-Salem 

Swain, Ann Wells Washington 

Sweaney, Betty Foushee ..Durham 

Taylor, Alice Kennedy KirTston 

Thomas, Nancy DeAnne Raleigh 

Thompson, Kent Barnes ..Goldsboro 

Tiley, 

Dianne Kirflaw Merrick, N. Y. 

Tilley, Barbara Stroud ..New Bern 

Tolston, Patricia Ann Kinston 

Usserv, Barbara Dawn-_-Lexington 

Via, Helen Rogers Ralei<rh 

Von Elm, Nancy ..Lynnhaven, Va. 

Voshell, Evelyn Joan New Bern 

Wainscott, Mary Lynne Durham 

Waller, Violet Elaine Kinston 

Warren, Edith Carol -Robersonville 
Watson, Barbara 

Jane Annandale, Va. 

Welsted, 

Candace Carroll .-Madison, N. J. 

Weston. Mildred Jane Wirtdsor 

Whedbee, Lucy Ann ..-Williamston 
Whitaker. Anna Neal -Bryson City 

White, Patricia Ann Wilmington 

Whitfield. 

Mary Margaret Snow Hill 

Wilkorson, Nell Ruth Marion 

Williams, LaRay Hope-Norfolk, Va. 

Willis, Gail Roberts Durham 

Wilson, Betty Carolyn O-xford 

Wilsorf, Helen Virginia Monroe 

Wilson, Jane Allene Lincolnton 

Wilson. Judith Arfn Fayetteville 

Womack. Jane McNeill ..Carthage 
Woodford, Svlvia Lee ..Goode. Va. 
Worcester, Linda Dell Charlotte 

Worth, Margaret 

Elizabeth Southern Pirtes 

Wrenn. Dianne Martin -Mooresville 
Yarbrouph, 

Patricia Jane Charlotte 

Yelton, Agnes Neleen Concord 



92 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Freshmen 



Aldridge, Hannah Kay Monroe 

Allen, Sandra Lee Farmville 

Altman, Linda Marie Kinston 

Amrtott, Mary Susan Durham 

Arthur, Anne Maxwell Asheboro 

Ashburn, 

Kathryn Anne Mt. Airy 

Askari, Nasrin (Mrs.) Raleigh 

Austell, Jeslyn McCall Concord 

Baggett, Ann Wilson Fayetteville 

Bailey, Adrianne Rose Roxboro 

Ball, Mary Lambert Wilmington 

Ballard, 

Cheryl White. .Newport News, Va. 
Banner, Nirta Mauney __Morganton 

Barnes, Frana Kay Hillsboro 

Barrington, 

Cynthia Diane Dillon, S. C. 

Batson, Mary Ann Burgaw 

Bauer, Beverly Jean Lumberton 

Bellomy, Barbara Lynn.Wilmingtort 
Bennett, 

Carolyn Margaret.Winston-Salem 
Berry, 

Ann Elizabeth Elizabeth City 

Biggs, Gayle Lennon Wilmington 

Bishop, Pamela Mae-_Powells Point 
Blackmore, Marie Frances ..Burgaw 

Blalock, Jenrfy Hope Raleigh 

Bostick, Dorothy Jane Wilson 

Boswell, Carolyn Sue Burlington 

Bradley, Mary Helen Grifton 

Bradshaw, Sharon Arlene Drexel 

Bragg, Julia Taylor Monroe 

Bridgers, Susan Pinner Rowland 

Brockett, 

Rosalind Box (Mrs.) Raleigh 

Brooks, 

Rachel Elizabeth- -Roanoke Rapids 

Browrt, Dee Ann Reidsville 

Brown, Judith Carroll Raleigh 

Bro\vn, Rachael Reade Roxboro 

Bruton, 

Kathryn Jo Silver Spring, Md. 

Bryan, Brenda Louise Bladenboro 

Butler, Gail Carmen Roseboro 

Butler, Martha Ann Roseboro 

Caldwell, Rebecca Sue Shelby 

Capell. Carroll Ann Wadesboro 

Carroll, Judith Frances Weldon 

Carver, 

Barbara Jean Roanoke Rapids 



Chapmart, 

Rebekah Ann Quincy, Fla. 

Clements, Retta Jo Greensboro 

Cockerham, 

Karen Jean Winston-Salem 

Coleman, 

Martha Jane Pamplico, S. C. 

Collier, Mary Elaine -.Fayetteville 

Collins, Susan Payne Richmond, Va. 

Cooke, Carol Jean Elkin 

Copelartd, 

Sarah Hardison Enfield 

Coram, Judith Boonville 

Corley, 

Priscilla Joan Scotland Neck 

Crabtree, Miriam Carolyn .-Raleigh 

Craven, Jean Webster Sanford 

Craven, 

Margaret Vire Bethesda, Md. 

Crocker, 

Constance Leona Greensboro 

Crumly, Candace Charlotte 

Curtis, 

Ruth Merrill- -Newport News, Va. 

Daniel, Shirley Marie Gary 

Daniels, 

Elizabeth Ross Washingtort 

Davis, Susan Lynn Raleigh 

DeHart, 

Meredith Louise Asheville 

Dickens, Elizabeth Ann-.Mt. Gilead 

Dobbs, Brenda Ida Candler 

Dozier, 

Adelia Ann Fukuoka, Japan 

Dudley, Barbara Jean Pittsboro 

Dudley, Mary Blanche Pipeville 

Eagles, Doris Elizabeth Ahoskie 

Earnhardt, Nettie Albemarle 

Ehle, Nancy Elizabeth Asheville 

El-Kammash, 

Khadiga Port Fouad, Egypt 

Ellis, Judy Anrt Clarkton 

Everette, 

Helen Elizabeth Robersonville 

Feeley, Martha Carol ..Washington 

Felton, Janet Lee Norfolk, Va. 

Fisher, June Collier.. Elizabethtown 
Fitchett, Pamela Howell.. Pittsboro 

Fitz, Wylda Gayle Chadbourn 

Fletcher, 

Judith Tompkins Chapel Hill 



REGISTER OP STUDENTS 



93 



Floyd, Sarah Frances Lumberton 

Forrest, Nancy Moore ..Greenville 
Freeman, 

Katharine Anrf...Rock Hill, S. C. 
Gash, Margaret 

Earle Spartanburg, S. C. 

Gentry, Judy Gail Roxboro 

Gilliam, 

Mary Louise South Boston, Va. 

Goulais, 

Susan Anne Delray Beach, Fla. 

Grant, Rebecca Ann Franklin 

Grant, Wanda Susan Raleigh 

Griffin, Carol Artn Red Oak 

Gregory, 

Lynda Josephine Wilmington 

Green, Joan Elizabeth Raleigh 

Giumbles, Lynn Carol. .Fayetteville 

Hall, Barbara Elizabeth Pineville 

Hall, 

Margaret Ann.. South Boston, Va. 
Hampton, Anrt Catharine ..Durham 
Hartley, Mary Elizabeth. .Charlotte 
Hawthorne, 

Lucy Buchanan Lunenburg, Va. 

Haywood, 

Janice Elizabeth Candor 

Helms, Elizabeth Carol Monroe 

Helms. Joanna Roanoke Rapids 

Henderson, 

Martha Lillian Greenville 

Hines, Cynthia Gail Wilmirfgton 

Hinkle, 

Mary Elizabeth Winston-Salem 

Hobbs, Sandra Lee Raleigh 

Hocutt, 

Jane Elizabeth Charlotte 

Hofler, Carolyn Corinne Concord 

Hollaman, Myra Louise Fletcher 

Holt, Mary Sue Burlington 

Holt, Mildred Irene Asheboro 

Honneycntt, Jearf Lucille ..Concord 

Hooks, Mary Jean Fremont 

Home, Doris Faye Wilson 

Home, Sandra Gayle Wilson 

House, Gloria Anne Hobgood 

Howell, Marie Louise Asheville 

Howell, Patsy Spruill Woldon 

Hoyle, Tanya Elizabeth Enfield 

Huggins, Ann Lassiter ..Louisburg 

Hull, Joan Marie Tarboro 

Humphrey, Carolyrf Marie ..Raleigh 
Hunnicutt, 

Martha Eppes Stony Creek, Va. 

Ilgcnfritz, Olivia Tucker. Hazehvood 
Johnson, 

Sarah Morris Winston-Snlem 



Kerr, 
Carolyn Enders ..Hyattsville, Md. 

Kimball, 

Georgia Caroljm ..Lemon Springs 

King, Carol Forrest Charlotte 

King, 

Elizabeth Swinson Wilmingtort 

King, 

Pamela Jean South Boston, Va. 

Kirby, Nancy Ellen ..Winston-Salem 

Lane, Corinne Gay Siler City 

Laney, Linda Glenn Monroe 

Laugel, 

Susart Short Hills, N. J. 

Lay, 

Emily Graham. .Falls Church, Va. 
Layton, Edith Janette ..Burlington 

League, Sarah Jane Waynesville 

Ledbetter, 

Sandra Lou Asheville 

Lemmond, Jean Hudson ..Matthews 
Lewis, Edith Shepherd. ..Goldsboro 
Lewis, Patricia Anne High Point 

McCrary, 

Janice Valvin Rocky Mount 

McDonald, 

Zelma Gloria Rocky Mount 

McGlohon, Jane Greenville 

McGoogan, 

Marilyn Jean . Red Springs 

McKethan, 

Nancy Blue Dillon, S. C. 

McKinney, 

Toni Kyle Key West, Fla. 

McLamb, Opal Sandra Clinton 

McPhaul, 

Marion Zula Whiteville 

Maness, Frartces Ann Gastonia 

Marcuson, 

Marilyn Akera ...Winston-Salem 
Marks, Paula Memory.. Mooresville 
Marshall, Beth Bellaire...Hillsboro 
Mayhue, Mary Marcelyn — Raleigh 
Memory, Stella Meredith ..Raleigh 

Midgett, Jane Adair Kinston 

Miller, Alice Elizabeth Concord 

Miller, Joan Elaine Taylorsville 

Miller, 

Mary Elizabeth Union, S. C. 

Mills, Barbara Ann Taylorsville 

Milton, Mary Faith Monroe 

Mitchell, 

Charlotte Amelia ..Staurtton, Va. 

Molony, Elizabeth Ann Durham 

Montague, 

Harriotto Lee Arlingfton, Va. 

Mvers, 

Hilda Joy Laurel Springs 



94 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Myers, 

Marjorie Gwynne Winston-Salem 

Newton, Sandra Lumberton 

Noel, 

Blanche Gilliam Richmond, Va. 

Nurkin, Rita Webster Durham 

Otts, 

Charlotte Louise Chapel Hill 

Page, 

Laura Jean Kirtgs Mountain 

Partin, Margaret Ann Enfield 

Peacock, 

Jessie Beth_ .Virginia Beach, Va. 

Pearee, Sylvia Wake Forest 

Perry, Helen Elizabeth Shelby 

Pettebone, 

Kathleen Elizabeth-Annapolis, Md. 

Pickett, Jo Ann Winston-Salem 

Pope, Sallie Dunn Scotland Neck 

Potter, Mary Florerfce Lumberton 

Powell, 

Mary Elizabeth_Sweetwater, Tenn. 
Pritchard, Georgia Dianne_Aulander 

Rabb, Veronica Louise Marion 

Rabon, Prances Dunn Monroe 

Ramsey, Judy Gail Charlotte 

Ramsey, Suzanne Marie Shelby 

Reynolds, 

Martha Kent Richmond, Va. 

Rhodes, Mary Ruth Raleigh 

Ritchie, 

Jeanitie McCoy Richmond, Va. 

Rives, 

Elizabeth Stuckey High Point 

Roach, Betty Jo Reidsville 

Rodgers, 

Margaret Judith Franklinville 

Roebuck, Nancy Rivers -Washington 

Rogers, Susan Kelly Albemarle 

Rollins, Ann Blanton Shelby 

Rudisili, Joyce Mclntyre. -Charlotte 

Russell, Carole Anne Asheville 

Sandford, 

Aletha Charlene Asheville 

Scarborough, 

Beverly Arfn Mt. Olive 

S hertz, Agnes 

Florence Cocoa Beach. Fla. 

Scott, Judith C'le Kenly 

Sells, Judy Anu Bedford, Mass. 

Senter, Mary Frances Lillington 

Shaw, Rose Ann Lumberton 

Singletary, Lola Carolyii-Bladenboro 
Smith, 

Dianne Millicent Rocky Mourft 

Smith, Josephine Peele Raleigh 

Smith, Lee Parker Durham 



Smith, Margaret Joanne Shelby 

Smith, Sheila Dickerson ..Windsor 
Snyder, 

Suzanne Lakeland, Fla. 

Stamey, Julia Diane High Point 

Stanley, 

Peggy Faye Hardie Clarendon 

Stilley, Nancy Carol New Bent 

Stoudemire, 

Sylvia Lynn Lincolnton 

Swanson, 

Merry Susan Winston-Salem 

Taylor, Gail Malinda Statesville 

Teague, Jane Faye Lumberton 

Thomas, Janet Lou Lerfoir 

Thompson, 

Carolyn Sue Salisbury 

Thompson, Ellen Diane Durham 

Thompson, 

Joan Elizabeth McLean, Va. 

Tomlinson, 

Barbara P. (Mrs.) Raleigh 

Trotter, Margaret 

Elizabeth Winston-Salem 

Turner, Jennie Arfn Raleigh 

Turner, 

Kathryn Ann Columbia, S. C. 

Vaughan, 

Brenda Jean Roanoke Rapids 

Vierson, Donna Dukes Ahoskie 

Wacaster, 

Judith Adaire Charlotte 

Wade, Fredrica 

Mack Fowley Morehead City 

Walker, Sarah Rebecca.. Battleboro 

Walter, Anne Benton Kirfston 

Ward, Bess Aleine Bladenboro 

Warrick, 

Margaret Barrett Smithfield 

Webb, Elizabeth Anne ..Statesville 
Whisnant, Joyce Bennett ..Durham 

White, Eleanor Amelia Colerain 

Whitty, Louise West New Bern 

Williams, 

Charlotte Louise Wilmington 

Williams, 

Delia Christine Darfville, Va. 

Wilson, Brenda Ann Kinston 

Wilson, Harriet Anne Raleigh 

Wilson, 

Martha Jane Clemson, S. C. 

Wilson, Patricia Ann Asheville 

Worthington, 

Laura Elizabeth Ayderf 

Wright, 

Linda Dianne Roanoke Rapids 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



Wynn, Patricia Levator Tarboro 

Young, Doris Frances Beaufort 

Young, Judi Marie Hickory 

Young, 

Mary LaRue Kingstree, S. C. 



Young, Ruth Claire ... 
Zealy, 
Libby Hollingworth 



95 

-Smithfield 
.-Charlotte 



Specials 



Seville, Barbara Dolores Raleigh 

Bishop, Cathy Raleigh 

Brannan, Elizabeth Smith Gary 

Britton, Margaret Dodd Raleigh 

Buff aloe, Katherine Anrt Raleigh 

Burke, S. Dale Raleigh 

Bush, Patricia D. Raleigh 

Byrd, Vicky Leigh Raleigh 

Campbell, Ruby Kathryn Raleigh 

Cedergren, O. Eric Raleigh 

Cobb, William Jerry Raleigh 

Cook, 

Norma Louise Baker LexingtoiT 

Chelf, Margaret Eileen-Morrisville 

Church, Barbara Hume Durham 

Coggins, Anna Katherine ..Raleigh 

Crisp, Cynthia Louise Raleigh 

Culton, Evelyn Hay Chapel Hill 

Cunningham, 

Robert E., Jr. Raleigh 

Daly, Marian F. Clinton 

Eckels, Christine Ann Raleigh 

Evans, Timothy Joe Raleigh 

Fratkin, Libby Sandra Raleigh 

Gainor, Frances Powell Raleigh 

Garb, Monica Clare Raleigh 

Geoghegan, Ivey F. Raleigh 

Gibson, Linda Lucile Raleigh 

Gilbert, Lena Bryan Raleigh 



Greene, Grace Bailey Raleigh 

Hartman, Kathy Louise Raleigh 

Hartman, Martha Albert ..Raleigh 

Hartman, Peter David Raleigh 

Hill, Adrienrfe Claire Raleigh 

Holden, Thomas Cleveland .Raleigh 

Holland, Betty W Raleigh 

Kare, Susan D. Raleigh 

Leake, Lu Raleigh 

LeMay, Flossie B. Raleigh 

Mann, Margaret Emily Raleigh 

Margeson, John Thomas Raleigh 

Mason, Marjorie Frances ..Raleigh 

Moffett, David F. Raleigh 

Murray, Susan Rebecca Raleigh 

Newton, Edna Nichols Raleigh 

Nolstad, Margo Raleigh 

Northcutt, Janice E. Gary 

Peacock, Julia Anne Raleigh 

Robinson, Myra Gertrude __Raleigh 
Shackelford, 

TIargot Gladding Raleigh 

Smisson. Sally Williams Raleigh 

Speck, Susan Carol Raleigh 

Stone, Margaret Ferguson Raleigh 

Styron, Nell Joslin Raleigh 

Sykes, Carol Lynne Raleigh 

Talton, Fred Wesley Raleigh 

Thomas, Ruth Finken Gary 

Wilsort, Lois Newton Raleigh 



Summer Session, 1963 



Adams, Jessica Lynn Smithfield 

Adams, Joy Anne Morven 

Allen, Gloria Elaine Benson 

Ashbum, 

Kathryn Anne Mt. Airy 

Arnold, 

Frances Ann Livingstorf _ .Raleigh 
Banks, Margaret Sterling ..Garner 

Barbour, I'Vances Lewis Raleigh 

Barnes, Charles Landis Raleigh 

Barron, Harriett Hamrick ._Canton 

Beaver, Katherine Scott Asheville 

Bernard, Sarah Louise Raleigh 



Blalock, Jenny Hope Raleigh 

Boutwell, Jean Yourtgblood Raleigh 

Boyd, Rachael Baity Raleigh 

Branch, Jessica Diana Gary 

Brickhouse, Brcnda ' Mott Gary 

Brockett, Rosalind Box Raleigh 

Brott, 

Prudence Jayne ..Hillsdale, Mich. 

Brown, Beverly Anne Mt. Airy 

Brown, Patricia Neal Raleigh 

Brown, Rebecca Wall Raleigh 

Euokner, Virginia Kay Raleigh 

Buffaloe, Nancy Sue Raleigh 



96 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 



Bumpass, Jane Carver Roxboro 

Carter, Betty Hastings Raleigh 

Chandler, 

Martha Martirt Salisbury, Md. 

Cheaves, Nancy Rose_. Spring Hope 
Childers, 

Donna Margaret Hopewell, Va. 

Chow, Verona 

Wen Lung -_Kowloon, Hong Kong 

Clark, Betsy Wood Raleigh 

Cook, Judith A. Summerlin. Raleigh 

Costner, Virginia Ruth Raleigh 

Creech, Gladys Jeannette ..Clayton 

Creech, Kay Bridgers Durham 

Cunningham, Robert Raleigh 

Daniel, Donna Ray ..Collinsville, Va. 
Daughtry, 

Virginia Ruth .. Charleston, S. C. 

Davis, Barbara Harris Raleigh 

Davis, Louisa Mcintosh Raleigh 

Deaton, Margaret Pauline Raleigh 

Denson, Margaret 

Elizabeth Rutherfordton 

Dickens, Florence Miiterva-Castalia 

Eaton, Janice Ann Asheboro 

Edwards, 

Camille Griffin Greer, S. C. 

Edwards, Sylvia Lane Apex 

Elliott, 

Judith Ann Kingsport, Tenn. 

Ellis, Carol Don Raleigh 

Everette, 

Helen Elizabeth Robersonville 

Featherston, 

Mary Eugenia Fort Payife, Ala. 

Ferguson, Wilda Marie Raleigh 

Floyd, Mary Kate Fairmont 

Frye, Betsy Jeanne Stoneville 

Frye, Dorothy Susan Athens, Tenn. 

Garb, Monica Clair Raleigh 

Gash, Marjorie Graham Raleigh 

Gilbert, Lena Bryan Raleigh 

Gilland, Shellie Mull Raleigh 

Godwin, Janie Carole Durham 

Garvey, Betty Clayton 

Grant, Wartda Susan Raleigh 

Griffin, Martha Patricia Raleigh 

Harrington, Clay Stokes Raleigh 

Harris, Linda Jean Durham 

Hatley, Libby Ann Raleigh 

Hobby, Jean Edgerton Raleigh 

Holloway, Virginia Lee Raleigh 

Hooks, Mary Jean Fremont 

Hughes, Nancy Osborne Raleigh 

Huss, Ann Wright Cary 

Inmart, Martha Adele Wilmington 

Jackson, Bonnie Ruth Raleigh 



Johnson, Barbara Ann Four Oaks 

Johnson, 

Katherine Elizabeth Raleigh 

Kaufman, Ann Terry Raleigh 

Keel, Beth Leah Rocky Mount 

Kelly, Margaret Alice Raleigh 

Kerr, Margaret 

Dennison Hyattsville, Md. 

Kesler, Lou Ross Henderson 

Kincheloe, 

Shirley Jane Richmond, Va. 

King, Martha Adelaide Nashville 

Knott, Ruth Ann Henderson 

Lambeth, 

Mary Katharine Thomasville 

LeMay, Flossie B. Raleigh 

Lewis, Becky A. Asheville 

Lyles, Lucy Green Henderson 

McDuffie, 

Mary Judith Red Spriifgs 

McLoud, 

Jane Harriett Elon College 

McWhorter, 

Marjorie Louise Carrboro 

Martin, Sandra Lynn Raleigh 

May, Eleanor Carol Charlotte 

Miller, Judith Frances Hillsboro 

Moffett, Rosalie Raleigh 

Murphy, Anne Frazier Raleigh 

Myers, 

Hilda Joy Laurel Springs 

Newton, Edna N. Raleigh 

Gates, Murilla Emma New Bern 

Owen, Rachel 

Marie Buffalo Junction, Va. 

Park, 

Sung Sook Seoul, Korea 

Parrish, Rosalyrt Ellen Raleigh 

Pearce, 

Elsie Young Wake Forest 

Peek, Blanche Tweed Gamer 

Perry, Gloria Joan Raleigh 

Potter, Alice Cooper Raleigh 

Power, Brenda Joyce Raleigh 

Price, Priscilla Watson Raleigh 

Register, 

Mary Katherine Franklin, Va. 

Reid, Margie Beatrice Raleigh 

Rhodarmer, Mary Rebecca Canton 

Rice, Carolynn 

Yutzy Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Riley, Judith Gay Rocky Mount 

Roberts, 

Martha Anne Mount Gilead 

Rogers, Emma Matthis Madison 

Rose, Stepharfie Raleigh 

Rust, Mary Pettinger Raleigh 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



97 



Sledge, 

Mary Katharine WhiteviTle 

Smart, Cathy Ann Cliffside 

Smith, 

Andra Katherine.-Pensacola, Fla. 

Smith, Helen Earle New Bern 

Stallings, 

Christine Hardy Louisburg 

Stanford, Thomas Earl Raleigh 

Stokes, 

Louise Siewers Winston-Salem 

Stoller, Blanche Lucille Raleigh 

Stone, Margaret P. Raleigh 

Sullivan, Jane Watkirts Durham 

Tench, Ann Gregson Raleigh 

Teague, Jane Faye Lumberton 

Tesh, 

Mary Jane Wake Forest 

Thomas, Linda Frances Morven 

Thompson, 

Kent Barnes Goldsboro 

Tsioumas, Evangeline Raleigh 



Via, Helen Rogers Raleigh 

Vick, Empress Jortes Cary 

Walker, Patricia Winston-Salem 

Warrick, 

Margaret Barrett Smithfield 

Waters, Martha Babb Cary 

Waters, Martha Lucille Raleigh 

Watson, 

Elizabeth Cleveland Raleigh 

Webb, Elizabeth Anne ..Statesville 
Whisnant, Joyce Bennett. .Durham 

Whitley, June Patricia Albemarle 

Wiatt, Jacquelynn Walker.. Raleigh 

Wilfong, Frances Pouder Raleigh 

Williams, Brenda F^arfces Raleigh 

Williams, Nancy Ellis Spray 

Wilson, Bettie Carolyn Oxford 

Wood, 

Sophia Elizabeth. .Clemson, S. C. 

Woodard, H. Brooks Raleigh 

Worcester, Linda Dell Charlotte 

Wrenn, Dianne Martin Charlotte 

Yu, Soon Wha Raleigh 



98 MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Summary of Students 

Seniors 211 

Juniors 169 

Sophomores 212 

Fresiimen 256 

Total Classmen 848 

Special Students 56 

904 

Slimmer School Students 150 

1054 

Less (For Duplication) 96 

Net Enrollment 958 



Net Enrollment by States and Foreign Countries 

Alabama 1 Pennsylvania 1 

Connecticut 1 South Carolina 26 

Florida 6 Tennessee 5 

Georgia 1 Texas 1 

Illinois 1 Virginia 65 

Kentucky 1 * * * ^ 

Maryland 11 Denmark 1 

Massachusetts 1 Egypt 1 

Michigan 1 Hong Kong 1 

New Jersey 2 Iraq 1 

New York 2 Japan 1 

North Carolirfa 826 Korea 1 



INDEX 



Academic Reg:ulations 31 

Administratiort 8 

Admission 26, 28 

Advanced Standing 28 

Alumnae Association, Officers of 14 

Art 42 

Athletic Association 20 

Attendance, Class 36 

Baptist Student Union 18 
Biology 44 
Buildings 15 
Business 46 



Calendar 4 

Calendar, College 5 

Certificates, N. C. 51, 52 

Chapel 17 

Chemistry 49 

Chorus 19, 74 

Church Music 69 

Classification 39 

Clubs, Departmental 18 

Committees, Faculty and Staff 13 

Concerts 70 

Courses of Instruction 42 

Dean's List 38 
Degree, Bachelor of Arts 31 
Degree, Bachelor of Music 34, 69 
Degree Requirements 31 
Degrees Tonferred, 1963 82 
Dormitories 15 

Early Decision Plan 28 
Economics 48 
Education 51 
Eligibility 38 
English 55 

Entrance Examination 27 
Entrance Units 27 
Examinations 39 
Expenses 21 

Faculty 9 

Foreign I^anguages 57 

Foundation 15 

French 57 

Freshman Year 34 

Geography 81 

German 58 

Grading System 37 

Graduation with Distinction 38 

Health 17 

Health Education 60 

History 63 

Home Economics 65 

Home Management House 16, 66 

Infirmary 17 



Kappa Nu Sigma 18 

Latin 59 
Library 16 
Loan Funds 24 
Location 15 



67 



Mathematics 

Music 68 

Music Education 72 

Organ 75 
Orientation 30 

Part-Time Students 29 

Philosophy 78 

Physical Education 60, 61 

Physics 50 

Piano 75 

Political Science 64 

Psychology 77 

Publications 19 

Purpose 6 

Quality Points 37 

Readmission, Former Students 29 

Recitals, Student 70 

Recognition 6 

Refunds 21, 22 

Registration 30, 34 

Regulations Concerning Courses 34 

Religion 78 

Religious Life 17 

Religious Organizations 18 

Reports 39 

Residence 17 

Retention of Students 39 

Scholarships 23 

Self-Holp 25 

Silver Shield 19 

Societies, Literary 19 

Sociology 80 

Spanish 59 

S-pecial Students 29 

Speech 56 

Student Government Associatiort 18 

Student Organizations 18-19 

Students, Register of 85 

Students, Special and Part-Time 29 

Summer Session 25, 41 

Teacher's Certificates 51, 52 
Trustees, Board of 7 

Violin 76 

Vocational Preparation 40 

Voice 76 

Withdrawal 41 
(99) 





General Information 

Meredith College, founded by the North Carolina Baptist 
Convention, was granted a charter in 1891, and was Hrst opened 
to students in September, 1S99. It was chartered as the Baptist 
Female University, a name changed in _lQ05 , t o Meredith Col- 
lege. This last name was given in honor ofThomas Meredith, 
for many years n recognized leader of the Baptist di 
lion in North Carolina, who in 11538 presented to the Baptist 
Stale Convention a resolution urging the establishment in or 
near Raleigh of "a female seminary of high order that should 
be modeled and conducted on strictly religious principles, but 
that should be, so far as possible, free from sectarian influ- 
ences." The institution has had four presidents: James Carter 
Blasinganie, 1899-1900; Richard Tilman Vann, 1900-1915; 
Charles Edward Brewer, 1915-1939, Carlyle Campbell, 1939- 
Mcredith's resident enrollment is currently 745. 

Advantages Oftered Students 

Many opportunities for all students to participate in various 
activities . . . 

Close relationship of teacher and student in small classes and 
in the college community . - - 

A liberal education as preparation for a full life . . . 

Capital City location within Intellectual Triangle formed by 
North Carolina Stale College at Raleigh, the University of 
North Carolina at Chajiel Hill, and Duke University at Dur- 



Equipment 



170-aere campus . . . 

Attractive quadrangle composed of administration building 
and library, four dormitories, and dining hall . . . 

Auditorium with scaling capacity of 1,050 , . , 

Classroom building for liberal arts, completed in 1956 . . . 

Classroom building for sciences, completed in 1959 . . , 

Home management house, completed in 1959 . . , 

New dormitory accommodating 100 students, costinc 
S485,000 ... 

New 32.bed infirmary, costing §265,000 . . . 

New amphitheater overlooking four-acre lake . . . 

A "Mul" for informal social activities . . . 

An outdoor swinimina pool , . . 

A riding academy witli 45 horses . . . 

Course of Sludy For Freshmen 

Usually freshmen register for the following courses: English, 
a foreign language, health education, physical education, and 
three couTSL-s chosen from history, mathematics, natural sci- 
ences, and religion. Some variation from this schedule may 
he necessary for students planning to major in art, home eco- 
nomics or music. 



Major Field 

After two years of taking basic liberal arts courses at Mere 
dith a student chooses a major field from the following: 
Art; Biology; Business; Chemistry; Economics; English; 
f'oreign Languages— French, Latin, Spanish; History; Home 
Economics; Mathematics; Music— Church Music, Organ, 
Piano, School Music, Violin, Voice; Psychology; Religion; 
Sociology. 

Teaching Certilicates 

A large percentage of Meredith students qualify each year 
for certificates in secondary and elementary education. Stu- 
dents intending to teach consult their major departments and 
the Department of Education at least by the close of the 
sophomore year. 




MEREDITH COLLEGE 



The purpose of Mcredilh College U to develop in iu students the Christian attitude loward the whole of life, and lo prepare them 
for intelligent ciliicnship, homemaking, graduate study, and for professional and other fields of service. Its intention is to provide 
not only thorough instruction, hut also culture made perfect through the religion of Jesus Christ. These ideals of academic in- 
tegrity and religious influence have always been cherished at Meredith. 





Early Decision Plan 

For the unquestionably well-qualified student who definitely 
desires lo enter Meredith College there is designed an Early 
Decision Plan. Under this plan the applicant must take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and the English Cojnposition Achieve- 
It Test of the College Entrance Examination Board before 
her senior year in high school. She should file application for 
admission to the College, with the appropriate fee, by Septem- 
er 15 of her senior year, requesting in an accompanying letter 
that her application receive an "early decision" and certifying 
thai she is, therefore, applying only to Meredith. On ihe basis 
of Junior year tesl scores, the applicant's three-year high school 
record, together with a notice of courses being pursued in ihe 
senior year and reconitnendalions from school officials, the 
admissions officer will accept the (guahficd applicant by October 
IS of her senior year. Dormitory students will be requesled 
to make an advance payment of S50.00 by November 15. This 
advance payment is not rcfuiidoblc. 



Expenses For 1964-65 

For resident students 
Tuition: instruction, library, lectures and 

recitals, academic administration 
Residence: room and board, laundry, 

fimiary service, maintenance 



Total 



For non-resident students 

Tuition las above) 

Special fees for instruction i 
are listed in the catalogue. 





S 710.00 




640.00 


1 


81,350.00 




S 710.00 


d lior 


scback riding 



Self-Help 

Many students needing financial assistance reduce their e.\- 
penses by parl-lime employment in the dining hall, in tlie 
library, and in various offices and academic departments of the 
college. Compensation, which varies with the character and 
amount of service rendered, usually ranges from S125 lo S250 
for the year. Initial correspondence concerning appointments 
may be addressed to the Business Manager. 



National Defense Student Loan Program 

Meredith College parlicipales in the National Defense Stu- 
dent Loan Program. Information about this loan fund is avail- 
able from high school principals and guidance directors. 
Interested students should write to ihe Business Manager and 
Treasurer, Meredith College. 



Scholarships 

Freshman Scholarships: Fifteen scholarships, valued at S450 
each, and thirty-five scholarships, valued at S250 each, are 
awarded to resident members of the incoming freshman class 
on the basis of outstanding scholastic achievement and promise, 
qualities of social leadership, and financial need. 

The freshman applicant who feels qualified and desires to 
be considered as a scholarship recipient should request a 
Freshman Scholarship Application blank from President Car- 
lyle Campbell, Meredith College. The completed scholarship 
application should accompany or follow the application for 
admission. The application and supporting credentials, which 
are the same credentials used in evaluating the applicant's 
qualifications for admission, should be submitted by Febru- 
ary 15. 

Upper-class Scholarships: Thirty-five scholarships, valued 
al S250 each, are awarded lo resident members of the sopho- 
lorc, junior, and senior classes on the basis staled above. 





MEREDITH 
COLLEGE 



RALEIGH, N. C. 






Summer Session 







JUNE 8 - JULY 18 

1964 




GENERAL INFORMATION 

Dormitory studeuts sliould arrive in time to 
register on Monday, June S. Registration will 
lie lield in the College librnrj', beginning at 
2 :00 p.m. Polent Doruiilory will be used, but 
will not be open until 2;00^p.in. on Sunday, 
June 7. 

Upon an'ival, students will register in tte 
office of the Dean of Students in Jobuson Hall 
before keys are issued by the House Director. 

Higli school graduates and transfer students 
who liave been approved for admission to 
Meredith may complete certain required courses 
during the summer session. Students enrolled 
at other colleges should send (ii adviince a state- 
ment from a college official anthoriKing particular 
courses for credit at Meredith. 

During the, six-week session a student may 
earn a maximum of six semester hours nf 
credit. 

Classes will meet from 7;45 a.m. to 1 :(m 

-.r__ 1 _. ,1 1 f_i....i__ pj;p(,p( J^ily 



asses will meet from 7 ;45 a.. 
Monday Ibrougli Saturday, ■ 



The residence halls provide comfortable liv- 
ing quarters. J[eals will be served in (lie Cn\- 
Icge dining hall. Students will funiiisli (lirlr 
own towels and bed linen (for sintrli" h'lh] 
and miikc their own arrangements for laumlry- 

Recrentional and social programs and weekly 
round table discussions of current affairs arc 
traditional. Buses leave frequently from tln' 
administration building to the business distrief. 
The outdoor swimming pool will he nvailnblo. 




A^^^'^ 
"^^ 



24" 



CALENDAR 

Juiii- 7-8 Sunday anil IMoiulay — Doniit<iry 
t^liidenls arrive brfiire 2:00 p.m. 
Mtinday 

June 8 Moiulay — Registration in lil)rary. 
2:00 p.m. 

June 9 Tuesday — Classes begin 

July 1 Saturday — Holiday 

.[uiy 17 Friday — Examinations 

July 18 Saturday — Summer session 
Connnenccment 



RECOGNITION 

Meredith College, a standard four-year 
college for women, is a member of tlie 
Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, and the Association of American 
( iolleges. Graduates of Meredith are 
eligible for membership in the American 
Assoeiation of University Women. Meredith 
is a Liberal Arts member of the National 
Association of Schools of Music. 




FACULTY AND STAFF 

C.iRLYLE CascpbelLj A.M., LL.D President 

Leisiiman a. Peacock, Pir.D Dean 

Davii. Or.MSTED. R.S., O.P.A.„/Jii.v('(ieM Miinagfr 

Vera Taut Maiisii Registrar 

Ma Beli.k Smith Dean of Students 

H.vzEL Baitv, A.B. in L.S Librarian 

Jane Gheenh. A.B. ix L.S., \M Librarian 

Lit.A Beu.. M.En Education 

Vehoean R. Bikkin, A.AI. 

Sociofoij]! and Orographij 

Edwin- K. BLANCnAiii). Xr.Mis Music 

EitpiEST P. Canaday. Pii.D Mathematics 

J. ITenky Cokfeh, Jr., Tir.M Religion 

llAitBY E. Cooper, Mus.D., F.A.G.O ^fusic 

James H. Eads. Jr., M.S.... Biology 

Alice'R. EniiLicH, A.B Art 

RiCHAiiD D. GoFF, A.M Hi.ftori/ 

Mamie IlAFNErt, A.M English 

QuEKTiN 0. McjVlubtek, Pit.D. Spanish 

Stuaht Pb.vtt. Mus-M Music 

Daviii R. Revei.kv. Pk.D EJiicalion 



EXPENSES 



Tuition (for two courses, giving six 

aomester hours of credit) $100.00 

Residence: room nnd board 05,00 



Special Fees: 

Late registration (after June 8) 3,00 

Tuition for special students, for each 

fhrce-liour course 50.00 

Piano, Organ, Voice (Two lialf-hour 

lessons a week) ."lO.OO 

One Imlf-liour lesson n week 30,00 

Use of piano, one hour daily 3.00 

I'or eacli adiiitional Iiour 2.00 

Use of organ, thirty-five or forty-five 

cents an hour. 



Fees are payable upon registration. NO 
REFUNDS WILL BE ALLOAYED FOR 
■WITHDRATVALS. 



U M M E 



S I O N 



/««e S - gulif. IS, f964 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The number in parentheses following ihc title of ibe course indicates 
the semester hours of credit allowed. The College does not guarantee 
to offer any course listed helow fur which there is not a uiininiuni 
registration of six students. The class schedule printed below is not 



necessarily final. If conflicts are apparent, please indicate preferences 
on the attached application form. Unless otherwise indicated, classes 
meet six days a week for one hour and fifteen minutes each. 



ART 

231. Art Aitprvvialion (3). 7:45 

A course designed lo satisfy the need of 
general students for a key to the under- 
standing of arL rs'ot open to art majors. 
Joyncr 201 il^rs. Ehrlich 

243. Beginning An (3) 9:05-11:40 

A course in the fundamentals of art for 
others than art majors. Consideration of 
the elements and principles of design and 
their application in problems involving 
various art media. 

Joyner 2U5 Mrs. Ehrlich 

BIOLOGY 
101, 102. Gt'neral- Bioloj-y (3 or 6). 
Lecture 101—7:45 Lecture 102—9:05 
Lab. 101 Lab. 102 

10:25-1:00 10:25-1:00 

Mou. and Wed. Tues, and Tliur. 

A course presenting the most important 
biological facts and principles, and so re- 
lating them that the student can apply tbem 
to the ordinary affairs of life. A study of 
protoplasm, the cell, the role of green 
plants, including simple experiments in 
plant physiology, the adjustment of orga- 
nisms lo their environment, and the struc- 
Uire and fuuclions of vertebrates with spe- 
cial reference lo man, conslilules the work 
of the first part. In 102 a study of typical 
animal and plant forms is made as an intro- 
duction to these two kingdoms. Students 
may register for either half of the course, 
or for six hours. 

Hunter Hall Mr. Eads 

EDUCATION 

231. Educational Psyclwloi-y (3). 9:05 
A course intended to be basic to the 

others in the various sequences which give 

directiiin to liic jiriifissioiially trained 

lea die r. 

Joyner 101 Dr. Rcveley 

352. The Secomlary School ( 3 ) . 11 :45 
Organization and administration of the 
liigh school curriculum; methods of plan- 
ning and teaehing; qualifications of the 
high school teacher. 

Joyner 101 Miss Bdl 



Child and Adolescent 
Psychology [3), 



10:25 



A survey of the psychological develop- 
ment of ike individual through childhood 
and adolescence. 



Joyner 101 



Miss Belt 



491. Social Problems in 

Education ( 3 ) . 7 :45 

A review of current problems coiifront- 
ing education in the United States. 



Joyner 101 



Dr. Rcveley 



ENGLISH 
102. Principles of Writing (3). 10:25 
Joyner 107 Miss Hafner 

222, Development of English 

Literature (3). 7:45 

Survey of English literature from Sliake- 
speare to the 19th Century. 

Joyner 107 Miss Hafner 



GEOGRAPHY 

222. Geography of North America (3). 
10:25 



Joyner 236 



Mr. Birkii 



HISTORY 
251. History of the United StfUes to 1865 
' (3). 7:45 

Joyner 126 Mr. Goff 

MATHEMATICS 

101. College Algebra (3). 7:45 
Hunter 218 Dr. Canaday 

102. Trigonometry (3). ]0:25 
Himter 218 Dr. Canaday 



APPLIED MUSIC 

Instruction in organ, piano, and voice 
will he available in private lessons. The 
work will be adjusted to suit the needs of 
each student. College credit will be granted 



for this work on the basis of one semester 
hour for nine hours per week of practice. 
Organ — Dr. Cooper 
Piano — Mr. Pratt 
Voice — Mr. Blanchard 

226. Music Appreciation (3). 11:45 

A course adapted to the needs of the 

general college student. 

Jones 104 Dr. Cooper 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
201. Government of the United States (3 ). 
9:05 
Mr. Goff 



Joyner 126 



RELIGION 

101. An Infrodnrtinn to the Old Testament 

(3). 9:05 

Joyner 238 Mr. Coffer 

102. An Introduction to the i\eiv Testament 

(3). 10:25 

Joyner 238 Mr. Coffer 

SOCIOLOGY 

221. Principles of Sociology (3). 11:45 
Joyner 232 Mr. Birkin 

SPANISH 

221. Intermediate College Spanish (3). 

9:05 
Review of the essentials of the Spanish 
language; composition; intensive oral-aural 
practice; conversational drill. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or 
equivalent. 
Joyner 211 Dr. McAllister 

222. Intermediate College Spanish (3). 

11:45 
Reading and conversation of appropriate 
difficulty. Oral-aural aids used include rec- 
ords, tape recorder, and short wave radio. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 21, or equiv- 
alent, unless tlie student registers 
for the full year's work. 

Joyner 211 Dr. McAllister 

Please fill out the nttaclicd application bliink 
and return before June 1st to 

DEAN L. A. PEACOCK 

Moreditli College 

Raleigh, N. C. 




ill 
<s -s 



The Tnelfth Annual 

Meredith School 

of 
Christian Studies 



Purpose: To bring thoughtful ministers and laymen 
together in study and discussion with leaders who are 
making major, scholarly contributions to Christian life 
and thought. 



June 15-19, 1964 
Monday, 8 p.m. — Friday, 1 p.i 



The program Committee acknowledges with grati- 
tude the generous contributions of interested friends in 
providing for the educational expense of the School. 



PROGRAM COMMITTEE 



Ralph E. McLain, Chairman; Chairman of Depart- 
ment of Religion, Meredith College 



Olin T. BiNKLEY, President, Southeastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary 



Cablyle Campbell, President. Meredith College 



Harold J, Dudley. Executive Secretary, North Caro- 
lina Presbyterian Synod 



Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh, North Carolina 



Richard H. Baker. Bishop of Episcopal Diocese of 
North Carolina 



Carlton S. Prickett, Minister. First Baptist Church, 
Burlington 



General Information 

Location: Meredith College is located on Routes I and 

64 at the western city limits of Raleigh on Hills- , 

boro Street. Lectures will be held in the College ' 

Auditorium. ; 

Rooms: One section of Meredith dormitories will be 
arranged for four men to share a two-room suite 
with connecting bath. Another section of Meredith 
dormitories will be arranged for four women to 
share a two-room suite with connecting bath. There 
will be a section of suites available for husbands 
and wives. All rooms are furiiished with linen, 
towels, and soap. 

Meals: All meals will be served in the College Dining 
Hall. The first meal will be served at 5:30 p.m., 
Monday, and the last meal at 1:00 p.m., Friday, 

Book Display: Through the courtesy of the Baptist Book 
Store of Raleigh, there will be a book exhibit in 
the Auditorium Building where books may be 

purchased. •■ 

Fees: Through the contribution of interested friends 
there will be no fee for the lecture courses. Room 
and board fees are: 

Room and meals per person for 

entire session SIS.OO 

Single meals 75 

Room for one night : 2.00 

Note: Arrangements for single meals and rooms 
for overnight accommodations may be made in 
advance at the Informatiori Table. 

NOTE: That Ibe opening lecture is at 8:00 p.m. 
Monday. 

DAILY CALENDAR 

7:15- 7:45 Breakfast 

9:00- 9:50 Dr. Haroutunian 

9:50-10:15 Rc[reshment.s 

10:15-11:05 .^ .^ Dr. Handy 

1 1:10-12:00 Dr. Jackson 

12:40- 1:20 Lunch 

2:00- 3:00 Informal Discussion 

3:00- 5:00 Recreation 

5:30- 6:00 '. Dinner 

8:00- 9:00 EveninR Lectures 



i/i 

UJ 

a 



X 

u 



OS 

I 

u 
to 



o 

LU 
LU 



MEREDITH SCHOOL OF CHRISTIAN STUDIES 



s 5 



SPECIAL GUIDED TOURS 

For intercslcd persons guided lours of the Research 
Triangle, the State Lcgisialivc Building, and the Art 
Museum will be available on designated afternoons if 
interest in such tours develops. 



AFTERNOON RECREATION 

Golf courses and swimming pools in Raleigh arc 
available. Meredith Library will be open. Air condi- 
tioned Student Supply Store will be open all day and 
will be opened after each evening lecture for refresh- 
ments and informal visiting. A large room with a book 
display will be open for browsing and making purchases. 




JOSEPH H.AROUTUNIAN 
Professor, University of Chicago 

What docs Ihe Chriilian atrirma- 
lion, "The Presence of God wilh 

In Dr, Haroulunian we have one 
of our ablesi, syslemaiic Iheolo- 
grans lo lead US in conlcmporary 
iheological thoughl in this suhjeci. 
He was reared in the home of a 
Professor of Practical Theology at 
the Marash Theological Seminary 
in Marash. Turkey. He received his 
higher education al the American 
University in Bcruii, his B.D. de- 
gree at Union Theological Semi- 
nary in New York, and his Ph.D. 
Degree from Columbia University. 
He has been the recipient of three honorary Doctor of Divinity 
degrees from American and Canadian schools. At present he is 
Professor of Syslemaiic Theology at ihc Divinity School of the 
Universiiy of Chicago. He is ihe author of four books, Ihe 
latest being his translation and editing of Calvin: Commentaries 
for the Library of Christian Classics (1958). 
Theme; The Presence of God wilh Us 
Lectures: 'The Real Presence" of Christ 

The Word of God in the Church 
The Word of Man in the Church 
The Spirit of Cod and ihe Presence of God 
Monday Eveniny: Understanding Ihc Christian Faith 
Thursday Evening: Lecture Title to be Announced 



HERBERT C. JACKSON 
Director, Missionary Research Library 

In our day Chrisll 
are in a threatened, precarious con- 
diiion, but the Christian mission 
is being expressed in surprising 
new channels. Few persons are so 
well qualified to bring us to con- 
front the realities of both of ibese 
situations as is this lecturer. 

Dr. Jackson, Director of the 
Missionary Research Library and 
Adjunct Professor at Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, brings to Ihis 
post Ihe experience and scholarship 
of six years as a missionary in 
southern India, seven years as Pro- 
fessor of Missions and Compara- 
tive Religions at the Southern 
Theological Seminary, a year of study and travel in 
Asia m.-Lde possible by the Seallantic Fund Fellowship in 1958- 
59. Dr. Jackson received his Th.M. Degree al ihe Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary and his Ph.D. Degree at Vale 
Divinity School. 

His most recent publication (1963) is Man Reaches Out to 
Cod: Living Reiiiiions and ilie Clirisiian Missionary Obligation. 
Theme: Crucial Issues in World Mission 
Leclurcs: The Changed Matrix of Mission 

Resurgent Religions, Religious Pluralism, and Mis- 
sionary Activity 

The Ground and Objective of Mission 
New Evidences and Forms of Christian Revival 
Tuesday Evening: God's Mission and Our Task 




B:iplisl 




ROBERT T. HANDY 
Professor, Union Theolosical Seminary 

How much the average church 
member is conscious of the inter- 
play of the Gospel, his church, 
and the pressures of contemporary 
society is a moot question. For the 
theological thinking of our time 
this question has come to be a 
serious concern. Dr, Robert T, 
Handy has come to grips with this 
problem from Ihe vantage point 
of Ihe church historian. 

Dr. Handy received his A.B, 
degree at Brown Universiiy, B.D. 
at Colgalc-Rochesler Divini[y 
School, and his Ph.D. at the Divin- 
ity School of the University of 
Chicago. Ordained to the Baptist 
ministry. Dr. Handy served several years as minister, and then 
as chaplain in the U. S. Army, and returned lo teach Rrst in 
Ihe field of Hislory of Religions and in the Division of Human- 
ities. Since 1950 he has been Professor of Church History at 
Union Theological Seminary where he is also Director of 
Studies. He has served on numbers of committees in his own 
denomination and on the Faith and Order commissions of both 
Ihe National Council of Churches and the World Council of 
Churches. 

Dr. Handy's publications include We Witness Togeiher, 1956; 
Members One of Anoilier, 1959; and American Clirislioniiv, 
two volumes (wilh H. Shelion Smith asd A. Loeischer). 1960-3, 
Theme: The American Experience and the Understanding 

of the Gospel 
Lectures: Religious Pluralism: Perpetual Ferment 

Religious Liberty: Opportunity for Faith or Capitu- 
lation to Necessity? 
The Impact of Individualism 
The Quest tor Unity: American Expedient or 
Christian Imperative? 
Wednesday Evening: Biblical Failh and Popular Religion: a 
Coslrast 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Lecturers were iisked to list Iheir own publication and Ihe 
books they suggest for siudy before, during, and following 
their lectures. 

Professor Haroutunjan 
Niebuhr, H. R., Tlie Responsible Self 
Bonhoeffer. D., Life Togeilier 
Marcel. G.. Crctilivc Fidelity 
Ebeling, G., The Reality of Faith 
Welch, C, The Reality al ihe Church 

Professor Jackson 

Abrechl, P., The Churches and Rapid Social Change 
Cooke, G., As Christians Face Rival Religions 
Blauw, J., The Missionary Nature of ihc Church 
Loftier. P., The Layman Abroad in the Mission of the Church 
Wyon, O., Liying Springs: New Religions Movements in Western 
Europe 

Professor Handy 

Mead, S. E., The Lively Experiment: The Sliaping of Christian- 
ity in America 

Hudson, W. S.. American Proiesianiism 

Smith, J. W. and Jamison, A. L., eds.. The Shaping of Ameri- 
can Religion 

Smith. H. S., Handy, R. T, and Loeischer, L„ American Chris- 
tianity: An Historical Interpretation with Representative 
Documents 




Meredith College Bulletin 



Gift Report Issue 



Series 58 



March, 1963 



Meredith Coik-:3e Libi'c 
Raleigh, NoiUi Cjroliod 
No. 1 




THERE arc few things more enduring than a college. 
Religions may split into sect or heresy. 
Dynasties may perish or be supplanted. 
But for century after century the college will continue. 
And the stream of life will pass through it. 
And the thinker and seeker will be bound together 
In the undying cause of bringing thought into the 
world. 

JOHN MASEFIELD 
University of Sheffield 
June, 1956 







1 




1964 Donors to Meredith College 
Development Program 



To Our Donors: 

On the following pages are printed the names of you whose gifts to 
the Meredith College Development Program hove reached the Col- 
lege in 1964. 

Meredith publicly and officially expresses through this bulletin its 
gratitude to each of you. 

With your continued help, the College will be able to carry on with 
increasing effectiveness its purpose ". . . to develop in its students 
the Christian attitude toward the whole of life, and to prepare them 
for intelligent citizenship, home-making, graduate study, and for 
professional and other fields of service . . ." 



2 




■"'■"■■■ li 1 ■ V i-,ii 



Meredith College 



■•'•^•'-'--■^"-' ^»— 



March 2, 1965 



Friends of Meredith College: 

This is the second annual report to those who have shown a financial inter- 
est in Meredith College. My personal thanks for your expressed confidence in the 
integrity and program of the college, and for the imnnediate help which your con- 
tribution has provided. I hope that it will be an abiding satisfaction to you. 

To say that we no longer need friends would be arrogant; even to imply that 
the material needs of the college have been substantially met would be stupid. U 
wrill not seenn ungenerous, or even surprising, to express the hope for your con- 
tinued support, even as we continually seek to enlist the aid of others. 

Of particular current concern is the urgent need of a library building. When 
Meredith nnovcd to its present site in January, 1926, the library was "temporarily" 
housed on the second floor of a multi-purpose building; there, with one-half of the 
third floor recently made available, it has remained for thirty-nine years. I>uring 
this period our enrollment has more than doubled, and the possible service of a 
library has greatly expanded in importance and variety of functions. 

For some tinne a special committee, composed of nnembers of the faculty 
and of the board of trustees, has been investigating and meeting to decide on the 
facilities to be provided for in this building, now and in the foreseeable future. 
When these studies are complete, we must then plan for financing the construction 
of the building. What it will cost, we cannot now even estimate; but we are de- 
termined that the building must be expressive of Meredith, and we know that it 
will challenge our financial resources and our faith. 

You will hear more about this and other appeals later. In the meantime, 
will you not keep in mind the service and needs of Meredith, and be prepared at 
the proper time to give tangible evidence of your devotion to Meredith and whiit it 
represents? 

Improvements in the appearance and usefulness of the campus and facilities 
are being made continually. Whenever you have an opportunity, we hope that you 
will come to see us. 




I 



Cordially your'i , 

Carlylc Campbell 
fV-' President 



V 



Alumnae Giving More 
More Alumnae Giving 



The initial phase (1963-64) of the Annual Giving plan through the 
Alumnae Division of the Meredith College Development Program 
surpassed its goal of 50% of all alumnae contributing in a given 
year. And in this second annual person-to-person visitation, we're 
happy to report that another promising period of emphasis on 
Meredith is well under way. Of course, we will be completely suc- 
cessful only when all alumnae express tangibly their confidence in 
and appreciation of Meredith as an institution of Christian higher 
education. 

Is the habit of ANNUAL GIVING yours? Remember that your 
gifts may be designated if you wish. We have many donations 
earmarked for the Carlyie Campbell Library, for scholarships, for 
faculty salary increases, for endowment . . . 

Commencement 1965 is the time of appraisal. It is our hope 
that the program will show continued growth, and there is every 
indication that it will. Our thanks to those alumnae who have 
already sent in their gifts. If you haven't, won't you please send 
yours so that you and your contribution will be included in the full 
report to be given on Alumnae Day, May 29? 




Mrs. 
Susan H. Jefferies 

Coordinator 
Alumnae Division 

of the 

Meredith College 

Development 

Program 



Donors for the Year 1964 



ALUMNAE 

contributed 
$36,439.59 



Pat Abernathy 

Mrs. J. B. Adams 

Joy Anne Adams 

Mrs. J. R. Adams 

Mrs. S. L. Adams 

Lynette Adcock 

Mrs. Maurice Adcock 

Mrs. E. E. Adkins 

Mrs Johanna M. Adler 

Alamance Chapter 

Mrs. Paul Albritton 

Mrs. A. Douglas Aldrich 

Mrs. Leion C. Alexander 

Mrs. Neal P. Alexander 

Mrs. Charles E. Alford 

Ora Alford 

Mrs. Burwell Allen 

Mrs. C. W. Allen 

Mrs. Graham B. Allen 

Mrs. James B. Allen 

Mrs. J. LeRoy Allen 

Mrs. John B. Allen 

\larie Louise Allen 

Mrs. O. G. Allen 

Mrs. Robert L. Allen 

Mrs. Annie A. Allred 

Mrs. Fred Allred 

Mrs. J. F. Allred 

Mrs. John D. Alston. II 

Mrs. F. J. Ammons 

Mrs. Justus M. Ammons 

Mrs. Raymond M. Ammons 

Elizabeth Anderson 

Mrs. Glenn B. Anderson 

Mrs. Harold E. Anderson 

Mrs. Leonard E. Anderson 

Mrs. Robert T. Anderson 

Mrs. W. G. Anderson 

Mrs. H. Thomas Andrew 

Frances Marie Andrews 

Mrs. George H. Andrews 

Mrs. George H. Andrews, Jr. 

Mrs. George W. Andrews 

Mrs. Marshall Andrews 

Fannie Mae Ange 

Mrs. D. E. Angel 

Anonymous 

Mrs. Donald K. Applelon 

Mrs. Jerry Frank Arnold 

Mrs. Thurston Arnold 

Mrs. James B. Arthur 

Mrs. Louis H. Asbury, Jr. 

Mrs. G. N. Ashley 

Mrs. Kenneth W. Ashley 



Mrs. W. W. Ashley 
Mrs. Edward R. Askew 
Mrs. Martha L. Askew 
Mrs. Reginald A. Aspden 
Catherine M. Atkins 
Mrs. H. B. Atkins 
Mrs. C. G. Auerswald 
Mrs. D. Glenn Auman 
Mrs. R. N. Aumiller 
Mrs. Thomas B. Austell 
Mrs. J. L. Austin 
Phyllis Austin 
Mrs. Joe Auten 
Mrs. John Avera 
Mrs. B. R. Avent. Jr. 
Mrs. Charles W. Averre, III 
Mrs. John A. Awerdick 
Mrs. Benjamin T. Aycock 
Mrs. Marvin K. Aycock, Jr. 
Mrs. A. Cornelia Ayers 
Mrs. John H. Ayscue 
Mary Ayscue 
Mildred Jean Ayscue 

Mrs. A. M. Baggett 

Mrs. Harold K. Bailey 

Mrs. J. O. Bailey 

Mrs. John Bailey 

Mrs. R. G. Bailey 

Mrs. Raymond Baird 

Hazel Baity 

Mrs. Albert E. Baker 

Mrs. Douglas Baker 

Mrs. Hallie O. D. Baker 

Mrs. Hallie W. Baker 

Mrs. Horace M. Baker, Sr. 

Mrs. Howard Baker 

Mrs. Mary F. Baker 

Mrs. Pembroke Baker 

Mrs. Richard T. Baker 

Mrs. Thomas P. Baker 

Mrs. Vivian B. Baker 

Mrs. Lawrence G. Baldwin 

Mary Baldwin 

Shirley Ballard 

L. Mabel Ballentine 

Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine 

Martha Ballou 

Mrs. Carl C. Bank 

Mrs. Paul K. Banks 

Mrs. T. H. Banks 

Mrs. J. M. Banner 

Mrs. Bobby M. Barbee 

Mrs. A. K. Barber 

Mrs. Madge D. Barber 

Mrs. A. C. Barefoot 

Mrs. Carl Barefoot 

Mrs. Richard S. Bari 

Mrs. A. L. Barker 

Mrs. H. M. Barker 

Nell Barker 

Mrs. Everett Barnard 

Mrs. Carey J. Barnes 

Mrs. H. W. Barnes. Jr. 



Mrs. Lalon L. Barnes, Jr. 

Mrs. P. H. Barnes 

Mrs. D. Kelly Barnett 

Doris Barnett 

Mrs. Francis K. Barnett 

Mrs. James R. Barnett, Jr. 

Ann Barnhardt 

Mrs. Luther Barnhardt 

Geneva Barnhill 

Mrs. James B. Barnhill 

Mrs. L. W. Barnhill 

Mrs. Howard K. Barrett 

Mrs. W. C. Barrett 

Carolyn Barrington 

Mrs. J. Clyde Barrington 

Mrs. Carrington Barrs 

Mrs. William P. Bartlett 

Mrs. George Barton 

Mrs. James A. Bass. Jr. 

Mrs. Burnie W. Batchelor 

Mrs. Hollis Batchelor 

Mrs. Naomi B. Batchelor 

Mrs. W. E. Bateman, Jr. 

Mrs. Jeff Batts 

Mrs. W. G. Batts 

Mrs. C. R. Baucom 

Linda C. Baxter 

Mrs. W. D. Beal 

Mrs. Garland W. Beale 

Mrs. Francis M. Beam 

Mrs. William M. Beamer 

Mrs. Byron Bean 

Mabel Bean 

Mrs. A. F. Beane 

Mrs. John D. Beavans 

Mrs. George M. Beavers. Jr. 

Lydia Beavers 

Mrs. L. P. Beck 

Mrs. Charles Beddingfield 

Dr. Helen D. Bedon 

Mrs. Burton F. Beers 

Mrs. John H. Bell. Jr. 

Martha Brooks Bell 

Mary Alice Bell 

Mrs. Richard S. Belton 

Margaret Benbow 

Mrs. Gwen P. Benjamin 

Mrs, Jack R. Benjamin 

Mrs. Bruce (i. Bennet 

Mrs. H. Kent Bennett 

Mrs. Jack Bennett 

Mrs. Lyndon Bennett 

Peggy Ross Bennett 

Mrs. S. T. Bennett 

Mrs. Bruce W. Benson 

Mrs. Clifton I . Benson. Jr. 

Betsy Benlhall 

Mrs. Burtis Benton 

Mrs. Roger Benton 

Mrs. William L. Benton 

Mrs. E. Dean Bergen 

Mrs. P. E. Berry. Jr. 

Mrs. Eugene Berryhill 

Mrs. Parks I. Berrvhill 



5 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Mrs. James E. Bethea 
Mrs. Wilmer Z. Belts 
Mrs. Richard J. Bickel 
Mrs. W. B. Bierbaum 
Mrs. Richard F. Bigham 
Mrs. Fred H. Billups 
Mrs. L. L. Bingham 
Mrs. George Birkel, Jr. 
Mrs. Carhon Bivens 
Mrs. Hallie J. Bivens 
Carol M. Bizzelle 
Mrs. Shem Blackley, Jr. 
Mrs. May C. Blackstock 
Mrs. R. D. Blake, Jr. 
Mrs. C. Douglas Blanchard 
Mrs. H. P. Bland 
Mrs. Norman L. Blythe 
Mrs. Elizabeth B. Bodkin 
Mrs. Glenn E. Bogasse 
Mrs. Paul B. Boger 
Mrs. Charles R. Boles 
Mrs. William H. Bolick 
Mrs. Joseph A. Bolton 
Mrs. Edward G. Bond 
Mrs. Walter J. Bone 
Mrs. D. H. Boney 
Mrs. J. G. Booe 
Betsy Land Boone 
Mrs. Gray R. Boone 
Mrs. John S. Boone 
Mrs. E. S. Booth, Jr. 
Mrs. Frank K. Borden, III 
Mrs. F. Herbert Borman 
Mrs. James H. Bost 
Mrs. Charles W. Bostian 
Mrs. Karl Eugene Bostian 
Mrs. G. W. Bostick 
Mrs. Joseph Bouchard 
Mrs. Chester W. Bovender 
Barbara Diane Bowers 
Mrs. Frank H. Bowers 
Mrs. Frank N. Bowers 
Mrs. H. C. Bowers, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry C. Bowers, III 
Mrs. Joseph A. Bowling 
Mrs. Pryor B. Bowling 
Mrs. Dale R. Bowne 
Mrs. James E. Boyd, Jr. 
Mrs. William H. Boyd, Jr. 
Beth Boyette 
Mrs. Dan P. Boyette, Jr. 
Mrs. James G. Boyette 
Mrs. Alvah Boyles 
Mrs. D. A. Boyles 
Marjorie Boyles 
Mrs. William O. Bradford 
Mrs. Wiley G. Bradley 
Ruby Lane Bradshaw 
Mrs. Earl Bradsher, Jr. 
Mrs. E. G. Brady 
Mrs. John B. Brady 
Mrs. Thomas G. Brady, Jr. 
Mrs. Albert Bragdon 
Mrs. W. B. Bragg 



Mrs. David L. Bramlett 
Mrs. Harry A. Branch 
Mrs. George Brannan 
Mrs. J. C. Brantley 
Mrs. Ralph Brashear 
Mrs. Reid M. Brawley 
Mrs. Hazel B. Breeze 
Ann Eliza Brewer 
Ellen D. Brewer 
Mrs. Bill Brewer 
Mrs. Coy E. Brewer 
Mrs. Sophie K. Brewer 
Mrs. Brenda Kay Brickhouse 
Mrs. D. H. Bridger 
Mrs. J. A. Bridger 
Mrs. R. L. Bridger 
Mrs. Robert C. Bridger, Jr. 
Mrs. Gary B. Bridgers 
Mrs. G. R. Bridges 
Mrs. W. D. Briggs 
Margaret Bright 




Mrs. S. E. Briley 

Myra Bristol 

Mrs. Donald E. Britt 

Evelyn L. Britt 

Mrs. George M. Britt 

Mrs. J. B. Britt 

Anne E. Britton 

Mrs. J. O. Broadwell 

Mrs. Avery Brock 

Betty Lou Brock 

Maude E. Brock 

Mrs. Anne A. Brooks 

Clarissa Brooks 

Mrs. Clyde L. Brooks 

Mrs. T. J. Brooks 

Mrs. William M. Brooks 

Mrs. Robert K. Brotherton 

Mrs. Talmadge F. Broughton 

Mrs. Brevard Brown 

Elsie Brown 

Mrs. Fred J. Brown, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry A. Brown 

Mrs. H. L. Brown 

Mrs. Hobart Brown 

Mrs. Hoyt V. Brown 

Mrs. J. Russell Brown 

Mrs. L. E. Brown 

Mary Ann Brown 

Mrs. Nelson E. Brov/n 

Mrs. Ollie M. Brown 

Mrs. Oscar H. Brown 

Mrs. R. G. Brown 

Mrs. Sam Brown 

Mrs. Wesley P. Brown 

Mrs. Owens H. Browne 

Mrs. R. G. Brownfield 

Mrs. John R. Browning 

Mrs. Sarah W. Bruin 

Mrs. Carr Bruton 

Mrs. Charles Ives Bryan 

Mrs. F. S. Bryan 

Mrs. J. N. Bryan 

Mrs. John C. Bryan 

Mrs. P. Rand Bryan 

Sara Gwynn Bryan 

Mrs, W. M. Bryan 

Patricia Ann Bryant 

Mrs. Hilery E. Bryson 

Mrs. E. W. Buchanan 

Mrs. Virginia F. Buckner 

Mrs. James F. BufFaloe 

Mrs. L. A. Buffaloe 

Mrs. Alton L. Bullard 

Mrs. M. E. Bullard 

Mrs. T. P. Bullard 
C. S. Bullock 
Hoke E. Bullock 

Mrs. John A. Bullock, Sr. 

Mrs. Helen G. Bulluck 

Jane Bumpass 

Mrs. John T. Bunn 

Mrs. Tom Bunn 

Nancy Bunting 

Mrs. Stephen R. Burch 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 



6 



Dr. Blanche T. Burchard 

Dr. Elva Burgess 

Mrs. Louise Burgess 

Mrs. Walter C. Burgess 

Mrs. James D. Burroughs 

Mrs. Julian C. Burroughs, Jr. 

Nancy Jane Burroughs 

Mrs. C. Tucker Burruss 

Mrs. Ralph L. Burt 

Mrs. James L. Burton 

Mrs. James L. Burton, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert Burton 

Mrs. Robert L. Burton 

Mrs. Robert M. Burts 

Mrs. A. L. Butler 

Mrs. B. J. Butler 

Mrs. James H. Butler 

Mrs. J. F. Butler 

Mrs. J. M. Butler, Jr. 

Lucy H. Butler 

Sandra Jo Butler 

Mrs. Allen L. Byrd 

Mrs. Earl J. Byrd 

Evelyn Byrd 

Mrs. F. H. Byrd 

Mrs. G. B. Byrd 

Mrs. Fred M. Byerly 

Mrs. Zachary T. Bynum, Jr. 

Mrs. William A. Byrum 

Mrs. Bob Callahan 

Mrs. R. J. Callahan 

Mrs. R. F. Callaway 

Mrs. Robert Caldwell 

Mrs. Anne H. Campbell 

Mrs. E. Hoke Campbell 

Mrs. Frank Campbell 

Mrs. Clyde Cannada 

Mrs. Armstrong F. Cannady 

Mrs. Richard L. Cannon, Jr. 

Mrs. Aaron W. E. Capel, II 

Mrs. Leon Capel, Sr. 

Mrs. Kirk D. Carawan 

Emily Carney 

Mrs. J. W. Carpenter 

Mrs. Tom Carpenter 

Mrs. Wallace Carpenter 

Mrs. Robert F. Carr 

Mrs. A. O. Carraway 

Mrs. C. W. Carrick 

Mrs. S. M. Carrington 

Mrs. Adger B. Carroll 

Mrs. James C. Carroll 

Mrs. John D. Carroll 

Mrs. Phillip E. Carroll 

Mrs. Jesse C. Carson, Jr. 

Amy L. Carter 

Mrs. J. M. Carter 

Mrs. Thomas D. Carter 

Mrs. John Cartncr 

Mrs. J. L. Carver 

Mrs. Virginia C. Carver 

Sylvia Ann Cash 

Mrs. Philip Cashman 

Mrs. Basil B. Castellow 




Mrs. W. Redford Cate 

Joyce Causey 

Mrs. J. Paul Caveness 

Mrs. Jack Chaffin 

Sara Ann Chandler 

Mrs. Harold V. Chartley 

Mrs. John M. Cheek 

Mrs. Ray A. Chesnutt 

Mrs. William N. Childress 

Anita M. Childrey 

Mrs. Charles Childrey 

Mrs. Carl R. Christianson 

Mrs. Hugh Choate 

Mrs. Charles E. Cimerro 

Mrs. Irwin Clark 

Mrs. James P. Clark 

Mrs. James W. Clark 

Mrs. Lawrence C. Clark, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter Clark 

Mrs. Walter E. Clark 

Mrs. Walter M. Clark 

Mrs. Robert E. Clarke 

Class of 1954 

Class of 1955 

Class of 1957 

Class of 1962 

Class of 1964 

Mrs. A. C. Claussen, Jr. 

Mrs. Ivey L. Clayton 

Mary Jo Clayton 

Mrs. Waller Clayton 

Mrs. H. C. Clegg, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry C. Clegg 

Mrs. John M. Clement 

Mrs. Harry B. Clements 

Mrs. Edward C. Cleveland 

Mrs. R. Joe Cline 

Mrs. James E. Clontz 

Mrs. James I.. Clyburn 

Mrs. Fred D. Cobb 

Mrs. Bob Cochran 

Mrs. Eugene R. Cocke 

Mrs. Roland M. Cocker 

Mrs. F. W. B. Cocnen 



Mrs. James C. Coffey 
Mrs. James Cole 
Mrs. Walter B. Cole 
Mrs. Edward Coleman 
D. Joyce Collie 
Mrs. John B. Collins 
Rose Collins 
Mrs. Sturges Collins 
Mrs. Newton V. Colston 
Mrs. A. B. Combs 
Mrs. Herbert Combs 
Mrs. J. W. Comer 
Mrs. Burch C. Compton 
Mrs. K. L. Compton 
Mrs. Fred J. Cone 
Mrs. Ann Taylor Conner 
Mrs. Walter C. Connor 
Mrs. B. E. Connor 
Mrs. Bruce Connor 
Mrs. Hally H. Conrad 
Mrs. Clarence Conyers 
Mrs. Earl R. Cook 
Mrs. John E. Cook 
Mrs. T. A. Cook 
Mrs. W. B. Cook 
Mrs. Sidney B. Cooke 
Mrs. T. A. Cooke 
Mrs. Harvey R. Cooley 
Gwendolyn Cooper 
Mrs. John C. Cooper, Jr. 
Mrs. Miles Robert Cooper 
Mrs. R. Lawrence Cooper 
Mrs. Smith Cooper 
Mrs. William C. Cooper 
Mrs. William C. Cooper, Jr. 
Mrs. W. T. Cooper 
Mrs. Eddie Copeland 
Mrs. Eric Copeland 
Mary Lee Copeland 
Hallie Coppcdgc 
Mrs. H. S. Corbin 
Mrs. Leonard G. Corby 
Mrs. R. W. Cording 
Mrs. Roger F. Corey 



7 



Donors for the Year 1964 




Mrs. Phillip W. Corner 

Melinda Corpening 

Mrs. Jack C. Coss 

Eleanor B. Cothran 

Mrs. E. Harvey Gotten 

Mrs. A. Y. Cottrell 

Mrs. Ray J. Couch 

Mrs. Kenneth R. Coulter 

Mrs. Joel W. Council 

Eleanor Covington 

Mrs. Furman P. Covington 

Georgia Cowan 

Mrs. A. L. Cox 

Mrs. Ben Cox 

Carol Coxe 

Dora B. Cox 

Dora E. Cox 

Mrs. D. R. Cox 

Mrs. D. R. Cox, Jr. 

Mrs. M. G. Cox 

Mrs. W. J. Grain 

Mrs. Ed M. Cranford 

Mrs. James M. Cranford 

Mrs. Samuel D. Cranford 

Susanne Craven 

Mrs. James D. Crawford 

Mrs. Mary Judith Crawford 

Mrs. Walter C. Crawford 

Mrs. Claudius E. Creason, Jr. 

Mrs. B. B. Creech 

Mrs. O. R. Creech 

Mrs. A. R. Creekmore 

Mrs. T. D. Crews 

Mrs. John Crider 

Mrs. R. A. Critcher, Jr. 

Mrs. Harry J. Crow 

Mrs. E. A. Crowther 

Mrs. Jack Grum 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Crutchfield 

.Mrs. Irvin W. Gubine, 11 



Mrs. J. Thomas Culbreath 
Mrs. David Cullins 
Mrs. Dwight W. Cumbee 
Mrs. Larry Cunningham 
Jeannette Current 
Mrs. Billy R. Currin 
Gladys Currin 
Mrs. Henry W. Cutchin 
Mrs. H. G. Cuthrell 

Mrs. Frank D. Dabney 
Martha C. Dail 
Mrs. B. Ed Dale, Jr. 
Mrs. T. L. Dale 
Mrs. A. G. Daniel 
Mrs. Elmer R. Daniel 
Mrs. Frances J. Daniel 
Mrs. George Daniel 
Mrs. G. R. Daniel 
Helen F. Daniel 
Mrs. H. T. Daniel 
Mrs. Ted Daniel 
Mrs. H. D. Daniels 
Mrs. James Danser 
Miriam Daughtry 
Berma Jean Davenport 
Mrs. G. R. Davenport 
Gene Davenport 
Mrs. J. Paul Davenport 
Mrs. L. L. Davenport 
Addie E. Davis 
Mrs. Charles Davis 
Mrs. Daniel S. Davis 
Mrs. Daniel S. Davis, Jr. 
Mrs. E. L. Davis. Jr. 
Mrs. G. Priestly Davis 
Mrs. Harold Davis 
Mrs. H. L. Davis 
Mrs. James Clayton Davis 
Mrs. J. Neal Davis 



Mrs. Joel H. Davis, Jr. 

Mrs. John Charles Davis 

Mary Lou Davis 

Mrs. Reeves K. Davis 

Mrs. W. A. Davis 

Edna Frances Dawkins 

Mrs. Howard G. Dawkins 

Mrs. Bobby F. Day 

Phebe Day 

Mrs. Perry L. Deal 

Mrs. Carl B. Dean 

Mrs. Mona F. Horton Dean 

Phyllis Ann Dean 

Mrs. Floyd Deaton 

Mrs. Charles H. Debnam 

Mrs. James L. Decker 

Mrs. E. B. Deese, Jr. 

Mrs. Louis R. deGuevara 

Dr. Annie Dove Denmark 

Mrs. Florence V. Denmark 

Mrs. H. A. Dennis 

Doris DeVault 

Gladys Dewar 

Susan Dewar 

Mrs. William B. Dewar 

Ann DeWitt 

Mrs. William E. Dickerson, Jr. 

Mrs. William M. Dickerson 

Mrs. Calvin L. Dickinson 

Mrs. William G. Dicksey 

Mrs. H. B. Dickson 

Lulie Dickson 

Mrs. Kenneth C. Diehl 

Mrs. P. McNeer Dillon, Jr. 

Mrs. John D. Divers 

Mrs. David Dixon 

Mrs. George C. Dixon 

Mrs. Hubert G. Dixon 

Mrs. Thomas A. Dixon 

Vera K. Dixon 



8 



Mrs. William J. Dixon, Jr. 

Mrs. G. W. Dobbin 

Mrs. Oscar T. Dobbs 

Mrs. John R. Dobson 

Mrs. J. Richard Dobson 

Mrs. Troy A. Doby 

Mrs. A. G. Donaldson 

Mary M. Dorsett 

Dr. Elizabeth J. Dotterer 

Mrs. J. K. Doughton 

Mrs. John D. Dove 

Mrs. Victor S. Dowd 

Mrs. W. B. Dowell 

Mrs. Charles M. Dozier 

Lillian Draughan 

Verna N. Dryden 

Mrs. E. J. Duckworth 

Nancy R. Duckworth 

Mrs. J. W. Duke, Jr. 

Mrs. V. Duke Duncan 

Mrs. Malcolm Dunkley 

Mrs. Ashby Dunn 

Mrs. Elizabeth Bridger Dunn 

Marie Hope Dunn 

Mrs. Sam A. Dunn 

Mrs. Joseph L. Dupree 

Mrs. Albert Durham 

Mrs. C. H. Durham 

Mrs. James R. Durham 

Mrs. R. L. Eagles 
Mrs. Bruce H. Eaker 
Mrs. P. M. Eames 
Mrs. J. H. Early 
Mrs. Virgil Early, Jr. 
Mrs. William H. Early 
Mrs. G. R. Easley 
Mrs. J. Allen Easley 
Mrs. Carolyn C. Easter 
Mrs. H. Leo Eddleman 
Mrs. C. O. Eddy 
Mrs. Lacy G. Edgerton 
Dr. Lois Edinger 
Mrs. Donald T. Edwards 
Mrs. J. C. Edwards 
Mrs. John A. Edwards 
Mrs. J. Paul Edwards 
Mrs. J. S. Edwards 
Mrs. J. T. Edwards, Jr. 
Rosemary Edwards 
Mrs. S. R. Edwards 
Mrs. Thomas H. Edwards 
Mrs. T. L Edwards 
Mrs. Van E. Edwards 
Mrs. Wayne Edwards 
Mrs. Willie l.cc Edwards 
Mrs. Herbert S. Egbert 
Mrs. Tom D. Eilers 
Mrs. Robert D. Elinor 
Annie I.. Elkins 
I'Isie Elkins 
Mrs. Joe Y. Ellington 
Mrs. James C. Elliott 



Mrs. R. J. Elliott 

Mrs. T. W. Elliott 

Mrs. William K. Elliott 

Mrs. E. W. Ellis 

Mary Ellen Ellis 

Mrs. R. A. Ellis 

Mrs. R. C. Ellis, Jr. 

Mrs. William Y. Ellis 

Mrs. William T. Ellsworth 

Frances Elrod 

Mrs. E. W. Emory 

Barbara Sue Ennis 

Lena Epps 

Mrs. Harold Ernst 

Margaret A. Y. Ervin 

Mrs. William H. Etheridge 

Linda Gale Evans 

Nancy Evans 

Mrs. T. Edwin Evans, Jr. 

Mrs. B. B. Everett 

Mrs. Charles A. Everett 

Mrs. D. C. Ewing 

Mrs. Archie B. Faires 
Mrs. J. D. Fallon 
Mrs. Boyd P. Falls 
Mrs. G. C. Fanney 
Mrs. Foy J. Farmer 
Mrs. Robert C. Farmer 
Mrs. Joe R. Farned 
Mrs. Charles A. Farrell 
Mrs. W. L Farrell 
Mrs. Grace C. Farrior 
Hester Farrior 
Mrs. Julian W. Farrior 
Mrs. Maurice Farrior 
Minnie D. Farrior 
Mrs. William H. Farrior 
Mrs. James D. Farthing 
Mrs. J. Grady Faulk 
Mrs. Wilbur L. Fay 
Mary Eugenia Feathcrston 
Mrs. David Felmet 
Ina L. Ferrell 
Mrs. Lucile D. Ferrell 
Mrs. Richard H. Ferrell 
Mrs. George M. Ferry 




Mrs. Charles W. Finch 
Mrs. James H. Finch 
Mrs. Jean W. Finch 
Mrs. L. A. Finch. Jr. 
Mrs. Elmo Fish, Jr. 
Peggy Joyce Fish 
Mrs. Talmadge Fish 
Mrs. John F. Fisk, IV 
Gertrude E. Fitzgerald 
Sue Fitzgerald 
Mrs. Hugh Fitzpatrick 
Louise Fleming 
Mrs. Joseph Flosman 
Mrs. James S. Florence, Jr. 
Mrs. Lynwood H. Flowers 
Mrs. Edwin O. Floyd 
Mrs. F. O. Floyd 
Sarah Floyd 
Mrs. S. S. Flythe 
Betsy Forbes 

Mrs. John G. Formy-Duval 
Forsyth County Chapter 
Mrs. Jack B. Fortune 
Mrs. Gilbert G. Foster 
Mrs. David W. Fowler 
Mrs. James Robert Fowler 
Mrs. Albert Fox 
Mrs. El ford Fox 
Eva Mae Foxworth 
Mrs. John C. Foy 
Mrs. James Francis 
Mrs. John W. Franklin 
Mrs. Ernest Frazier 
Mrs. J. R. Frazier, Jr. 
Mrs. Donald G. Freeman 
Mrs. F, P. Freeman, Sr. 
Mrs. Lidie P. Freeman 
Mary Freeman 
Mrs. R. N. Freeman 
Mrs. James C. French 
Mrs. Harry C. Frick 
Mrs. Gilbert G. Frommclt 
Mrs. S. W. Front is 
Mrs. Norman E. Frost 
Mrs. David H. Fuller 
Mrs. Vircinia H. Fuller 
Mrs. Walter Fuller. Jr. 
Mrs. William C. Fuller 
Mrs. Bill Russell Eulp 
Mrs. Phillip D. Fulton 
Elizabeth K. Fuqua 
Mrs. Leon M. Fuqua v 
Mrs. J. B. Futrell 
Mrs. J. R. Fulrell 
Louise Fulrell 

Mrs. J. H. Gabriel 

Bessie Gaddy 

Mrs. Claude F. daddy 

Mrs. Herbert F. Gale 

Rulh Gallowav 

Mrs. Odie Gal! 

Mrs. C. Philip Gamble 

Mrs. Marion E. Gambrcll 



9 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Mrs. M. R. Garber 

Mrs. Oscar N. Garcia 

Mrs. Charles Evans Gardner 

Mrs. E. Norfleet Gardner 

Mrs. William R. Garland 

Joyce C. Garner 

Mrs. M. B. Garrett 

Nita Garrett 

Mrs. Ray Garris 

Mrs. Charles H. Garrison 

Mrs. Emily B. Garrison 

Mrs. Evelyn C. Garrison 

Mrs. H. C. Garvey 

Helen Garvey 

Marjorie G. Gash 

Mrs. John F. Gaston 

Mrs. Perry H. Gaston 

Mrs. J. S. Gates, Sr. 

Mrs. Sterling Gates 

Lilmar Sue Gatlin 

Mrs. John A. Gay 

Mrs. Joseph D. Gay 

Mrs. Charles M. Gaylord 

Mrs. E. McP. Geddie 

Mrs. Edward J. Gehrke 

Mrs. Joseph W. Gentry 

Mrs. J. Sam Gentry 

Mrs. Alvis O. George 

Mrs. Anthony Gervasi 

Mrs. James H. Getzen 

Mrs. Donald J. Gibb 

Mrs. Edward L. Gibbon, Jr. 

Eleanor Gibbs 

Mrs. A. Lee Gibson 

Mrs. Charles H. Gibson 

Mrs. Earl S. Gibson 

Mrs. Milton R. Gibson 

Patricia Sue Gilbert 

Mrs. Bond Gillam 

Mrs. Kenneth L. Gilland 

Kathleen Gilleland 

Mrs. Charles B. Gillespie, Jr. 

LeDhu Gillespie 

Mrs. William D. Glance 

Mrs. George G. Glass 

Frances K. Glenn 

Mrs. Joseph H. Glenn, III 

Mrs. Charles F. Glover 

Lucinda H. Glover 

Mrs. James R. Gobble 

Betty Godwin 

Mrs. Duke Godwin 

Elizabeth S. Godwin 

Mrs. Ethel Frye Godwin 

Mrs. Harvey S. Godwin 

Mrs. Lloyd Godwin 

Nancy L. Godwin 

Mrs. William T. Goines 

Mrs. J. Milton Gold 

Mrs. Frank Goldsmith 

Mrs. Richard Goldsmith 

Mrs. Allan M. Goldston 

Mrs. Willard R. Golsan 

Mrs. W. E. Goode 



Mrs. F. P. Goodman 
Mrs. J. P. Goodman 

Mrs. Carl Goodwin 
Mrs. Duke Goodwin 
Judy Goodwin 
Mrs. Kent Goodwin 
Mrs. R. D. Goodwin 
Mrs. William S. Goodwin 
Mrs. Alan W. Gordon 
Mrs. John B. Gordon 
Mrs. Walter Gordy 
Arabella Gore 
Mrs. Arthur D. Gore 
Mrs. Hugh Thomas Gore 
Mrs. Robert P. Gorrell 
Minnie S. Gosney 
Lina M. Gough 
Mrs. J. T. Gould 
Mrs. C. W. Grandy 
Mrs. George R. Grant 
Mrs. Lloyd B. Grant 
Mrs. W. W. Grant 
Mrs. N. B. Grantham 
Katherine Gravett 
Mrs. Barbara B. Gray 
Mrs. James W. Gray 
Alda Grayson 
Mrs. Allen J. Green 
Mrs. Frank Green 
Mrs. H. H. Green 
Mrs. James F. Greene 
Mrs. P. Y. Greene 
Mrs. Paul Grier 
Mrs. George J. Griffin 
Mrs. Irvin C. Griffin 
Lois Elaine Griffin 
Mrs. M. V. Griffin 
Mrs. Ollis D. Griffin 
Mrs. Lloyd E. Griffith, Jr. 
Mrs. Lloyd K. Griffith 
Mrs. Glenn Grigg, Jr. 
Mae Grimmer 
Mary Ann Grimshaw 
Mrs. Archie Grimsley 
Edna Grubbs 
Nancy Gulledge 
Crissie L. Gurkin 
Mary S. Gurley 
Mrs. William B. Gurley 
Mrs. Bruce Gustafson 
Mrs. Clarence H. Guthrie 



Mrs. Edwin M. Hadley 
Mrs. Carol G. Hager 
Mrs. Harold H. Haine 
Mrs. Bruce T. Hainley 
Mrs. Bryan Haislip 
Mrs. Allan Hall 
Mrs. Carlton W. Hall 
Mrs. Cecil B. Hall 
Mrs. C. T. Hall 
Mrs. David H. Hall, Jr. 
Mrs. George W. Hall 



Mary Ella Hall 

Nancy M. Hall 

Mrs. Tom Hall 

Mrs. William S. Hall 

Mrs. Marion A. Ham 

Mrs. H. R. Hamilton 

Margaret K. Hamilton 

Mrs. H. G. Hammett 

Mrs. Henry C. Hammond 

Mrs. W. Easley Hamner 

Dorothy E. Hampton 

Mrs. William S. Hampton 

Carol Hamrick 

Mrs. E. L. Hamrick 

Mrs. F. B. Hamrick 

Mrs. G. S. Hamrick 
Mrs. Larry D. Hamrick 

Mrs. Pauline O. Hamrick 
Mrs. H. A. Hance 
Martha H. Hanford 

Katharine Harden 
Mrs. W. K. Harding 
Mrs. Ben Ira Hardison 
Mrs. William R. Hardison 
Mrs. R. J. Hare 
Mrs. Albert W. Hargrove 
Mrs. Allen Harless, Jr. 
Mrs. W. R. Harmon, Jr. 
Mrs. Fayette Harned 
Mrs. Eugene F. Harper 
Lillie Harper 
Mrs. Robert N. Harper 
Mrs. Billy N. Harrell 
Mrs. Ralph W. Harrell 
Mrs. Howard Harrelson 
Mrs. Lewis Harrelson 
Mrs. L. R. Harrill 
Sandra Gayle Harrill 
Mrs. H. E. Harrington 
Annie W. Harris 
Mrs. Carl V. Harris 
Mrs. Charles C. Harris 
Mrs. David W. Harris 
Elizabeth Harris 
Mrs. Everett G. Harris 
Mrs. Herbert K. Harris 
Mrs. Thomas G. Harris 
Mrs. Charles M. Harrison 
Mrs. Earl Harrison, Jr. 
Mrs. Karl L. Harrod 
Mrs. Alice C. Hart 
Mrs. Gary Harthcock 
Mrs. H. G. Hartis 
Mrs. Robert W. Hartley 
Mrs. Robert W. Hartley, Jr. 
Freda Hartness 
Mrs. Bruce V. Hartsell 
Mrs. Jack B. Hartung 
Mrs. James R. Harward, Jr. 
Mrs. Kvle E. Haselden 
Mrs. Albert L. Haskins 
Mrs. A. M. Hasty 
Mrs. E. B. Hatch 
Mrs. George Hatch 



10 



Mrs. Henry M. Hatcher 
Mrs. W. T. Hatfield 
Mrs. Everette E. Hatley 
Mrs. John R. Hauser 
Mrs. George S. Havener 
Mrs. James K. Hawthorne 
Mrs. Addie Y. Hayes 
Mrs. H. Vernon Hayes 
Mrs. James M. Hayes, Jr. 
Mrs. A. J. Haynes 
Dr. French Haynes 
Mrs. Egbert L. Haywood 
Elizabeth Haywood 
Frances Haywood 
Mrs. W. F. Haywood 
Mrs. George L. Headley 
Carol Heck 

Mrs. Edna M. Hedgepeth 
Mrs. R. A. Hedgepeth, Jr. 
Mrs. Jesse D. Heffinger 
Mrs. Wiliam H. Heilman 
Amy Heinzerling 
Mrs. Bernard Helms 
Mrs. Sidney A. Hempley 
Mrs. Bill Henderson 
Mrs. C. D. Henderson 
Mrs. D. E. Henderson 
Mrs. Jesse J. Henderson 
Mrs. John I.. Henderson 
Mrs. Walter G. Henderson 
Mrs. 'William Henderson 
Mrs. Edward Hendrick 
Mrs. R. O. Hendrick 
Mrs. John T. Henley 
Mrs. Mary I.. Henley 
Mrs. George A. Henry 
V!rs. Richard L. Hensdale 
Mrs. Clarence E. Hcnson 
Bettic Page Herbert 
Mrs. W. Paul Herman 
Margaret Hcrndon 
Annie Mildred Herring 
Mrs. Elbert N. Herring 
Mrs. George D. Herring 
Harriet L. Herring 
Mary Herring 
Nonie Herring 
Mrs. H. D. Hester 
Mrs. John W. Hester 
Mrs. Gene W. Hewitt 
Mrs. C. W. Hewlett 
Carroll Ann Hicks 
Mrs. James Dwight Hicks 
Mrs. Joe R. High 
Mrs. Ruth II. Hiuh 
Mrs. P. H. Highfill 
Virginia Highfill 
Mrs. Bob Freeman Hill 
Elizabeth I ec Hill 
Mrs. J. J. Hill 
Mrs. Myron T. Hill 
Mrs Scolt B. Hill 
I. aura Mac Hilliard 
Mrs. William F. Hillior 



Mrs. Valeria Ruth Hills 

Mrs. F. W. Hobbs 

Mrs. W. A. Hocult 

Blanche Hodge 

Mrs. Ray Hodge 

Anne Palmer Hodges 

Mrs. Tommy Hodgin 

Mrs. Paul Hodul 

Mrs. G. E. HolTman 

Mrs. Herbert Hoff'man 

Mrs. Joseph Hogan 

Jerrly I.ou Holbert 

Mrs. Roy R. Holdford, Jr. 

Mrs. C. F. Holland 

Mrs. Charlie C. Holland 

Mrs. Chester Holland 

Mrs. George H. Holland, Jr. 

Mrs. Jack C. Holland 

Mrs. R. C. Holland 

Mrs. A. J. Holliday 

Mrs. O. L. Holliday 

Mrs. J. H. Hollingsworth 

Mrs. W. C. Hollingsworth 

Mrs. Vivian E. Hollinshed, Jr. 

Betty Jean Hollis 

Mrs. E. H. Holloman 

Mrs. J. I.eith Holloway 

Lilly Holloway 

Virginia Lee Holloway 

Minnie Hollowell 

Mrs. Malcolm L. Holmes, Jr. 

Mrs. Dallas Holoman, Jr. 

Mrs. R. F. Holsclaw 

Mrs. Edgar E. Holt 

Mrs. J. Edgar Holt 

Mrs. W. Wade Homesley 

Mrs. Chester A. Honeycutt, Jr. 

Mrs. Harold Honeycutt 

Betty L. Hood 

Mrs. John C. Hood 

Mrs. J. I.. Hooker 

Mrs. Theron G. Hooks 

Mrs. Sidney F. Hoots 

Mrs. Lindsey Hopkins 

Mrs. W. Conrad Hopkins 

Mrs. Edmund C. Horgan 

Connie Home 

Mrs. Carlyle Horner 

Mrs. K. C. Horner 

Mrs. George C. Hoskins 

Mrs. H. E. Hosncr 

Mrs. W. A. Hough. Jr. 

Margaret Houghton 

Mrs. John C. House 

Nancy House 

Mrs. Ray W. House 

Mrs. Louis S. Hovis 

Bonnie Howard 

Mrs. Charles B. Howard 

Frances Ann Howard 

Mrs. John T. Howard 

LcIIic J. Howard 

Mamie Lee Howard 

Mrs. Scarlett H. Howard 




Mrs. G. E. Howell 
Mrs. Lillian P. Howell 
Mrs. Thomas R. Howerton 
Mrs. James H. Howey 
Ruth A. Hubbell 
Mrs. Robert H. Hudgins 
Mrs. Charles H. Hudson 
Mrs. Clay I. Hudson 
Mrs. Lawrence W. Hudson 
Mary I ouise Hudson 
Mrs. Shirla G. Hudson 
Mrs. Worth Hudson 
Mrs. Jay B. Huff 
Mrs. Charles E. Huffman 
Mrs. George R. Hughes 
Mrs. Julian Hughes 
Mrs. Robert H. Hughes 



11 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Mrs. James E. Hull 
Mrs. W. F. Humbert, III 
Mrs. Donald H. Humphrey 
Alice G. Hunsucker 
Mrs. James Sidney Hunt 
Mrs. Kathleen C. Hunter 
Mrs. Thomas Hunter 
Mrs. Samuel H. Husbands 
Mrs. J. P. Huskins 
Mrs. Minnie M. Hussey 
Mrs. J. E. Hutcherson 

Mrs. Frederick B. Igler 
Mrs. Grady Inscoe 
Mrs. Leslie N. Ipock 
Mrs. E. Johnston Irvin 
Mrs. Richard N. Irvin 
Mrs. E. Filmore Irwin 
Mrs. G. E. Isaacs 
Mrs. John Isenhour 
Mrs. R. W. Isley 
Mrs. William A. Ivey 

Mrs. Ralph Jacks 

Mrs. A. H. Jackson, Jr. 

Annie Marie Jackson 

Mrs. Betty W. Jackson 

Mrs. C. A. Jackson 

Mrs. Catherine J. Jackson 

Mrs. Judson G. Jackson 

Kathleen Jackson 

Theta Jackson 

Mrs. W. A. Jackson 

Mrs. Waldo J. Jackson 

Mrs. Charles N. James 

Mrs. Earl C. James 

Hilda James 

Mrs. Hinton James, Jr. 

Mrs. Murray James 

Mrs. Ray B. James 

Mrs. Stephen H. James 

Sue Anne James 

Mrs. Worth M. Jarrett 

Mrs. Jimmy L. Jay 

Mrs. W. E. Jeffcoat 

Mrs. Susan H. Jefferies 

Bobbie Lynne Jeffords 

Mrs. Charles W. Jeffries 

Mrs. George L. Jenkins 

Mrs. Jim Jenkins 

Mrs. W. C. Jenkins 

Mrs. William A. Jenknis 

Mrs. H. H. Jobe 

Mrs. Beverly M. Johnson 

Mrs. Boyette H. Johnson 

Clara Johnson 

Mrs. David Ray Johnson 

Mrs. E. D. Johnson 

Frances L. Johnson 

Mrs. Fred B. Johnson, Jr. 

Mrs. George Herbert Johnson 

Mrs. Harold R. Johnson 

Mrs. H. E. Johnson 



Mrs. J. Don Johnson 
Mrs. J. Eulan Johnson 
Mrs. J. P. Johnson 
Judy Johnson 
Mrs. K. L. Johnson 
Mrs. Lee Johnson 
Mrs. Leroy Johnson 
Mrs. Mary Lucille Johnson 
Dr. Mary Lynch Johnson 
Dr. Meredith Johnson 
Mrs. Norman C. Johnson 
Mrs. Paul Johnson, Jr. 
Paula Sue Johnson 
Mrs. Robin H. Johnson 
Ruth Ellen Johnson 
Mrs. T. E. Johnson, Jr. 
Mrs. Wade Johnson 
Mrs. Walter J. Johnson, Jr. 
Mrs. Wiliam Lee Johnson 
Mrs. Wingate Johnson 




Mrs. A. M. Johnston 
Mrs. G. S. Johnston, Jr. 
Mrs. William T. Joines 
Annie H. Jones 
Barbara Jones 
Barbara Ann Jones 
Mrs. Charles M. Jones 
Cleo Jones 
Mrs. Hubert Jones 
Janet Faye Jones 
Mrs. Joseph Jones 



Mrs. J. W. Jones, Jr. 

Mrs. Lewis Jones 

Mrs. Max Frederick Jones 

Mrs. Michael H. Jones 

Mrs. M. T. Jones 

Nancy K. Jones 

Mrs. Paul H. Jones 

Mrs. Peter Jones 

Mrs. Ralph C. Jones 

Mrs. Robert C. Jones 

Ruth Jones 

Mrs. Sidney Jones 

Mrs. Troy E. Jones 

Mrs. V. C. Jones 

Mrs. William N. H. Jones 

Mrs. William Stanley Jones, Jr. 

Mrs, Cohen E. Jordan 

Mrs. Graydon Jordan 

Mrs. Leon Jordan 

Mrs. R. M. Jordan 

Mrs. R. C. Josey, Jr. 

Mrs. Donald A. Joyner 

Mrs. E. C. Joyner 

Mrs. George W. Joyner 

Nancy Joyner 

Hilda Judd 

Mrs. Frank K. Justice, Jr. 



Mrs. Oscar A. Kafer, III 
Mrs. James L. Kaler 
Mrs. Harry A. Kear 
Marjorie Keen 
Mrs. William L. Keiner 
Mrs. Frederick R. Keith 
Mrs. James Keisler 
Mrs. Linton J. Keith 
Mrs. L. J. Keith 
Mrs. Roy Keller 
Alice Jo Kelley 
Mrs. Fant Kelly 
Kathryn O'Neal Kelly 
Mrs. Paul Kelly 
Mrs. Herman Kendall 
Mrs. Henry Kendall , 

Mrs. P. W. Kendall 

Mrs. William .W. Kennedy 

Mrs. J. T. Kenyon 

Mrs. Thomas Kerr 

Mrs. J. M. Kesler 

Mrs. Joe B. Kesler 

Mrs. Vance R. Kesler 

Mrs. William E. Kibler 

Mildred Kichline 

Elizabeth F. Kidd 

Mrs. P. H. Kime 

Elizabeth Kimzey 

Jane Kincheloe 

Mrs. George E. King 

Mrs. James Kinion 

Mrs. Harry R. Kinlaw 

Mrs. S. J. Kirby 

Nancy Lee Kistler 

Mrs. Luke M. Kitahata 



12 



Mrs. Leiand Kitchin 
Mrs. W. W. Kitchin 
Mrs. A. A. Kittinger 
Peggy Klick 
Dr. lone K. Knight 
Mrs. Joe L. Knight 
Mrs. John E. Knight 
Mrs. K. C. Knight 
Margaret L. Knight 
Mrs. Ralph G. Knight 
Mrs. R. S. Knight, Jr. 
Mrs. Fred N. Knott 
Mrs. Joe R. Knott, Sr. 
Mrs. Joe T. Knott, Sr. 
Mrs. William A. Knott 
Mrs. Bonner Knox 
Evelyn Kocher 
Mrs. P. C. Kochhar 
Mrs. Robert H. Kohl 
Mrs. M. B. Koonce 
Mrs. David R. Koontz 
Mrs. Bernard J. Kopp 
Mrs. Henry J. Kratt 
Mrs. Charles R. Kiihn 
Mrs. Donald B. Kupper 

Mrs. W. H. Lain 
Carolyn Anne Laine 
Mrs: J. E. Lambeth, Jr. 
Eleanor Lamm 
Land of the Sky Chapter 
Mrs. A. V. Landera 
Dr. Bessie Evans Lane 
Mrs. J. Lester Lane 
Mrs. John D. Laney 
Mrs. W. C. Laney 
Mrs. L L. Langley 
Pollyanna Langston 
Mrs. V. L. Langston 
Mrs. Vernon Lankford 
Mrs. James B. Lasley 
Mrs. Charles W. Lassiter 
Mrs. Glenn Y. Lassiter 
Mrs. J. J. Lassiter, Jr. 









>V>-'-\ 



Mattie Lassiter 
Mrs. M. V. Lassiter 
Mrs. R. F. Lassiter 
Mrs. Rodney G. L.atham 
Mrs. W. J. Laughton, Jr. 
Mrs. Doan B. Laursen 
Mrs. Arthur C. Lawrence 
Mrs. Dan Lawrence 
Mrs. Jack Lawrence 
Mrs. James A. Lawrence 
Mrs. Tom Lawrence 
Mrs. James S. Lay, Jr. 
Patricia Lay 
Mrs. Frank Layman 
Mrs. Alfred K. Leach 
Mrs. J. C. Leary 
Mrs. J. M. Leatherwood 
Mrs. J. D. Leazar 
Mrs. A. C. Ledbetter 
Ida Belle Ledbetter 
Mrs. G. M. Ledford 
Mrs. G. S. Lee 
Mrs. Jo Lynn Lee 
Mrs. Lewis W. Lee 
Mrs. Luther M. Lee 
Mrs. Robert L Lee, Jr. 
Mrs. Ralph S. Leete 
Patricia Leggett 
Patricia Anne Leggett 
Mrs. George A. Leighton 
Mrs. J. Douglas Leitch 
Mrs. C. F. Leonard 
Mrs. Elizabeth T. Leonard 
Mrs. Joe G. Leonard 
Mrs. William I-. Leonard 
Mrs. George H. Lewis, Jr. 
Mrs. Jack Levine 
Mrs. Jack Fleet Lewis 
Jane T. Lewis 
Mrs. J. G. Lewis 
Mrs. Kenneth B. Lewis 
Mrs. McDaniel Lewis 
Mrs. Roy Lewis 
Mrs. Stanley J. Lewis 
Mrs. W. E. Lewis 
Mrs. W. Henry Lewis 
Mrs. William L. Lewis 
Mrs. Marc Lifschey 
Jean Lightfoot 
Mrs. Bruce Liles 
Meredith Liles 
Mrs. H. M. Lilly 
Mrs, Earl I., l.indanger 
Mrs. D. W. Lindsey, Sr. 
Mrs. Harold E. Lindsey 
Foy I.ineberry 
Ruth Lineberry 
Mrs. Robert T. Liner. Jr. 
Mrs. Nellie C. Linney 
Mrs. Charles Linville 
Mrs. Thomas S. Lipscomb 
Mrs. Tyler Lisk 
Mrs. Harry Litchfield 
Mrs. C. C. Little 



Mrs. J. S. Livermon 

Mary M. Livingston 

Diana Lloyd 

Mrs. Fred C. Lloyd 

Mrs. Joel Locke 

Mrs. L. W. Locke 

Mrs. A. A. Loftin 

Mrs. Harold Lominac 

Betsy Rose Long 

Mrs. Donald S. Long 

Mrs. Douglas S. Long 

Mrs. E. A. Long 

Mrs. Locke C. Long 

Melba Long 

Mrs. Nathan Long 

Mrs. R. M. Long 

Mrs. W. Earl Long 

Mrs. Daniel W. Lovelace 

Mrs. William M. Lovelace 

Elizabeth Lovill 

Mrs. Cecil Lowe 

Mrs. Swindell L. Lowery 

Mrs. William R. Loyd 

Mrs. A. M. Lucas 

Mrs. Leon T. Lucas 

Mrs. William C. Lucas, Jr. 

Mrs. E. B. Luke 

Mrs. Mark G. Lynch 

Mrs. Ruth A. Lyon 



Mrs. Hugh M. McArn, Jr. 

Mrs. Carlton McCall 

Mrs. Horace McCall 

Mrs. Martel B. McCallum 

Mrs. Lloyd C. McCaskill 

Mrs. Richard H. McCaskill 

Mrs. Howard G. McClain 

Mrs. George A. McClenny 

Mrs. C. L. McCombs 

Mrs. Gene R. McCreary 

Mary E. McCullers 

Mrs. A. Wilton McDaniel 

Mrs. G. C, McDaniel 

Mrs. T. J. McDaniel 

Jcannettc McDonald 

Mrs. Allison McDowell 

Mrs. N. O. McDowell 

Mrs. E. H. McFarland 

Lillian McFarland 

Velma McGee 

Mrs. William K. McGce 

Mrs. A. Ci. McGill 

Mrs. Norman F. McGill. Jr. 

Mrs. N. Vannoy McGlamery, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert E. McGlaughon 

Joan McGranahan 

Mrs. W. S. McGranahan, Jr. 

Mrs. Douglas L. McCiuirc 

Mrs. Charles Mclntyre 

Mrs. John A. Mclntyre 

Mrs. Stewart G. McKay 

Mrs. Jack McKcc 

Mrs. G. M. McKelvcy 



13 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Mary Lyon McKenney 

Mrs. James M. McKenzie 

Mrs. William Joseph McKenzie, Jr 

Mrs. William Louis McKinnon 

Judy McLamb 

LaRue McLamb 

Mrs. Daniel V. McLaughlin 

Mrs. Paschall McLaurin 

Mrs. C. W. McManus 

Mrs. C. W. McManus, Jr. 

Mary J. McManus 

Mrs. Sam McManus 

Mrs. H. H. McMillan 

Mrs. Jarvis McMillan 

Joyce O. McMillan 

Louise McMillan 

Mrs. William Harvey McMurray 

Mrs. W. E. McNair 

Frances McNairy 

Mrs. Ethel F, McNeal 

Mrs. Elbert McPhaul, Jr. 

Emma McPherson 

Mrs. Horace R. McSwain 

Mrs. Robert W. McWilliams 

Mrs. Franklin Mabry 

Jeannette Mace 

Elizabeth Machen 

Mrs. George H. Machen 

Joyce Ellen MacKintosh 

Mrs. Louise J. MacMillan 

Mrs. C. Gordon Maddrey 

Mrs. Lynn O. Maddrey 

Mrs. Eupha M. Madry 

Mrs. J. Thurman Madry 

Mrs. William A. Mahler 

Mrs. Raymond B. Mallard 

Mrs. Donald Malpass 

Mrs. Blanche C. Mann 

Mrs. Truxton K. Mann, Jr. 

Mrs. Joseph R. Marks 

Patty Marks 

Mrs. William H. Marley 

Mrs. Barton H. Marshall 

Flossie Marshbanks 

Mrs. K. J. Martin 

Margaret Martin 

Mrs. Sidney Martin 

Mrs. Walter H. Martin 

Mrs. Wheeler Martin 

Mrs. William D. Martin, Jr. 

Mrs. Harry L. Mashburn 

Jean P. Mason 

Mrs. J. W. Mason 

Mrs. Manly Mason 

Mrs. J. S. Massenburg 

Mrs. Louise M. Massey 

Mrs. P. H. Massey 

Mrs. Dave P. Mast 

Mrs. C. D. Matheny 

Lou Mathis 

Bessie Matthews 

Mrs. D. O. Matthews 

Mrs. George Powers Matthews 

Kate Matthews 



Rebecca Grace Matthews 

Mrs. R. W. Matthews 

Mrs. W. H. Matthews 

Mrs. Herman Mattocks 

Mrs. Ronald M. Mauney 

Mrs. Abe F. Maxwell 

Mrs. Albert H. Maxwell 

Mrs. John P. Mayer 

Mrs. Bryan Maynard 

Edith Maynard 

Lillian Maynard 

Mrs. Walter H. Maynard, Jr. 

Louise Mays 

Mamie Meeks 

Mrs. R. H. Melvin 

Mrs. Duncan T. Memory 

Fay Memory 

Carolyn Mercer 

Mrs. Cecil P. Merritt 

Dorothy Merritt 

Mrs. Gordon K. Middleton 

Mrs. J. Leonard Middleton 

Mrs. Walter L. Midgette 

Mrs. Charles W. Midkiff: 

Mrs. J. P. Milam 

Mrs. M. C. Miles 

Mrs. Allen C. Millar 

Louise Milford 

Elizabeth Y. Miller 

Mrs. J. Everette Miller 

Mrs. Kimball Miller, Jr. 

Mrs. Murray A. Miller 

Mrs. Ralph E. Miller 

Mrs. Robert L. Miller 

Mrs. T. G. Miller, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter A. Miller 

Mrs. W. J. Miller 

Mrs. Thomas B. Milligan 

Mrs. Paul Millinder 

Mrs. John Mills 

Mrs. Ada Mims 

Mrs. Whit S. Mincey 

Mrs. Lawrence A. Mink 

AUeine R. Minor 

Mrs. Frank Minter, Jr. 

Mrs. Harry L. Mintz, Jr. 

Mrs. C. W. Mitchell 

Mrs. David L. Mitchell 

Mrs. T. W. Mitchell 

Mrs. Wiley Mitchell 

Mrs. W. A. Mitchiner 

Mrs. W. H. Mitchiner 

Mrs. James N. Mobley 

Mrs. J. H. Mobley 

Mrs. A. J. Moncrief 

Mrs. Wade Moncrief, Jr. 

Irene Money 

Mrs. H. Fairley Monroe 

Mrs. Carol E. Montague 

Mrs. D. R. Moody 

Mrs. A. O. Moore 

Mrs. David P. Moore 

Mrs. Frank C. Moore 

Mrs. Gerald N. Moore 



Mrs. Glenn B. Moore 
Mrs. Harold M. Moore 
Mrs. J. H. Moore 
Mrs. Kenneth L. Moore 
Mary Moore 
Mildred Moore 
Mrs. Nathaniel H. Moore, Jr. 
Mrs. N. Henry Moore 
Mrs, Radford M. Moore 
Mrs. Thomas Moore 
Mrs. T. K. Moore 
Mrs. W. A. Moore 
Mrs. Wade Moore 
Mrs. W. M. Moore 
Mrs. Donald S. Moose 
Mrs. Otis H. Moran 
Mrs. Bernice L Morgan 
Mrs. G. W. Morgan, Jr. 
Martha Virginia Morgan 
Mary Lou Morgan 
Mrs. Platte B. Moring 
Mrs Dan L. Morrill 
Mrs. Margaret C. Morris 
Mrs. Roy W. Morris 
Mrs. S. R. Morris, Jr. 
Mrs. Lucian T. Morrisette 
Mrs. Franklin Morrison 
Mrs. John C. Morrison 
Sara Elizabeth Morrow 
Mrs. Victor E. Morrow 
Blondie Morse 
Mrs. G. H. Moseley 
Mrs. G. W. Moss 
Mrs. James T. Moss 
Mrs. Russell S. Moss 
Mrs. R. V. Moss 
Mrs. Myra S. Motley 
Mrs. L. K. Mowery 
Mrs. Abram J. Moye 
Mrs. Ethel E. Moyers 
Mrs. Wilbur E. Mozingo, Jr. 
Mrs. Milton E. Muder 
Mrs. S. F. Mullen 
Mrs. C. G. Mumford 
Howard C. Mumford 
Mrs. Irwin L. Munford 
Mrs. Raymond E. Murphrey 
Mrs. Arthur Murphy 
Mrs. Helen P. Murray 
Katie Murray 

Mrs. Douglas Musselwhite 
Mrs. R. L. Mustian 
Mrs. Frank Muth 



Mrs. Lucile Nanney 
Elizabeth Nash 
Minnie Nash 
Sarah Elizabeth Nash 
Mrs. Robert E. Naylor, Jr. 
Mrs. C. Leon Neal 
Mrs. Jordan Neal 
Mrs. Robert H. Neel 



14 



Mrs. David Hall Nelson 
Mrs. Charles R. Newsom 
Mrs. H. C. Newbold 
Mrs. Minetta B. Newbold 
Jennie Raid Newby 
Mrs. Charles B. Newcomb 
Mrs. James P. Newman 
Mrs. Leslie Newman 
Mrs. Mattie Lee Newman 
Mrs. Charles R. Newsom 
Linda Newton 



Mrs. Thomas L. Ogburn 
Idalia Oglesby 
Virginia Ogletree 
Mrs. Dewey O'Kelley 
Mrs. Ed Okrasinski 
Mrs. E. E. Olive 
Mrs. Eugene Olive 
Mrs. James Olive 
Mrs. L. B. Olive 
Lowney Olive 
Myra Olive 



Mrs. Clarence D. Parker 
Flora Ethel Parker 
Mrs. Harry O. Parker 
Mrs. John C. Parker 
Mrs. Louis O. Parker 
Mrs. Ogden Parker 
Mrs. Roland P. Parker 
Mrs. T. W. Parker 
Mrs. Walton Parker 
Mrs. W. W. Parker 
Mrs. G. T. Parkin 




virs. Paul C. Newton 
Virs. Lawrence Nichols 
Vlrs. Sarah R. Nicholson 
^ucile Nix 

virs. George Noel, Jr. 
sirs. Robert F. Noel 
\nn Nooe 
iarah M. Nooe 
vlrs. Vincent W. Norako 
vlrs. Hontas Norfleet 
vlartha Jean Norman 
vlrs. John A. Norris 
iureiha Knott Norris 
t'vonne Norris 
vlrs. Lamar Northup 
Tarolyn E. Norwood 
vlrs. Charles H. Norwood 
vlrs. Charles S. Norwood 
vlrs. E. S. Norwood 
vlrs. J. D. Norwood 
vlrs. Robert Norwood 
vlrs. Maurice Nottingham 
/ivian Nowell 



vlrs. C. E. Oakley 
vlrs. Curtis H. Oakley 
vlrs. Janie B. Oakley 
vlrs. John C. Oatfield 
vlrs. J. T. Odom 
4rs. C. L. Odum 
«lrs. Leon Ogburn 



Mrs. Percy Olive 
Mrs. T. H. Olive 
Mrs. W. Walter Olive 
Mildred P. Oliver 
Mrs. Rudolph E. Oliver 
Mrs. T. D. O'Quinn 
Martha Ann Osborne 
Mrs. Jesse B. Overby 
Mrs. Joseph R. Overby 
Mrs. L. H. Overby 
Mrs. L. S. Overstreet 
Mrs. Wayne Overton 
.Alma Hunter Owen 
Mrs. L. J. Owen 
Mrs. Albert E. Owens 
Mrs. Otto Owens 
Mrs. Ronald L. Owens 



Mrs. Frank S, Pace, Jr. 
Mrs. Fuller Pace 
Mrs. F. H. Page 
Mrs. Hubert L. Page 
Mrs. W. J. Page 
Mrs. Edward H. Pahl 
Mrs. George R. Painter 
Mrs. Billv Joe Palmer 
Mrs. H. il. Palmer 
Mrs. Benjamin Parham 
Mrs. Francis T. Parham 
Mrs. Roy H. Park 
Mrs. Chester A. Parker 



Mrs. William R. Parks 
Mrs. Truman Parmele 
Judith L. Paschal 
Mary Ellen Pate 
Mrs. Clarence H. Patrick 
Lena Rose Patterson 
Mrs. H. Shelton Patterson 
Mrs. John H. Patterson 
Mrs. K. H. Patterson 
Mrs. Ralph M. Patterson 
Mrs. Ronald .\. Patterson 
Mildred .Ann Patton 
Mrs. Donald R, Paul 
Mrs. Catherine S. Peacock 
Mrs. Mary O. Peacock 
Mrs. Dwight F. Pearec 
Mrs. John W. Pcarce 
Judith Fa\e Pcarce 
Marjorie Pcarce 
Millicent Pcarce 
Mrs. William R. Pcarce 
Mrs. Chilton Pearson 
Mrs. Sue Wilson Pealross 
Mrs. E. .Stanley Peck 
Mrs. H. G. Peck 
Mrs. Francis W. Peek- 
Mrs. Leon Pccle 
Mrs. Dwight Pcndergraft 
Peninsula Chapter 
Mrs. C . V. Penney 
A. Ruth Penny 
Mrs. Elder F. Penny 



15 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Mrs. Thomas H. Perdue 

Mrs. L. P. Perkins 

Mrs. Robin H. Perkins 

Mrs. Richard T. Perkinson 

Mrs. J. OUn Perritt 

Mrs. Annie L. Perry 

Mrs. Clifford W. Perry 

Mrs. Dow V. Perry 

Mrs. Emmett M. Perry 

Mrs. E. P. Perry 

Mrs. Gloria T. Perry 

Mrs. Joel V. Perry 

Mrs. Mack D. Perry, Jr. 

Mildred Perry 

Mrs. Robert A. Peters 

Mrs. B. A. Peterson 

Julia Peterson 

Mrs. Linwood Peterson 

Mrs. Martin R. Peterson, Jr. 

Mrs. S. Bruce Petteway 

Mrs. Robert H. Petty 

Mrs. Carl Pfeiffer 

Mrs. Lillian R. Pfeiffer 

Mrs. Claude J. Phelps 

Mrs. Claude D. Phillips 

Mrs. C. L. Phillips 

Mrs. Guy Phillips 

Mrs. J. J. Phillips 

Mrs. Margaret B. Phillips 

Mrs. R. A. Phillips 

Mrs. R. D. Phillips 

Mrs. Roy E. Phillips 

Mrs. W. W. Phillips 

Mrs. James W. Pickard 

Mrs. Worth Pickard 

Dr. Ella J. Pierce 

Clara M. Pigg 

Mrs. Roy E. Piner 

Mrs. Raymond A. Pinkham 

Mrs. Charles H. Pinner 

Mrs. Roger R. Pitman 

Mrs. F. H. Pittman 

Florence Pittman 

Mrs. J. L. Pittman 

Mrs. Kenneth W. Pittman 

Mrs. Richard Pittman 

Mrs. R. L. Pittman 

Mrs. Robert E. Pittman 

Mrs. W. E. Poe 

Mrs. J. Joseph Pointer 

Jean E. Pollock 

Mrs. Robert A. Ponton 

Mrs. Frank Pool 

Mrs. Gordon Poole 

Mrs. C. H. Pope 

Mrs. R. Hunter Pope 

Mrs. Arthur W. Porter 

Mrs. R. R. Porter 

Susie M. Porter 
Mrs. W. S. Porter 
Mrs. W. S. Porter, Jr. 
Clarissa Poteat 
Mrs. James M. Potter 




Mrs. James M. Potter, Jr. 

Mrs. Adalia W. Powell 

Mrs. Ben W. Powell 

Mrs. Benjamin W. Powell, Jr. 

Mrs. Frank Powell 

Mrs. Hugh R. Powell 

Mrs. J. C. Powell 

Mrs. Jonathan S. Powell 

Mary Hester Powell 

Mrs. S. E. Powell 

Mrs. W. A. Powell 

Mrs. W. G. Powell 

Mrs. William S. Powell 

Mrs. M. A. Powers 

Mrs. Gerald V. Presson 

Mrs. Edwin S. Preston, Jr. 

Mrs. E. W. Price, Jr. 

Mrs. Harry P. Price 

Mrs. Julian Price 

Mrs. Edward K. Priest 

Mrs. Gerald Primm 

Mrs. Jimmy H. Prince 

Mrs. Harold B. Pritchard 

Mrs. T. W. Pritchard 

Mrs. T. W. Pritchard, Jr. 

Barre Pritchett 

Mrs. Earl Propst 

Mrs. George B. Pruden 

Mrs. Alfred E. Pruitt 

Mrs. Bland Pruitt 

Mrs. W. H. Pryor 

Janet B. Puckett 

Mabel Puckett 

Mrs. William Skinner Pugh 

Mrs. Frank Purgat 



Mrs. Lynn Quackenbush 
Mrs. Calvin L. Quarles 



Mrs. A. C. Rabb 
Margaret Rackley 
Barbara Jane Radford 
Stella K. Raines 
Mrs. Thomas R. Rainey 
Mrs. Jake Ramsaur 
Mrs. Henry Ramseur 



Mrs. Herbert W. Ramsey 
Mrs. Elizabeth P. Rand 
Jacqueline Eagles Rand 
Mrs. Walter Rand 
Mrs. William R. Rand 
Mrs. W. K. Rand 
Mrs. E. A. Randolph 
Mrs. E. L. Rankin, Jr. 
Mrs. Luther E. Raper 
Mrs. Paul J. Rappaport 
Mrs. Jack M. Rascoe 
Katherine A. Ratley 
Mrs. Zeno O. Ratliff, Jr. 
Mrs. John C. Rawlins 
Mrs. S. W. Rawls 
Mrs. Burton J. Ray 
Mrs. M. E. Ray 
Carol Reams 
Mrs. Howard M. Reaves 
Mrs. Eugene F. Redden 
Mrs. R. M. Redden 
Mrs. Ben G. Reeves 
Mrs. James C. Reeves 
Mozelle L. Reeves 
Mrs. John Regan 
Mrs. John W. Register 
Mrs. Robert C. Reid 
Mrs. Robert O. Reid 
Mrs. Carl F. Renfro 
Mrs. A. W. Renfrow 
Nancy E. Renfrow 
Mrs. Richard E. Rettew 
Mrs. Mary F. Reveley 
Mrs. Millard Rewis 
Mrs. Eleanor H. Reynolds 
Mrs. Ernest Reynolds 
Lulie Reynolds 
Mrs. Richard V. Rhodes 
Mrs. Reginald M. Rhue 
Mrs. Paul C. Rhyne, Jr. 
Mrs. A. J. Richards 

Mrs. E. R. Richardson 

Mrs. Joe Richardson 

Mrs. Robert L. Richardson 

Mrs. Thomas M. Richmond, J 

Mrs. A. C. Richter 

Mrs. Raymond E. Ricks 

Mrs. Durham G. Riddle 

Anna Riddick 

Mrs. J. G. Riddick 

Mrs. Baxter Ridenhour 

Mrs. B. M. Riggins 

Mrs. Helen D. Riley 

Mrs. Harold Ritter 

Ann Rivers 

Martha Rivers 

Mrs. W. Linville Roach 

Mrs. Bob Roberson 

Clarene F. Roberson 

Mrs. George B. Roberts 

Karen Ann Roberts 

Mrs. J. R. Robertson 

Mrs. Leon W. Robertson 



16 



Mrs. Raymond Robertson 
Mrs. W. L. Robertson 
Mrs. Jack Robinson 
Mrs. J. I. Robinson 
Mrs. Orville A. Robinson 
Mrs. Richard E. Robinson 
Mrs. George D. Robison 
Mrs. Nisbet P. Rodgers 
Mrs. Willis P. Rodgers 
Mrs. Clyde E. Rodwell 
Dr. Eleanor Rodwell 
Aileen Rogers 



Mrs. Andrew N. Roupas 
Mrs. H. F. Rouse 
Anne Rowe 
Mrs. O. R. Rowe, Jr. 
Mrs. W. B. Rowell 
Ethel M. Rowland 
Mrs. H. B. Rowland 
Mrs. A. Lee Royal 
Mrs. J. Sebron Royal 
Mrs. Henry O. Ruark 
Mrs. J. A. Rudisill 
Mrs. Douglas Ruff 




Mrs. A. Paul Rogers, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles N. Rogers 
Mrs. Daisy H. Rogers 
Fllcn L. Rogers 
Mrs. William J. Rogers 
Mrs. Paul R. Rohlfing 
Phyllis i:. Rollins 
Mrs. F. H. Rose 
Harriet Rose 
Mrs. I. W. Rose 
Mrs. James M. Rose 
Dr. Norma Rose 
Mrs. Rabon A. Rose 
Mrs. R. Ncill Ross 



Mrs. J. T. Ruffing 
Mrs. Robert F. RulTncr 
Mrs. Claude Ruilcr 
Mrs. William D. Rusher 
Mrs. Lindscy Russell 
Mrs. Claude (i. Rullcdgc 
Mrs. Claude Rutledge. Jr. 
Mrs. George F. Rutzler 



Mrs. Arnold E. Saaf 
Mrs. Richard Saintsing 
Mrs. Lionel Salter 
Mrs. Edward Samsa 



Mrs. James D. Samuels 
Mrs. Robert Sandercock 
Mrs. E. C. Sanders, Jr. 
Mabel Sanders 
Mrs. George Sandlin 
Mrs. Fred Sandusky 
Mrs. Virginia P. Sanner 
Mrs. Woodrow Sarvis 
Mrs. Ira E. Satterfield 
Mrs. James M. Satterfiield 
Mrs. Clyde Satterwhite 
Mrs. Mac Satterwhite 
Mrs. W. M. Satterwhite 
Mrs. W. M. Satterwhite, Jr. 
Mrs. Daniel Satisky 
Mrs. John W. Saunders 
Mrs. Robert G. Savage 
Mrs. Rex Savery 
Mrs. H. G. Sawyer 
Mrs. J. H. Sawyer 
Mrs. L. H. Sawyer 
Mrs. L. D. Saylor 
Mrs. M. L. Scaggs 
Mrs. Robert A. Scaggs 
Mrs. Haywood Scarborough 
Iris Scarborough 
Mrs. J. H. Scarborough 
Mrs. Rae Scarborough 
Mrs. Roy O. Scholz 
Mrs. Forrest F. Schrum, Jr. 
Mrs. Carey E. .Scott 
Mrs. Charles I,. Scott 
Mrs. Council M. Scott 
Mrs. J. C. Scott 
Mrs. John G. Scott 
Mrs. .Arthur F. Seabeneck 
Mrs. James M. Sears 
Mrs. Alma D. Seawcll 
Mary Robert Seawcll 
Mrs. Luther W. Self 
Mrs. Carson E. Sellers 
Mrs. Neil L. Scntcr 
Penelope ,'\nn .Senlcr 
Mrs. Steven R. Serletis 
Mrs. G. W. Sermons 
Sandra Lee Sessoms 
Mrs. Frederick Severance 
Mrs. R. W. Severance 
Mrs. David F. Sewcll 
Mrs. John R. Sexton, Jr. 
Mrs. Louis Seyer 
Mrs. A. T. Seymour. Sr. 
Mrs. W. T. Shaddick 
Mrs. M. A. Shaver 
Mrs. A. E. Shaw 
Mrs. Ben L. Shaw 
Mrs. K. J. Shaw 
Mrs. Reuben A. Shaw 
Mrs. Robert A. Shaw 
Mrs. J. D. She.irin 
Mrs. R. F. Shcarin 
Mrs. Stanley F. Shcarin 
Mrs. Raymond M. Shcely 



17 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Mrs. Charles M. Sheets 

Ruth L. Sheets 

Mrs. J. C. Shell 

Mrs. S. G. Shepard 

Mrs. William A. Shepherd 

Elizabeth H. Shermer 

Mrs. Isabel D, Sherrill 

Louise Sherron 

Mrs. Edward Shervette, Jr. 

Gera-Lu Shervette 

Mrs. S. H. Shoaf 

Mrs. Jack Shogren 

Mrs. Richard R. Shoop 

Mrs. James R. Short 

Mrs. T. D. Shuler 

Mrs. Dan Sibley 

Mrs. Harriett H. Sides 

Mrs. Algernon F. Sigmon, Jr. 

Mrs. Monroe H. Silver 

Mrs. B. W. Simons 

Donnie Simons 

Mrs. Paul Simmons 

Mrs. Albert E. Simms 

Helen Simms 

Mrs. Robert N. Simms 

Mrs. Stewart B. Simms 

Mrs. Edward J. Simpson 

Jean Simpson 

Mrs. William H. Simpson 

Mrs. June Singletary, Jr. 

Mrs. Archie Sink 

Mrs. Kester A. Sink 

Mrs. Charles Skidmore 

Mrs. Frank Skinner 

Mrs. Bill E. Slaton 

Mrs, Elsie B. Sledd 

Mrs. F. G. Sloop 

Mrs. Morris Slotnick 

Euzelia Smart 

Mrs. Billy Smith 

Brenda Smith 

Mrs. Bryan Smith 

Mrs. Bud Smith 

Mrs. Carroll W. Smith 

Mrs. C. B. Smith 

Mrs. Charles R. Smith 

Mrs. Charles Vernon Smith 

Mrs. Charles W. S. Smith 

Mrs. C. K. Smith 

Mrs. Clyde L. Smith 

Mrs. C. S. Smith 

Mrs. David A. Smith 

Mrs. Douglas Smith 

Mrs. Farmer Smith 

Mrs. J. Ed Smith 

Mrs. John S. Smith 

Joyce Ann Smith 

Mrs. L. C. Smith 

Mrs. Mark L. Smith 

Mrs. Preston Smith 

Mrs. Truman S. Smith 

Mrs. William C. Smith, Jr. 

Mrs. William M. Smith 



Mrs. William S. Smith, Jr. 
Mrs. W. Scott Smith 
Mrs. W. W. Smith 
Mrs. David Smoot 
Mrs. T. Barton Smoot 
Mrs. Kenneth W. Snelling 
Mrs. A. H. Snider 
Mrs. C. L. Snipes 
Mrs. Russell G. Snipes 
Mrs. W. R. Snotherly 
Mrs. H. Linwood Snowa 
Betty Ann Snyder 
Mrs. Charity R. Snyder 
Mrs. E. C. Snyder 
Betty Sodeman 
Mrs. E. F. Solliday 
Mrs. Gertrude R. Sorrell 
Mrs. R. J. Southerland 
Mrs. S. E. Southerland 
Mrs. Jason L. Sox, Jr. 
Mrs. Herman F. Spain 
Mrs. William H. Sparrow 
Mrs. C. V. Spear, Jr. 
Mrs. R. F. Speight 
Mrs. T. S. Speight 
Mrs. Julian C. Spence 
Martha Gray Spence 
Mrs. William N. Spence 
Mrs. W. O. Spence 
Mrs. Darrell Spencer 
Mrs. J. Graham Spencer 
Nancv Jane Spencer 
Mrs. Holly W. Sphar 
Mrs. Fred Spivey 
Mrs. J. M. Spoon 
Mrs. Re.x B. Springton 
Mrs. Everett Spurling, Jr. 
Mrs. G. Douglas Squillario 
Mrs. R. M. Squires 
Ruamie Squires 
Mrs. Lee P. Stack 
Mrs. F. B. Stackhouse 
Mrs. C. B. Stafford 



Joyce Ellen Stainback 

Christine Stallings 

Mrs. B. A. Stamey 

Mrs. H. M. Stamey 

Mrs. E. M. Stallings 

Mrs. Reginald H. Starr, Jr. 

Mrs. Annie H. St. Clair 

Mrs. Harold Steadman 

Mrs. Robert H. Steele 

Mrs. B. B. Stephens 

Mrs. L J. Stephens 

Mrs. J. T. Stephens 

Mrs. Mallie B. Stephens 

Mrs. T. N. Stephens 

Mrs. C. E. Stephenson 

Mrs. C. S. Stephenson 

Mrs. Earl Stephenson 

Mrs. Robert J. Stephenson 

Mrs. Robert L. Stephenson, Jr. 

Mrs. W. C. Stephenson 

Mrs. W. C. Stephenson, Jr. 

Mrs. Eric W. Stevens 

Barbara Stewart 

Mrs. C. W. Stickney 

Mrs. J. T. Still, Jr. 

Elizabeth Stillwell 

Mrs. John S. Stith 

Mrs. Alton Stone 

Mrs. M. A. Stone 

Mrs. Richard D. Stover 

Mrs. Troy L. Strange 

Mrs. Thomas P. Stratford 

Mrs. Herman Strayhorn 

Hilda Ann Strayhorn 

Mrs. B. A. Strickland 

Margaret Strickland 

Mrs. Teddy R. Strickland 

Mrs. L. P. Strider 

Mrs. P. W. Strider 

Bertha Mae Stroud 

Beulah Stroud 

Mrs. Albert Stuart 

Mrs. C. J. Stuart 




18 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Juan 
Mrs 
Mrs, 



L. C. .Stubblefield 
J. E. Sturdivant 
Charles S. Styron 
Reginald Styron 
Charles W. Suggs 
Charles S. Sullivan 
Coleman N. Sullivan 
Gayle P. Sullivan 
Robert A. Sullivan 
E. W. Summersill 
R. L. Summerlin 
Wade Surratt. Jr. 
A. J. Sutter 
David B. Sutton 
J. L. Sutton 
Richard D. Sutton 
R. Ncal Sutton 
Sarah C. Swain 
Boyst B. Swann 
Clyde H. Swann 
Austin Swallow 
Erick N. Swenson 
Frederick J. Swift 
i<a Swindler 
A. L. Swisher 
Eloise Sykes 



Mrs. Christopher A. Tabor 

Mrs. Douglas TafRnder 

Mrs. Robert I.. Tallcy 

Grace Talton 

Jean Arthur Tate 

Mrs. E. C. Tatum 

Mrs. R. W. Tayloe 

Mrs. Burton H. Taylor 

Mrs. ( ooper E. Taylor 

Mrs. H. A. Taylor 

Mrs. H. J. Taylor 

Jennie Lou Taylor 

Mary Taylor 

Mrs. Robert L. Taylor 

Mrs. Samuel V. Taylor 

Mrs. Thomas Leonard Taylor 

Mrs. R. E. League 

Mrs. Jennings B. Teal 

Mrs. Charles R. Tedder 

Mrs. Alton Temple 

Mrs. Douglas Temple 

Mrs. Douglas Temple, Jr. 

Mrs. W. G. Temple 

Elizabeth Ann G. Tench 

M'-s. W. Lee Terrill 

Mrs. Cleveland Thayer 

Mrs. Alvin A. Thomas 

Mrs. Bennett .\. Thomas 

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Thomas 

Mrs. F. J. Thomas 

Mrs. H. Lee 1 homas 

Linda Frances Thomas 

Louise I homas 

iMrs. Marguerite F. Thomas 

Margy Thomas 



Mary Emma Thomas 

Mildred F. Thomas 

Mrs. Nelson Thomas 

Mrs. S. L. Thomas, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter C. Thomas. Jr. 

Mrs. B. C. Thomasson 

Mrs. Walter J. Thomasson, Jr. 

Mrs. Bill Thompson 

Ella Graves Thompson 

Mrs. E. N. Thompson 

Mrs. George Thompson, III 

Mrs. Jean M. Thompson 

Mrs. Margery K. Thompson 

Mrs. Zack Thompson 

Mrs. Conway Thornburgh 

Linda Gail Thornton 

Mrs. Roy D. Thornton 

Mrs. John Mercer Thorp 

Mary Thorp 

Mrs. John M. Thorpe 

Mrs. Paul Tigar 

Doris Tillery 




Mary H. Tillery 

Mrs. Bert Q. Tillcy 

Mrs. Charles M. Timberlake 

Mrs. J. P. Timberlake, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter L. Tippetl 

Mrs. Leslie K. Todd 

Mrs. James C. Tollcson 

Mrs. A. S. Tomlinson 

Margaret Tomlinson 

Mrs. William E. Tomlinson 

Mrs. F. Ferebee Trafton 

Mrs. J. Benjamin Travis 

Mrs. W. G. Tre.xler, Jr. 

Nancy H. Tribble 

Dr. Phyllis Tribble 

Mrs. Robert E. Tripp, Jr, 

Mrs. James O. Trogdon 

Mrs. Ray Trott 

Mrs. Kennard S. Trowbridge 

Mrs. Olin C. Trull 

Mrs. Frank O. Truslow 

Mrs. H. C. Tucker 

Mrs. F. Donna Taylor Tucker 

Mrs. Leon W. Tucker 



Mrs. Royster M. Tucker 
Bruce TuU 
Mrs. Edward R. Tull 
Mrs. Verne W. Tunstall 
Mrs. J. E. Turlington 
Mrs. Roscoe Turlington 
Mrs. Eugene H. Turner 
Mrs. Lambert E. Turner 
Mrs. Lewis Turner 
Mrs. Sam W. Turner 
Mrs. T. A. Turner 
Mrs. Spencer Turrentine 
Peggy Tutor 
Mrs. Marion Tyler 
Mrs. N. B. Tyler 
Mrs. J. R. Tyndall 
Mary Louise Tyndall 
Mrs. B. Y. Tyner 
Mrs. Herschel Tyson 

Mrs. O. E. Underwood 
Mrs. Avery C. Upchurch 
Mrs. Charles H. Upchurch 
Mrs. William Upchurch 
Mrs. George W. Urwick, Jr. 
Mrs. Ben R. Ussery 
Mrs. Calvin H. Ussery 



Mrs. Zeb Vance 

Dr. Ruth M. Vande Kieft 

Mrs. David Van Hook 

Dorothy Vann 

Dr. Elizabeth Vann 

Mrs. William S. Vann 

Mrs. Herbert N. Van Nostrand 

Mrs. David B. Van Sant 

Mrs. W. C. Van Sant 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Vaughan 

Mrs. M. H. Veach 

Mrs. J. H. Vernon, Jr, 

Mrs. J. S. Vernon 

Mrs. Odcll S. Vestal, Jr. 

Mrs. J. S. Vetler 

Mrs. Robert S. Viall 

Nancy B. Viccellio 

Mrs. R. E. Vick 

Mrs. Frank B. Vincent 

Mrs. Edward T. Viser 

Mrs. T. C. Wagstaflf 
Mrs. E. P. Walker 
Mrs. Irving H. Wainwrighl 
Mrse. George W. Walker, Jr. 
Mrs. James B. Walker 
Mrs. John W. Walker. Jr. 
Mrs. Robert L. Walker 
Mrs. T. E. Walker 
Mrs. Harold B. Wall 
Mrs. Marvin W. Wall 
Mrs, Percy 1 . Wall 
Mrs. Richard T. Wall 
Nancy Wallace 



19 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Sandra Jean Wallace 
Mrs. Warren C. Wallace 
Lois Waller 

Mrs. Robert A. Walling, Jr. 
Patricia M. Walston 
Suellen Walter 
Frances Ruth Walters 
Mrs. Lacy W. Walters 
Mrs. Frank P. Ward 
Mrs. Henry D. Ward 
Mrs. Robert E. Ward, Jr. 
Mrs. Jack Wardlaw 
Mrs. James Warlick 
Mrs. Charles J. Warner 
Mrs. Donald G. Warren 
Mrs. D. R. Warren 
Mrs. James O. Warren 
Mrs. Richard G. Warren 
Mrs. R. S. Warren 
Mrs. Michael W. Wasell 
Mrs. Bryant Waters 
Marguerite Ann Waters 
Mrs. W. D. Waters 
Mrs. C. M. Watkins 
Louise T. Watkins 
Mrs. William A. Watkins 
Mrs. Frank C. Watson 
Mrs. Gene Watson 
Mrs. George C. Wa'son 
Mrs. George D. Watson 
Mrs. James E. Watson, Jr. 
Mrs. Larry W. Watson 
Mrs. Norman T. Watson 
Rebecca Jane Watson 
Mrs. J. B. Watts 
Mrs. John Watts 
Mrs. John E. Watts 
Mrs. W. Glenn Watts 
Mrs. William M. Watts 
Mrs. Spencer Waynick 
Mrs. John E. Wear 
Mrs. Robert I. Weatherford 
Mrs. B. R. Weathers 
Mrs. H. M. Weathers 
Mrs. L. F. Weathers 
Mrs. Charles D. Webb 
Mrs. H. T. Webb, Jr. 
Mrs. William D. Webb 
Mrs. Hubert F. Wehlitz 
Mrs. John D. Welch 
Mrs. N. W. Weldon 
Mrs. Robert C. Wells 
Mrs. W. S. Wells. Jr. 
Mrs. Austin West 
Mabel West 
Mrs. R. E. West 
Verona West 
Mrs. W. Wayne West 
Mrs. C. S, Wester 
Mrs. John Wethered 
Mrs. John L. Whaley 
Mrs. W. L. Wharton 
Mrs. Lowell M. Whatley 
Mrs. Louis A. Wheless 



Mrs. Carleton N. Whilden, Jr. 

Mrs. Murray Whisnant 

Mrs. Billy D. Whitaker 

Ann White 

Mrs. Charles M. White 

Elizabeth S. White 

Mrs. Guy H. White, III 

Mrs. James D. White 

Mrs. J. Clark White 

Mrs. John C. White 

Larnette White 

Mrs. Leonard White 

Mrs. Nelson C. White 

Mrs. Nelson M. White, Jr. 

Mrs. Thomas K. White, Jr. 

Mrs. Vernon E. White 

Mrs. W. H. White 

Mrs. Dewey E. Whitehead 

Mrs. Richard C. Whitfield 

Flossie M. Whitley 

June Whitley 

Mrs. Lucius Whitley 

Mrs. James R. Whitmore, Jr. 

Mrs. T. W. Whitt 

Judith Carole Wicker 

Mrs. June S. Wicker 

Mrs. Talmadge J. Wiggins 

Mrs. Grover Wilkes 

Mrs. Austin H. Wilkins 

Mrs. Bruce D. Wilkins 

Mrs. John S. Wilkins 

Marguerite D. Wilkins 

Mrs. Jasper C. Wilkinson 

Mrs. T. P. Willard 

Annie Grace Williams 

Mrs. B. F. Williams 

Brenda Frances Williams 

Mrs. Charles O. Williams 

D. Evalan Williams 

Mrs. George I. Williams 

Mrs. George L. Williams 

Mrs. James E. Williams 

Mrs. James H. Williams 

Mrs. Joe C. Williams 

Mrs. Kenneth Williams 

Lena Mae Williams 

Mildred Williams 

Nancy Williams 

Mrs. Philip R. Williams 

Mrs. Thomas C. Williams 

Mrs. W. Fred Williams 

Mrs. W. L. Williams 

Mrs. Yates Williams 

Mrs. Jack Williamson. Jr. 

Mrs. Titus C. Williamson 

Mrs. E. G. Williard 

Mrs. A. R. Willis 

Mrs. Earl Willis 

Mrs. Charles E. Wilson 

Mrs. Donald Wilson 

Mrs. Noah Wilson 

Mrs. S. G. Wilson 

Mrs. W. P. Wilson 

Mrs. Carlyle R. Wimbish, Jr. 



Mrs. Donald Winchester 

Mary Virginia Winfield 

Mrs. T. C. Winn 

Mrs. William Lee Winslow 

Mrs. John L. Winstead 

Mrs. Harris Woltz 

Mrs. Thomas M. Womble, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry A. Wood 

Mrs. Loyd Wood 

Mrs. Thomas A. Wood 

Lucille Woodall 

Mrs. J. C. Woodard 

Mary Hadley Woodard 

Mrs. Richard P. Woodbury 

Mrs. W. W. Wooden 

Mrs. James W. Woodroof 

Mrs. J. Fulton Woods, Jr. 

Mrs. W. W. Woods 

Mrs. M. T. Woody 

Zella Woody 

Mrs. J. M. Woolard 

Mrs. David M. Wooten 

Mrs. Grace P. Wooten 

Jane Raye Worrell 

Mrs. David C. Worth 

Mrs. David P. Worth 

Mrs. William J. Wortman 

Carolyn Wray 

Mary Elizabeth Wrenn 

Mrs. E. E. Wright 

Mrs. James B. Wright 

Mrs. James G. Wright 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Wright 

Margaret Wright 

Mrs. Warren G. Wright 

Mrs. W. C. Wright 

Willie Wright 

Mrs. Edgar M. Wyatt 

Mrs. William L. Wyatt 

Mrs. J. E. Yarboro 
Mrs. Cecil M. Yarborough 
Mrs. Philip Yarborough 
Dr. Mary E. Yarbrough 
Mrs. Edwin Yates 
Mrs. G. C. Yates 
Mrs. S. A. Yates 
Mrs. W. B. Yearns, Jr. 
Mrs. L. P. Yelverton 
Mrs. P. C. Yeomans 
Mrs. Fred P. York 
Mrs. Arnold Young 
Edith Young 
Mrs. E. O. Young 
Judy Young 
Mrs. L. Young 
Mrs. Noel W. Young 
Mrs. Ralph L. Young 
Mrs. R. C. Young 
Mrs. R. E. Young 
Mary Ann Younts 

Mrs. Cullen C. Zimmerman 
Mrs. John W. Zimmerman, Jr 



20 




BAPTIST STATE 
:ONVENTION 
\ND LOCAL 

:hurches 

contributed 
^87,741.49 

irst Baptist Church, Raleigh 
ladison Baptist Church W.M.U. 
ullen Memorial Baptist Church, 
Raleigh 

BUSINESS 
^RMS 

contributed 
^0,845.43 

Vetna Life Insurance Co.'-' 
American Home Products Co.* 
"ameron Village, Inc. 
'apital Coca-Cola Bottling ( o. 
arolina Builders Corp. 
Larson's. Inc. 
>nlinental Baking Co. 
)illon Supply Co. 
)r. i'cppcr Bottling Co. 
V. E. Finley and Associates, Inc. 
Jirst Kederal .Savings & Loan Assn. 
'orti Motor Co.* 
■Icrculcs Powder Co.* 
Ccnnody Motors 
>lorlh Carolina Equipment Co. 
■JoucM's, Inc. 

)ccitk-ntal I ifc Insurance Co. 
'cpsi Cola Bottling Co. 



Pine State Creamery 
Raleigh Office Supply Co., Inc. 
Raleigh Savings and Loan Assn. 
Stephenson Music Co. 
Thurston Motor Lines, Inc. 



'-'' Matching Gifts 

ESTATES, 
FOUNDATIONS, 
AND 
ORGANI- 
ZATIONS 
contributed 
$4,010.00 

Estate of Mrs. Love B. Brewer 
A. E. Finley Foundation, Inc. 
P. Lorillard Company Foimdation'' 



* Matching Gifts 

FACULTY AND 
STAFF 

contributed 
$4,088.84 

Hazel Baity 

Carolyn Barrington 

Lila Bell 

Mrs. Jacqueline Bcza 

Dr. Sankcy L. Blanton 

Ann Fli/a Brewer 



Ellen D. Brewer 

Dr. Carlyle Campbell 

Lucile Dandridge 

Ann DeWitt 

Beatrice Donley 

Dr. Arthur Downs 

Louise Fleming 

Dr. Lois Frazier 

Dr. Susanne Freund 

Mrs. Phyllis W. Garriss 

Mrs. J. T. Greenwood 

Mae Grimmer 

Belle Haeseler 

Dr. Mamie Hafner 

Jennie M. Hanyen 

Mrs. Edna Hurst 

Dr. Mary Lynch Johnson 

Dr. Alice B. Keith 

Dr. lone K. Knight 

Dr. Bessie Evans Lane 

William R. Ledford 

Mrs. C. L. McCombs 

Dr. Ralph E. McLain 

Mrs. Jay D. Massey 

Kate Matthews 

Mrs. Margaret C. Morris 

David G. Olmsted 

Dr. Thomas C. Parramore 

Dr. Leishman A. Peacock 

Anna B. Peck 

Mrs. Robert A. Ponton 

Stuart Pratt 

Mrs. Edwin S. Preston, Jr. 

Dr. Helen Price 

Mrs. George B. Pruden 

Mrs. Lois S. Renfrow 

Dr. D. R. Reveley 

Mrs. Orville A. Robinson 

Dr. Norma Rose 

Mrs. MaBelle Smith 

Mrs. A. C. Snow 

Dr. Leslie Svron 

Dr. Ethel Tilley 

R. A. L. Walker 

Leonard While 

Mrs. Oscar B. Wooldridgc 

Dr. Mary E. Yarbrough 



FRIENDS 

contributed 
$11,487.72 

Anonymous 

L. Y. Ballcniinc 

Coy A. Bcckwith 

Talcod W. Brewer 

James L. Briley 

Mrs. W. Jelhro Broadwel 

Dr. Leslie H. Campbell 

W. R. ( hamhcrs 



21 



Donors for the Year 1964 



Wisner H. Chamblee 

Jyles J. Coggins 

Mrs. Frances J. Daniel 

Egbert L. Davis 

H. L. Ferguson 

L. G. Frazier 

R. E. Gaddy 

S. C. Gardner 

M. B. Garrett 

T. G. Goad 

Shearon Harris 

W. F. Haywood 

Rufus A. Hunter 

C. E. Jeflfcoat 

Dr. B. Ed Kanoy 

Pattie Lee 

Mrs. Kate P. Lipford 

George E. London 

Charles McFall 

Mr. and Mrs. Clay McCollum 

A. H. Moore 

B. H. Gates 

C. E. Page, Jr. 
James M. Poyner 
Dr. J. G. Raby 

A. Paul Rogers 

E. C. Sanders 

Hon. Terry Sanford 

W. N. Schultz 

Mrs. John M. Simms 

Haslin Simon 

Homer C. Starling 

Dr. S. L. Stealey 

Elbert V. Swann 

Lewis Turner 

Dr. Russell C. Walton, Jr. 

Dr. Frank P. Ward 

Jack Wardlaw 

Mrs. Carl Warlick 

David E. Warner 

Miss Marion Warner 

Max G. Warren 

George Waterhouse 

Mrs. 'Martha R. Waters 

A. J. Watkins 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Watkins 
Lawrence A. Watts. Jr. 
Walter A. Watts 
W. Glenn Watts 
William M. Watts 
Mrs. J. R. Weatherspoon 
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Webb 
Clark Webb 

B. C. Wells 
Sim H. Wells 
Car! S. Wester 

C. G. Westmoreland 
C. V. Whitlev 

Mrs. J. Stuart Whitley 

Stanley J. Wiemer 

J. D. Wilkins, Jr. 

Dr. Lynwood E. Williams 

Ruth C. Wilson 

Dr. W. Howard Wilson 



W. Brantley Womble 

W. M. Womble 

Smith Woodson 

Kenneth Wooten, Jr. 

L. E. Wooten 

George H. Wright, Jr. 

Edgar M. Wyatt 

William L. Wyatt 

James A. Wyche 

Lenthall Wyman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Yancey 

W. O. Yarborough 

Nathan H. Yelton 



MISCELLANEOUS 

FUNDS 

$156,540.44 



TRUSTEES 

contributed 

$5,039.00 

Mrs. Walter J. Bone 

W. Jethro Broadwell 

Mrs. Walter E. Clark 

Mrs. Egbert L. Davis, Jr. 

Charles B. Deane 

Dr. Elizabeth J. Dotterer 

Dr. Paul D. Early 

The Rev. Hatcher S. Elliott 

J. Holt Evans 

Mrs. Foy J. Farmer 

Mrs. William H. Farrier, Jr. 

Mrs. E. Norfleet Gardner 

Hayden B. Hayes 

Colonel W. T. Joyner 

J. M. Kesler 

Mrs. Leland Kitchin 

Mrs. Thomas B. Knight 

C. Gordon Maddrey 




Dr. L. M. Massey 
Mrs. Charles S. Norwood 
Herman A. Rhinehart 
Mrs. Leon W. Robertson 
The Rev. Ernest P. Russell 
John NL Simms 
Dr. Marvin L. Slate 
John A. Stevens 
W. Hal Trentman 
Straughan H. Watkins 
Mrs. William M. Watts 
William H. Westphal 



STUDENTS 

contributed 

$158.40 

Lynn Abraham 
Anonymous 
Mary Arakas 
Judy Atkins 
Faye Autry 

Seale Bagnal 
Cheryl Ballard 
Dudley Barbee 
Kay Barnes 
Nancy Batson 
Sue Bell 
Di.xie Bennett 
Mary Ann Berry 
Gayle Biggs 
Susan Blanchard 
Mary Ann Bosher 
Linda Brame 
Martha Branon 
Connie Brantley 
Ginny Brown 
Johnsie Brown 
Nancy Jean Buffaloe 
Dottie Bullock 
Patsy Burks 
Carol Burris 

Susan Caison 
Patsy Callahan 
Carroll Capell 
Marilyn Carter 
Sarah Carver 
Alice Coleman 
Susan Collins 
Donna Cooper 
Judy Coram 
Nell Cox 
Nancy Craig 
Jean Craven 
Becky Craver 
Laurie Cress 
Ann Crockett 



22 



Betsy Denson 
Dottie Dixon 
Delia Ann Dozier 
Diane Drake 
Donna Dull 

Dclila Edenfield 
Rebecca Edmondson 
Phyllis Edwards 

Wadad Fayad 
Gay Felton 
June Fisher 
Nancy Flood 

Linda Gallehugh 
Frances Garrett 
Nancy Garrett 
Mary Gay 
Robin Gentry 
Lynda Gregory 
Carolyn Griffin 
Judy Griffin 
Suzanne Guthrie 

Ann Hampton 
Judy Hamrick 
Lyn JJarris 
Crystal Hartness 
Anita Hauser 
Kay JJedrick 
Joanna Helms 
Cynthia Henderson 
lane Hendricks 
Phyllis Hester 
Laura Hill 
Irene Hines 
Elaine Holt 
Charlene Hord 
Kayc Howard 
loan Hull 

lohnctte Ingold 
Betty Ipock 

Karen Jenkins 
RchL^ca Jessup 
Beth Johnson 
Montinc Johnson 
Nancy Jones 
ludy Journigan 

Ann Kanipe 
Lou Ross Kesler 
Mary Jo King 

Nela Anne Lee 
lane I conard 
lean levin 
Carlton Lipscomb 
Carol Lloyd 
Jean Lyics 



Martha McArthur 
Nancy McClenny 
Mary Ann McCurdy 
Judy McDutfie 
Harriet McLoud 

Pris Macomber 
Price Marsh 
Jerry Martin 
Peggy Matthews 
Sandra Mayhew 
Elizabeth Maynard 
Jan Miller 
Martha Mills 
Anne Mintz 
Armida Mitchell 
Linda Mitchell 
Marshall Moore 
Ellen Morton 

Harriette Neal 

Ruth Overman 

Anne Parker 
Becky Parker 
Dianne Parker 
Eleanor Parker 
Pat Peterson 




Brenda Petty 
Martha Gatlin Phillips 
Mary Ellen Phillips 
Martha Plyler 
Martha Poage 
Anne Pepper Poole 
Bonnie Poplin 
Mary F. Potter 
Janet Pugh 

Judy Ratley 
Elizabeth Reavis 
Becky Reich 
Sonja Reynolds 
Bonita Riffle 
Judy Riley 
Betty Jo Roach 

Mary Thomas Salmon 

Jeanie Sams 

Janice Sanford 

Corinne Savage 

Penn Savage 

Betsy Scarborough 

Agnes Schertz 

Marie Sherrill 

Tennie Sink 

Beth Smith 

Helen Smith 

Georgette Sowell 

Betty Spence 

Jean Stafford 

Pat Sterling 

Sara Jane Stewart 

Anne Stone 

Susan Stone 

Judy Strickland 

Patricia Strickland 

Alycc Stroud 

Ginny Sutton 

Sarah Jane Teague 
Sandra Temple 
Sandra Thompson 
Lee Todd 

Elizabeth Vestal 

Jane Waller 
Kathy Walslon 
Elizabeth Walkins 
Elaine Wclborn 
Candace VVclstcd 
Molly White 
Nell Wilkcrson 
Susan Wilkins 
Brenda Wilson 
Pat Womble 
Millicent Wood 

Ann Yoimg 
Mary Young 
Virginia Young 



The Development Committee . . . 



... OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Last year, the Development Committee of the Board of Trustees 
created the MC-1 Club . . . "in on effort to promote interest in 
the ever-expanding needs of the institution which we serve, and to 
encourage systematic giving to our college. . . ." To become a 
member, one contributes $100.00 or more to the College. An annual 
gift of like amount will retain one's eligibility for MC-1. Since the 
club's inception, the 188 friends listed on the next page have be- 
come qualified to receive the attractive emblem of membership. 
Several of them have sent their gifts for the second year. We hope 
that oil who are now active will renew their membership and that 
many new members will join them in the club. 



The necessity for a new library as well as other facilities to 
accommodate 1,000 students calls for a more intense program of 
development in these times. Our committee has therefore recom- 
mended to the President and to the Board of Trustees that additional 
personnel— both in the field and in the office— be secured for the 
Office of Development, formerly the Department of Public Relations. 



John A . Stevens 

Chairman Development 

Committee of The 

Board of Trustees 




24 



Donors for the Year 1964 



MC-1 
CLUB 



Mrs. James B. Adams 
Mrs. C. G. Auerswald 

Hazel Baity 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine 

Mabel Ballentine 

Mrs. J. M. Banner 

Mrs. Madge D. Barber 

Coy A. Beclcwith 

Jeannette Biggs 

Mrs. Richard F. Bigham 

Dr. Sankey L. Blanton 

Mrs. Walter J. Bone 

Mrs. William O. Bradford 

Ellen Brewer 

Talcott W. Brewer 

Mrs. J. A. Bridger 

Margaret Bright 

Mrs.. James N. Britt. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Broadwell 

Mrs. E. W. Buchanan 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn 

Cameron Village, Inc. 
Dr. Carlyle Campbell 
Mrs. Daniel W. Campbell 
Dr. Leslie H. Campbell 
Capital Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Carolina Builders Corporation 
Joyce Causey 
W. R. Chambers 
Wisner H. Chamblee 
Mrs. C. R. Christiansen 
Jylcs J. Cocgins 
Mrs. T. D. Crews 

Mr. and Mrs. Egbert L. Davis, Jr. 

Mrs. Howard G. Dawkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Doane 

Mrs. Rufus DeVane Dickson 

Dillon Supply Company 

Dr. Elizabeth J. Dotterer 

Dr. Pepper Bottling Company 

Mrs. Elmore Earp 
Mrs. Robert D. Elinor 
J. Holt Evans 

Mrs. Foy J. Farmer 

Mrs. William H. Farrier 

Mrs. Charles D. Faucette 

Mrs. J. Grady Faidk 

H. I . Ferguson 

A. E. Finlcy and Associates. Inc. 

A. E. Finlcy Foundation. Inc. 

First Baptist Church, Raleigh 

First Federal Savings and Loan 

Association 
Louise Fleming 
Dr. Lois Frazier 
Mrs. I.idic P. Freeman 

T. G. Goad 
Lina M. Gough 



Helen Graves 
Mae F. Grimmer 

Dr. Mamie Hafner 

Mrs. F. B. Hamrick 

Jennie M. Hanyen 

Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Hartness 

Hayden B. Hayes 

Mrs. James M. Hayes 

W. F. Haywood 

Mrs. D. E. Henderson 

Mrs. Jesse J. Henderson 

Mrs. John L. Henderson 

Nonie Herring 

Mrs. Malcolm L. Holmes, Jr. 

Ruth A. Hubbell 

Mrs. Samuel H. Husbands 

Mrs. Jim Jenkins 
Dr. Meredith Johnson 
Dr. Mary Lynch Johnson 
Mrs. Carl C. Jones, Jr. 
Colonel W. T. Joyner 

Dr. B. Ed Kanoy 
Dr. Alice B. Keith 
Mrs. L. H. Kilchin 
Dr. lone K. Knight 
Mrs. Thomas B. Knight 

Mrs. Jen P. Lambe 

Pattie Lee 

Mrs. Jack Levine 

Mrs. Richard H. McCaskill 

Mr. and Mrs. Clay McCollom 

Charles McFall 

Nash McKee 

Dr. Ralph E. McLain 

Dr. L. M. Massey 

Carolyn M. Mercer 

Mrs. Ada Mims 

Irene Money 

Mrs. Margaret C. Morris 

Virginia A. Morris 

The News and Observer — The 

Raleigh Times 
North Carolina Equipment Co. 
Mrs. C. S. Norwood 

B. H. Gates 

Occidental Life Insurance Co. 
Mrs. Eugene Olive 
David G. Olmsted 

Mrs. Ben Parham 
Dr. L, A. Peacock 
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company 
Mrs. Clifford W. Perry 
Mrs. D. Earl Petty 
Pine State Creamery 
Mrs. David Pinkas 
Florence Pittman 

C. Parker Poole 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Roy Poole 
Mrs. R. Hunter Pope 



Mary Hester Powell 
James M. Poyner 
Dr. Helen Price 

Dr. J. G. Raby 

Raleigh Office Supply Company 

Raleigh Savings and Loan Assn. 

Mrs. Ogden A. Rankin 

Mrs. S. W. Rawls 

Mrs. Burton J. Ray 

Mrs. James W. Reid 

Mrs. Eleanor H. Reynolds 

Mrs. Thomas B. Reynolds 

Mrs. Leon W. Robertson 

Josephine G. Robinson 

Dr. Eleanor Rodwell 

A. P. Rogers 

Mrs. Charles N. Rogers 

Dr. Norma Rose 

Mrs. J. A. Riidisill 



E. C. Sanders 

Hon. Terry Sanford 

Mrs. J. H. Sawyer 

Mrs. Julian H. Scarborough 

W. N. Schultz 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Simms 

Haslin Simon 

Dr. Marvin L. Slate 

Mrs. Solon Smart 

Mrs. MaBelle Smith 

Mrs. T. Barton Smoot 

Mrs. Holly W. Sphar 

Mr. and Mrs. I. N. Stanback 

Mrs. Raney Stanford 

Homer C. Starling 

John A. Stevens 

Mrs. Alton Stone 

Carson Stout 

Elbert V. Swann 

Dr. Leslie Syron 

Mrs. Edward Teague 
Ella G. Thompson 
Thurston Motor Lines 
Dr. Ethel Tilley 
Mrs. William E. Tomlinson 
W. Hal Trcnlman 
Lewis Turner 



Dorothy Vann 
Dr. Elizabeth Vann 



Mrs. Michael W. Wasell 
A. J. Walkins 
Slrauchan 11. Walkins 
Mr. and Mrs W. Glenn Watts 
Mrs. William NL Watts 
Mrs. Mabel S. Wealherspoon 
W. Herbert Weatherspoon 
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Webb 
William H. Westphal 
Mrs. Vernon E. White 
Mrs. George W. Wray 
George H. Wright. Jr. 
Mrs. William 1. Wvatt 



25 



If You Have a Daughter at Meredith . 



... You are naturally concerned that she is receiving the best 
education that an institution of higher learning has to offer. 
Through its 66 years of teaching young women, Meredith has 
produced outstanding graduates; it will continue to do so. There 
ore areas in which parents of students can actively participate in 
helping to make possible the type of facilities desirable for a college 
such as Meredith. The Trustees and other experts see a new 
and adequate library as the greatest physical need on the campus. 
Mrs. J. Alonzo Burris of Lincolnton, North Carolina, the mother 
of a Meredith student, hos already been communicating with parents 
OS to how they can have a part in the exciting project that will 
be the very heart of the academic pursuits at Meredith — the 
Carlyle Campbell Library. 




Mrs. J. Alonzo Burris 

and her daughter, Carole 

a first-year student 

at Meredith 



'* ... But as a worthy life is ever a compound 

of memory and hope, an institution committed 

to the abundant life can properly reflect on its 

accomplishments only as a basis of confidence 

in attacking the unfinished business ahead. " 



-CARLYLE CAMPBELL 



Series 58 



March. 1965 



No. 1 



Published quarterly by MEREDITH COLLEGE. 

at Raleigh, North Carolina 

Entered January 13, 1908, at Raleigh, N. C, as 

Second-Class Matter under Act of 

Congress July 16, 1894. 



ENTERED AS 

SECOND CLASS 

MATTER 




Meredith 

College 
Bulletin 



1/. ,' -7 
C A T A L O G I S S U E : A P R I L 1 9 6 5 



Meredith 



College 



Bulletin 



Announcements for 1965-1966 




U A I. K 1 G H . NORTH C A R (1 1 1 N A 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

Please address inquiries as indicated below so as to insure 
prompt handling: 

Academic Records Registrar 

Admissions •. Dean of the College 

Alumnae Matters Alumnae Secretary 

Business Matters Business Manager and Treasurer 

Educational Programs Dean of the College 

Employment of Students Business Manager 

Expansion Program Office of Development 

Expenses Business Manager and Treasurer 

General Information ...Office of the President 

News Items News Bureau 

Scholarships and Student Aid President 

Self-Help Business Manager 

Student Interests.. Dean of Students 

Student Recruitment Assistant, Office of Admissions 

Student Reports — Registrar 

Summer School Dean of the College 

Transcripts Registrar 

An index at the back of this book will help you to use this 
catalogue to a greater advantage. 

Visitors are always welcome on the Meredith campus. Write 
the Office of Development for information and for arranging 
tours of the campus. 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 
April, 1965 




Announcements jar 1965-1966 



Raleigh 



North Carohna 



Published quarterly by Meredith College at Raleigh, N. C. Entered 
January 13. 1908, at Raleigh, N. C. as second-class matter under act of 
Congress of July 16, 1894. 



Series 58 



APRIL, 1965 



No. 2 



Contents 

Communications with College Inside Front Cover 

College Calendar 5 

Recognition 7 

Purpose and Policy 7 

Board of Trustees 9 

Officers of Administration 10 

Faculty 12 

Faculty and Staff Committees 16 

Officers of the Alumnae Association 17 

General Information 18 

Location 18 

Expenses 24 

Scholarships 26 

Student Loan Funds 27 

Summer Session 28 

Requirements for Admission 30 

Requirements for Degrees 35 

General Academic Regulations 35 

Courses of Instruction 46 

Degrees Conferred 85 

Register of Students 88 

Index 104 



1965 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


1 2 
3 4 6 6 7 8 6 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 26 26 27 28 29 30 

ai 


1 2 3 

4 6 8 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 IS 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

26 28 27 28 29 30 


1 2 3 

4 6 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 1516 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

26 26 27 28 20 30 11 


1 2 
3 4 6 6 7 8 9 
10 11 1213 14 16 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 26 28 27 28 28 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


12 3 4 6 6 
7 8 9 101112 13 
14 16 18 1718 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 


1 

2 3 4 5 8 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 16 

18 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 121314 
IB 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 28 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 6 6 

7 8 8 10 11 12 13 

14 16 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 26 26 27 

28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


12 3 4 6 8 

7 8 10 11 12 13 

14 16 18 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 26 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 6 

8 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 28 
27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

6 8 7 8 91011 

12 13 14 16 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 26 

26 27 26 29 30 


12 3 4 

6 8 7 8 910 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



1966 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 6 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 2122 

23 24 26 26 27 26 29 

30 31 


1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 6 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 13 19 20 2122 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


1 2 
3 4 6 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 5 8 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 2122 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 910 It 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


12 3 4 6 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F 8 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



College Calendar 



SUMMER SESSION, 1965 



June 


7 


Monday 


Registration, 2:00 p.m. 




8 


Tuesday 


Beginning of classes, 
7:45 a.m. 




14-18 


Mon.-Fri. 


School of Christian Studies 


July 


16 


Friday 


Examinations 




17 


Saturday 


Commencement Exercises 




FIRST SEMESTER, 1965-1966 


September 


8 


Wednesday 


Arrival of all new students 




9-13 


Thurs.-Mon. 


Orientation program for all 
new students 




11 


Saturday 


Registration of freshmen and 
transfer students 




13 


Monday 


Registration of returning stu- 
dents 




14 


Tuesday 


Beginning of classes, 
8:25 a.m. 




25 


Saturday 


Last day for class-schedule 
changes 




28 


Tuesday 


Meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees 


October 


28 


Thursday 


Founders' Day 


November 


8-10 


Mon.-Wed. 


Examinations on "block" 
courses 




12 


Friday 


Mid-semester reports 




24 


Wednesday 


Beginning of Thanksgiving 
recess, 1:00 p.m. 




29 


Monday 


Resumption of classes, 
8:25 a.m. 


December 


12 


Sunday 


Program of Christmas music 




18 


Saturday 


Beginning of Christmas re- 
cess, 12:30 p.m. 


January 


3 


Monday 


Resumption of classes, 
8:25 a.m. 




15 


Saturday 


Reading Day 




17-22 


Mon.-Sat. 


First-semester examinations 




22 


Saturday 


Commencement exercises 



(5) 



6 



Meredith College 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1965-1966 



January 26 Wednesday 

27 Thursday 

February 8 Tuesday 

7-11 Mon.-Fri. 

19 Saturday 

22 Tuesday 

March 17-18 Thurs.-Fri. 

22 Tuesday 

24-26 Thurs.-Sat. 

April 7 Thursday 

13 Wednesday 

30 Saturday 

May 20 Friday 

21-27 Sat.-Fri. 

28-30 Sat.-Mon. 



Registration for second se- 
mester 

Beginning of classes, 
8:25 a.m. 

Last day for class-schedule 
changes 

Religious Emphasis Week 

Last day to file applications 
for degrees in June, 1966 

Meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees 

Sophomore Testing Program 
Mid-semester reports due 
Examinations in "block" 
courses 

Beginning of spring recess, 

1:00 p.m. 
Resumption of classes, 

8:25 a.m. 
May Day 

Reading Day 

Second-semester examina- 
tions 
Commencement exercises 



Purpose and Policy 



"The purpose of Meredith College is to develop in its students 
the Christian attitude toward the whole of life, and to prepare 
them for intelligent citizenship, home-making, graduate study, 
and for professional and other fields of service. Its intention is to 
provide not only thorough instruction, but also culture made 
perfect through the religion of Jesus Christ. These ideals of 
academic integrity and religious influence have always been 
cherished at Meredith." 

". . . that Meredith College, a liberal arts college for women, 
should continue to emphasize and develop its academic program 
in terms of scholastic standards and service, giving appropriate 
attention to requirements for the admission and retention of 
students, the formulation and administration of its curriculum, 
and the maintenance of procedures implicit in an educational 
institution of high quality; 

"and that, as a Christian college, Meredith should be primarily 
concerned to inculcate attitudes, provide activities, and promote 
learning calculated to deepen and broaden the Christian experi- 
ence of its students and to prepare them for maximum service 
in the Christian enterprise." 

— from Purpose and Policy, as re- 
stated by Board of Trustees, 1954 



Recognition 



Meredith College is a member of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and the Association of American Colleges. 
Graduates of Meredith are eligible for membership in the Amer- 
ican Association of University Women. Meredith College is a 
liberal arts member of the National Association of Schools of 
Music. 



(7) 



Organization 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Charles B. Deane Chairman 

Howard R. Boozer Vice Chairman 

Virginia L. Wood Secretary 

George Silver Treasurer 

Terms Expire 1965 

Hubert M. Craig Lincolnton 

Charles B. Deane Rockingham 

lone K. Knight Madison 

E. L. Rankin, Jr Raleigh 

Bland B. Pruitt Louisburg 

Virginia L. Robertson Rocky Mount 

Virginia L. Wood Leaksville 

Terms Eocpire 1966 

Howard R. Boozer Raleigh 

Bunah L. Clark Asheville 

Eleanor L. Davis Winston-Salem 

Roberts Lasater Charlotte 

John A. Stevens Wilmington 

W. H. Trentman Raleigh 

Straughan H. Watkins Henderson 

Terms Expire 1967 

Hugh G. Ashcraft Charlotte 

W. J. Broadwell Durham 

Christine B. Farrior Williamston 

John M. Lewis Raleigh 

Thomas L. Rich, Jr Fairmont 

Charles R. Tucker Cary 

Wm. H. Westphal Greensboro 

Terms Expire 1968 

Edwin S. Coates Raleigh 

R. W. Kicklighter Elizabeth City 

L. M. Massey Zebulon 

Donald G. Myers Reidsville 

Mary C. Norwood Goldsboro 

W. Roy Poole Kinston 

W. Fred Williams Greensboro 

Executive Committee 
E. L. Rankin, Jr., Chairman L. M. Massey 

Howard R. Boozer, Vice Chairman W. H. Trentman 

W. J. Broadwell Charles R. Tucker 

Edwin S. Coates Straughan H. Watkins 

John M. Lewis Wm. H. Westphal 

W. Fred Williams 

(9) 



Administration 

President Carlyle Campbell, A.M., LL.D. 

Director of Development Sankey L. Blanton, D.D. 

Dean Leishman A. Peacock, Ph.D. 

Business Manager and Treasurer George Silver, Ed.D. 

Dean oj Students Louise E. Fleming, A.M. 



Library 



Librarian Hazel Baity, A.B. in L.S. 

Asst. Librarian 

Jane Greene, A.B. in L.S., A.M. 
Assistant Virginia B. Pruden, A.B. 

Assistant Dorothy F. McCombs, A.B. 

Assistant Hannah B. Carter, A.B. 



Records 

Student Personnel 



Registrar 



Mary Bland Josey, A.B. 



Asst. Dean oj Students 

Lucile Peak, M.R.E. 
Asst. Dean of Students MaBelle Smith 
Asst. Dean of Students 

Judy G. McLamb, A.B., B.D. 



Religious Activities Director 
Health Service 



R.A.L. Walker, A.M., B.D. 



Alumnae Association 

New^s Bureau 
Dining Hall 

Dormitories 
Buildings & Grounds 



Physician William J. Senter, B.S., M.D. 
Nurse Edna Hurst, R.N. 

Nurse Lucy H. Saunders, R.N. 

Executive Secretary 

Margaret C. Morris, A.B., A.M. 
Assistant Kate Matthews, A.B. 

Assistant Elizabeth H. Ponton, A.B. 

Director Faye B. Humphries, B.S. 

Dietitian Harriet Holler, B.S. 

Assistant Elizabeth E. Rice, B.S. 

Hostess Frances E. Thorne 

House Director Martha J. Whilden 

Asst. House Director Lucille Dandridge 



Superintendent 
(10) 



Harry Simmons 



Equitation 
Supply Store 
Secretarial Staff 



Organization 
Director 
Manager 



11 
Mary M. Edwards 

Dru M. Kinsley, A.B. 



Secretary to the President 

Lois S. Renfrow 

Secretary to the Director of Development 

Carolyn C. Robinson, A.B. 

Secretary to the Dean Mary K. Hamilton 

Secretary to the Dean 

Martha C. Wooldridge 
Secretary to the Registrar 

Ann DeWitt, A.B. 
Secretary to the Registrar 

DeCelia Whitehurst, A. B. 
Accountant Gwen P. Davis, A.B. 

Bookkeeper Pauline I. Gay 

Secretary to the Business Manager 

Virginia Scarboro 
Secretary Business Office 

Marilyn R. Rieger 
Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Betty Jean Yeager, A.B. 
Secretary, Alumnae Office 

Evelyn R. Posey 



Faculty^ 



CARLYLE CAMPBELL (1939), A.M., LL.D. President 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University; LL.D., University of South Carolina, Wake For- 
est College 

LEISHMAN A. PEACOCK (1948), Ph.D. Dean 

A.B., A.M., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

ERNEST F. CANADAY (1920), Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., William Jewell College; A.M., University of Missouri; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

ELLEN DOZIER BREWER (1919), A.M. 

Professor of Home Economics 
A.B., Meredith College; B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

HARRY E. COOPER (1937), MUS.D., F.A.G.O. Professor of Music 
A.B., Ottawa University; Mus.B., Horner Institute of Fine 
Arts; Mus.D., Bush Conservatory; Fellow, American Guild of 
Organists; Guy Weitz, London 

MARY YARBROUGH (1928), Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
A.B., Meredith College; M.S., North Carolina State College; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

JOHN A. YARBROUGH (1943), Ph.D. Professor of Biology 

A.B., Oklahoma Baptist University; M.S., University of Okla- 
homa; Ph.D., State University of Iowa; Graduate Student, 
Northwestern University 

QUENTIN OLIVER McALLISTER (1944), Ph.D. 

Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., A.M., Washington and Jefferson College; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh 

RALPH E. McLAIN (1945), Ph.D. Professor of Religion 

A.B., Muskingum College; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Graduate Student, Columbia University, 
University of Chicago 

MARY LYNCH JOHNSON (1918), Ph.D. L.H.D. Professor of English 
A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
Cornell University; L.H.D., Wake Forest College 

STUART PRATT (1942), Mus.M. Professor of Music 

A.B., Hartwick College; Mus.B., Philadelphia Musical Acad- 
emy; Mus.M., Syracuse University; Two years in Berlin; Marta 
Siebold, Hugo Kaun, Walter Scharwenka, Egon Petri 



1 The date after a name indicates the first year of service as a member of the 
faculty of Meredith College. 

(12) 



Organization 13 

DAVID R. REVELEY (1955), Ph.D. Professor of Education 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Virginia 

LESLIE W. SYRON (1945), Ph.D. Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Mary Baldwin College; A.M. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina 

NORMA ROSE (1937), Ph.D. Professor of English 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D., Yale University 

ROGER H. CROOK (1949), Th.D. Professor of Religion 

A.B., Wake Forest College; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Graduate Student, Duke University 

ETHEL TILLEY (1951), Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology and Philosophy 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A.M., Ph.D., Boston Univer- 
sity 

LOIS FRAZIER (1954), Ed.D. Professor of Business and Economics 
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina; Ed.D., Indiana University 

SARAH McCULLOH LEMMON (1947), Ph.D. Professor of History 
B.S., Madison College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina 

JENNIE M. HANYEN (1931), A.M. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

BEATRICE DONLEY (1942), B.M. Associate Professor of Music 

B.M. ( Voice) , B.M. ( Public School Music) , West Virginia Uni- 
versity; Voice with Horatio Conncll, Juilliard School of Music; 
Voice with Adelaide Gescheidt, New York 

HARRY K. DORSETT (1941), A.M. Associate Professor of Education 
A.B., Wake Forest (College; A.M., Columbia University; Gradu- 
ate Student, George Peabody College for Teachers 

SUSANNE H. FREUND (1947), Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Abiturium, Berlin; Ph.D., University of Heidelberg 

lONE KEMP KNIGHT (1956), Ph.D. Associate Professor of English 
A.B., Meredith College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

LILA BELL (1941), M.Ed. Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Ed., Duke 
University; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina 

LEONARD WHITE (1964), A.M. Associate Professor of Art 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina 



14 Meredith College 

HELEN JO COLLINS (1944), M.S. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Colorado State Agricultural College; M.S., Iowa State 
College 

EDWIN K. BLANCHARD (1952), M.Mus. Assistant Professor of Music 
Diploma, Georgetown University; B.Mus., M.Mus., Eastman 
School of Music; Graduate Student, University of Rochester; 
Voice with Joseph Duval, Clyde Miller 

JAY D. MASSEY (1957), A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; A.M., New 
York University 

JAMES H. EADS, JR (1958), M.S. Assistant Professor of Biology 

A.B., University of Kansas; M.S., University of Alabama; 
Graduate Student, University of Alabama 

PHYLLIS W. GARRISS (1951), M.Mus. Assistant Professor of Music 
A.B., B.M., Hastings College; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music 

BERNARD H. COCHRAN (1960), Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Religion 
A.B., Stetson University; B.D., Th.M., Southeastern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University 

ARTHUR C. DOWNS, JR. (1961), Ed.D. Assistant Professor of Art 
B.F.A., Philadelphia Museum College of Art; A.M., Ed.D., Co- 
lumbia University 

MAMIE HAFNER (1953-55; 1962), Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., University of Alabama; A.M., University of North Caro- 
lina; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

ELEANOR KRUMMEL (1962), A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., A.M., Duke University; B.S. in Music, Institute of Musi- 
cal Art; Graduate Student, University of North Carolina; Uni- 
versity of Piotiers 

FRANK L. GRUBBS (1963), Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Lynchburg College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

JAMES L. CLYBURN (1958), M.S. Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., Elon College; M.S., Juilliard School of Music 

DAN McGEE (1964), B.D. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Furman University; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary; Graduate Student, Duke University 

WILLIAM R. LEDFORD (1957), A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., Berea College; A.M., State University of Iowa; Graduate 
Student, Middlebury College, University of North Carolina 

THOMAS C. PARRAMORE (1962), Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 



Organization 15 

HELENA W. ALLEN (1952), M.Ed. Instructor in Physical Education 
B.S., M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

RUTH B. ROBINSON (1953), M.Ed. Instructor in Business 

B.S., Oregon State College; M.Ed., University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro 

ISABELLE HAESELER (1956), M.S.M. Instructor in Music 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S.M., Union Theological 
Seminary; Graduate Student, Colorado Seminary, University 
of Nortli Carolina 

DOROTHY P. GREENWOOD (1959), A.M. Instructor in English 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; A.M., Tulane Uni- 
versity; Graduate Student, Columbia University, North Caro- 
lina State College 

DOROTHY K. PRESTON (1961), A.M. Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B., Meredith College; A.M., Columbia University 

P. A. CLINE, JR. (1962), A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languages 

A.B., Wake Forest College; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; A.M., University of North Carolina 

J. HENRY COFFER, JR. (1962), Th.M. Instructor in Religion 

A.B., Mercer University; B.D., Yale University; Th.M., South- 
eastern Baptist Theological Seminary; Graduate Student, 
Duke University 

VIRGINIA J. HOOD (1962), M.Ed. 

Instructor in Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Michigan State University; M.Ed., University of North 
Carolina 

EVELYN P. SIMMONS (1962), M.S. Instructor in Economics 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women; M.S., University of 
Tennessee; Graduate Student, University of Florida, Duke 
University 

CAROLYN BARRINGTON (1963), M.A.T. Instructor in History 

A.B., Meredith College; M.A.T. Duke University; Graduate 
Student, Columbia University 

VERGEAN R. BIRKIN (1963), A.M. Instructor in Geography 

A.B., A.M.. University of Colorado; Graduate Student, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

STEPHEN E. YOUNG (1963), S.M.M., A.A.G.O. Instructor in Music 
A.B., Stanford University; S.M.M., Union Theological Semi- 
nary, Associate, American Guild of Organists 

ROBERT G. FRACKER (1962), A.M. Instructor in Education 

B.S., East Tennessee State College; M.S., Appalachian State 
Teachers College; Graduate Student, Duke University 

GENEVA MARTIN (1957), A.B. Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B., Western Kentucky Teachers College; Graduate Student, 
North Carolina State College, University of North Carolina 



16 Meredith College 

JACQUELINE B. BEZA ( 1964) , A.M. Instructor in Foreign Languages 
A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina 

CAROLYN M. HAPPER (1964), A.M. Instructor in History 

A.B., Duke University; A.M., University of North Carolina 

DIANA HARMON ( 1964 ) , A.M. Instructor in Art 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina; Graduate Student, 
Union Theological Seminary, La Sorbonne 

NANCY H. SNOW (1964)i, A.M. Instructor in English 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; A.M., 
Northwestern University 

RUTH ANN BAKER (1965)2, A.M. Instructor in English 

A.B., Fort Hays Kansas State College; A.M., Kansas State 
College 



PART-TIME FACULTY MEMBERS 

ELIZABETH S. CHAMBERLAIN (1961), A.M. English 

A.B., Wellesley College; A.M., University of Michigan 

HELEN P. KELMAN (1961), A.M. Biology 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; A.M., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

FRANCES W. STEVENS (1961), A.M. Physical Education 

A.B., Mary Washington College; A.M., New York University 



FACULTY AND STAFF COMMITTEES FOR 1964-65 

Administrative Council — Mr. Campbell, Mr. Peacock, Miss Fleming, 
Miss Baity, Miss Josey; chairmen of academic departments 

Admissions — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Crook, Miss Fleming, Miss Johnson, 
Miss Josey 

Auditorium — Miss Fleming, Mrs. Massey, Mr. Pratt, Mr. Silver, Mr. 
Walker 

Budget — Mr. Crook, Miss Baity, Mr. Canaday, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Pea- 
cock, Mr. Silver, Miss Syron 

Concerts, Lectures — Miss Syron, Mrs. Garriss, Miss Knight, Mr. Mc- 
Allister, Mr. McLain, Mr. White, Mr. Yarbrough 

Curriculum — Mr. Peacock, Mr. Cooper, Miss Johnson, Miss Lemmon, 
Mr. McLain, Mr. Reveley, Miss Yarbrough 

Instruction — Miss Rose, Miss Bell, Mr. Cochran, Mr. Eads, Miss Frazier, 
Mrs. Freund, Mr. Parramore 



1 First Semester 

2 Second Semester 



Organization 17 

Library — Miss Baity, Mr. Cline, Mr. Downs, Mr. Fracker, Miss Hafner, 
Miss Tilley, Mr. Yarbrough 

Orientation — Mr. Coffer, Mrs. Allen, Mr. Blanchard, Mrs. Collins, Mr. 
Dorsett, Miss Josey, Miss McLamb 

Scholarships — Mr. Peacock, Miss Fleming, Mr. Grubbs, Miss Knight, 
Mr. McAllister, Mr. McLain, Mr. Silver 

Social Functions — Miss Fleming, Miss Brewer, Miss Donley, Miss 
Hanyen, Mrs. Holler, Mrs. Morris, Mrs. Whilden 

Student Government — Miss Fleming, Mr. Peacock, Mr. Cochran, Mr. 
Grubbs, Miss Knight, Mrs. Preston, Miss Syron, Miss Yarbrough 

Student Health — Mrs. Massey, Mrs. Holler, Mrs. Hurst, Mr. Senter, 
Mrs. Whilden 

Vocational Information — Mr. Walker, Miss Barrington, Mr. Blrkin, Mr. 
Dorsett, Miss Haeseler, Miss McLamb, Mrs. Simmons 



OFFICERS OF THE MEREDITH COLLEGE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 1964-1965 

Mrs. John A. Edwards, Raleigh President 

Mrs. Charles S. Sullivan, Durham Past President 

Mrs. I. L. Clayton, Raleigh Vice-President 

Mrs. Keith A. Arledge, Hendersonville Vice-President 

(Asheville Division) 

Mrs. John W. Walker, Jr., Charlotte Vice-President 

(Charlotte Division) 

Mrs. S. E. Briley, Goldsboro Vice-President 

(Elizabeth City Division) 

Mrs. Leonard L. Bingham, Greensboro Vice-President 

(Greensboro Division) 

Mrs. Donald H. Humphrey, Shannon Vice-President 

(Wilmington Division) 

Mrs. Wm. H. Simpson, Raleigh Recording Secretary 

Mrs. Margaret C. Morris Executive Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. John W. Franklin, Durham / 

Mrs. Waller G. Henderson, Burlington \ AIumnae-ot-Large 

Mrs. J. Ed Smith, Columbia, S. C Commencement Speaker 

2 



General Information 

Meredith College, founded by the North Carolina Baptist Con- 
vention, was granted a charter in 1891, and was first opened to 
students in September, 1899. It was chartered as the Baptist 
Female University, a name changed in 1905 to the Baptist Uni- 
versity for Women, and in 1909 to Meredith College. This last 
name was given in honor of Thomas Meredith, for many years 
a recognized leader of the Baptist denomination in North Caro- 
lina, who in 1838 presented to the Baptist State Convention a res- 
olution urging the establishment in or near Raleigh of "a female 
seminary of high order that should be modeled and conducted 
on strictly religious principles, but that should be, so far as pos- 
sible, free from sectarian influences." 

The institution has had four presidents: James Carter Blas- 
ingame, 1899-1900; Richard Tilman Vann, 1900-1915; Charles 
Edward Brewer, 1915-1939; Carlyle Campbell, 1939—. 

LOCATION 

Meredith College, with a campus of 170 acres, is located in the 
capital city of North Carolina. This area, the educational center 
of the state, provides many religious, social, and educational ad- 
vantages. The campus may be found on U. S. Route 1 in the 
western part of the city. 

BUILDINGS 

The administration building, four dormitories, and the dining 
hall — all brick fireproof structures — form a quadrangle around 
a court. Johnson Hall contains on the first floor administrative 
offices and reception rooms; on the second floor the library and 
rooms for the use of non-resident students; and on the third floor 
an assembly room for the two literary societies. The dormitories 
—Brewer Hall, Faircloth Hall, Vann Hall, and Stringfield Hall- 
accommodate from 140 to 170 students in each building. The 
rooms in the dormitories, planned for two students each, are 
arranged in suites of two with a connecting bath. Each occupant 
has a single bed and a closet of her own. There is a social room 
on each floor. A kitchenette, a pressing room and a launderette 
are available in each dormitory. 

On the east side of the campus, adjoining the quadrangle, 
Poteat Hall, the senior dormitory, was completed for use in 1962. 
Jones Hall, the auditorium and music building was completed 
for use in 1950. The two-story building contains a large audi- 
torium, a lobby, a reception room, and facilities for the Depart- 

(18) 



General Information 19 

ment of Music; studios, offices and classrooms, a small assembly 
hall, practice rooms, a music library, a listening room, a record- 
ing studio, an instrument storage room, and provision for organ 
pumps and equipment. Storage space and a set-construction shop 
under the main stage are provided for college dramatic produc- 
tions. 

West of Vann Hall is Joyner Hall, a modern classroom build- 
ing of two floors opened in 1956. Included in the building are 
classrooms for non-scientific subjects, offices for faculty, a small 
auditorium equipped with visual aids, sound-proof recording 
booths for languages classes, art studios and a small art gallery, 
seminar rooms, a lounge and a kitchenette. 

Hunter Hall, the new science building, is on the west side of 
the campus, located north of Joyner Hall. Here are classrooms 
and laboratories for biology, business, chemistry, economics, 
home economics, mathematics and physics. Adequate space is 
provided for offices and research laboratories for faculty, a sci- 
ence library, a photographic darkroom, and a reception room. A 
greenhouse is used by the Department of Biology for botany 
classes. 

Northwest of Hunter Hall is the Ellen Brewer House which 
provides an opportunity for seniors in the Home Economics De- 
partment in small, rotating groups, under the guidance of an 
instructor, to gain actual experience in home management. 
Erected in 1959, it offers all the modern facilities of a homelike, 
convenient residence, including, in addition to the four bedrooms 
and baths, a study for student use, an office for the supervisor, 
a living room, a dining room, a family room and a kitchen. 

East of the dormitories are the physical education building, the 
campus store, and the post office. 

The Elva Bryan Mclver Amphitheater, with a seating capacity 
of 1,200, was completed in the spring of 1964. Located in an oak 
grove to the south of Jones Hall, it overlooks a four and a half 
acre lake. An island stage separated from the amphitheater by 
a moat is complete with lighting and sound systems, and is 
ideally situated for outdoor performances and general college 
programs. 

LIBRARY 

The library, located on the second and third floors of Johnson 
Hall, offers facilities for study, supplementary and recreational 
reading, and reference work. It contains approximately 48,000 
volumes and a large number of pamphlets. The books are care- 
fully selected by the librarian and the heads of departments to 
meet the needs of the students. The periodical room is supplied 
with the leading literary, scientific, and educational magazines, 
and state and national newspapers. 



20 Meredith College 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

As a distinctly Christian college, Meredith makes every effort 
to encourage the spiritual growth of its students. A Director of 
Religious Activities gives guidance and counsel to students in 
their organized work and in their individual problems. Each 
year, in February, a visiting speaker is invited to the campus to 
lead students in a series of services looking toward deeper 
spiritual thinking and experience. 

All degree candidates are required to attend the chapel exer- 
cises five days each week. Three days are planned for worship 
services and two days for student assemblies. 

HEALTH 

The Delia Dixon Carroll Infirmary, well-equipped and air- 
conditioned, under the direction of two graduate nurses and the 
College physician is maintained for the care of the sick and for 
the teaching of good health habits. Three daily office hours are 
observed by the nurses and emergencies are cared for at any 
hour. The College physician has designated office hours at the 
College at which time students may see him. It is the purpose 
of the physician and nurses to prevent illness by means of knowl- 
edge and observance of the general laws of health. Health rat- 
ings based on a positive health program are recorded annually. 

A student health blank furnished by the College, following 
acceptance of the student, must be completed and mailed di- 
rectly to the Dean, Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. All neces- 
sary ocular and dental work should be attended to before stu- 
dents enter or during vacations. In emergencies this work may 
be done by specialists in Raleigh without loss of time from 
classes. These appointments as well as those with other physi- 
cians and dentists must be made through the College infirmary. 

RESIDENCE 

Students not living at their own homes or with near relatives 
are required to live in the College dormitories. Stringfield Hall 
and a section of Vann Hall are reserved for freshmen. 

Students should bring with them towels, sheets, pillows, 
pillowcases, bedspreads, and all other bed coverings likely to 
be needed. All rooms are furnished with single beds. Curtains, 
draperies, rugs, and pictures will make the room more attractive. 

All laundry must be clearly marked with name tape. The 
laundry fee collected by the College covers the cost of flat work 
only. Each student may have laundered each week two sheets, 
two pillowcases, one bedspread, and one bathmat. 

All dormitories will be closed during the Christmas and Spring 
holidays. 



General Information 21 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government Association. "Each student in coming to 
Meredith College accepts college citizenship involving self- 
government under the honor code." On this concept, so defined 
in Article III, Section 2, of the constitution of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association, all campus government is based. All Mere- 
dith students are thereby members of the Student Government 
Association, the chief purpose of which is the promotion of a 
high sense of honor as the basis of all student government policy. 
Through the effective functioning of the honor code, the Asso- 
ciation seeks to regulate the life of the students for the good 
of all concerned. The leadership of the Association is composed 
of three elected groups: the Legislative, Judicial, and Student 
Activity Boards, and an Executive Committee composed of the 
Student Government president and representatives from each 
board. A Faculty Committee on Student Government confers 
with these boards on major matters of discipline and policy. The 
Student Government Association holds regular meetings at the 
chapel period each Thursday, at which time the students have 
an opportunity to discuss matters of special interest to them. 

Religious Organizations. The religious activities of the students 
are under the general direction of the Meredith Christian Asso- 
ciation, its council including the officers of the Baptist Student 
Union, other auxiliary organizations and a representative of 
students belonging to other churches than a Baptist church. 
Vespers and Family Altar provide worship opportunities on the 
campus. Study groups are held throughout the year for helpful 
thinking and working together. Missionary opportunities are 
provided by the Young Woman's Auxiliary. Enjoyable parties, 
to which students from the neighboring colleges are sometimes 
invited, are also included in the programs of the Association. 
One week each year is set aside as Religious Focus Week, at 
which time Christian leaders from outside the college community 
are invited to direct student thinking in all areas of life. The 
character and number of religious activities fostered on the 
Meredith campus are evidence of the Christian purposefulness 
of Meredith students. 

Honor Society. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor Society, organized 
in 1923, has as its special aim the promotion of scholarship at 
Meredith. Members are admitted on the basis of scholastic 
standing maintained over a period of two years or more. Each 
year Kappa Nu Sigma presents some distinguished speaker, who 
is heard by the entire college community. 

Departmental Clubs. A means of cultural enrichment is offered 
students in the various departmental clubs at Meredith. These 



22 Meredith College 

are the International Relations Club, the Elizabeth Avery Col- 
ton English Club, the Creative Writing Club, the Barber Science 
Club, the Art Club, the French Club, the German Club, La 
Tertulia Spanish Club, the Canaday Mathematics Club, the 
Home Economics Club, the Sociology Club, the Tyner Student 
N.E.A., the Granddaughters' Club, the Hoof Print Club, the 
Monogram Club, the Price Latin Club, the Freeman Religion 
Club, Psi Chi (Psychology) and Tomorrow's Business Women. 
Most of these hold monthly meetings and aim at an approach 
to their subjects somewhat different from the distinctly aca- 
demic. 

Literary Societies. Two societies, the Astrotekton and the 
Philaretian, have been in existence since the early days of the 
College. In addition to the presentation of programs at regular 
meetings, each society offers a medal for the best essay written 
by one of its members during the academic year. 

The Silver Shield. Selection for membership in the Silver 
Shield, honorary leadership society of the College, is based upon 
Christian character, constructive leadership, and service to the 
College. Members are chosen from the senior and junior classes 
at a public "tapping" ceremony. The Silver Shield was organized 
in 1935. 

Publications. There are three student publications at Mere- 
dith: The Twig, a newspaper, issued bi-weekly, in the columns 
of which College happenings are recorded and student opinion 
expressed; The Acorn, a literary journal published four times 
during the College year; and Oak Leaves, the College yearbook. 

The Chorus. The Meredith Chorus, directed by a member of 
the music faculty, appears in concert at stated intervals through- 
out the College year. 

Sigma Alpha Iota. Music majors and candidates for the 
Bachelor of Music degree who meet the scholastic requirements 
and have the approval of the music faculty are eligible for 
membership in Sigma Alpha Iota. This national music fraternity 
for women encourages students by both awards and scholarships. 

The Phi Kappa Chapter of Sigma Pi Alpha was organized at 
Meredith in 1941. Sigma Pi Alpha is a national honorary mod- 
ern language fraternity which seeks to recognize outstanding 
achievement in modern languages and to encourage active in- 
terest in the culture of the nations in which such languages are 
spoken. Students of Spanish, French, and German are selected 
on the basis of achievement and interest. 

The Meredith Playhouse. The Meredith Playhouse provides for 
students who are interested in dramatics both the opportunity to 



General Information 23 

appear in plays and practical experience in play production. 
Several plays are presented during the winter. A chapter of 
Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary dramatic fraternity, gives 
special recognition to members of The Meredith Playhouse who 
excel in its activities. 

The Meredith Recreation Association. The Meredith Recrea- 
tion Association cooperates with the Department of Health and 
Physical Education in planning a wide range of recreational 
activities. Archery, badminton, basketball, bowling, equitation, 
field hockey, golf, Softball, volleyball, and tennis are among the 
activities offered. 

The four classes compete in the presentation of an original 
dramatic production on Stunt Night. 



Expenses 



GENERAL FEES FOR THE YEAR 
Resident Students 

Tuition: instruction, library, lectures and recitals, 

academic administration $750.00 

Residence: room and board, laundry, infirmary 

service, maintenance 680.00 



$1,430.00 
Non-resident Students 

Tuition ( as above ) $750.00 

SPECIAL FEES FOR EACH SEMESTER 

Applied Music (two half -hour lessons a week) : 

Regular Students $50.00 or $60.00 

Part-Time Students and Special Students 100.00 

Use of practice room, witli piano, one hour daily 9.00 

For each additional hour 6.00 

Use of organ, one hour daily 30.00 to 50.00 

Use of practice room, without piano, one hour daily 5.00 

For each additional hour 4.00 

Course fee, for special and part-time students, 

for each credit hour 24.00 

Education 495 or 495S 40.00 

Golf 5.00 

Home Economics 493 or 493S 45.00 

(Additional fee for non-resident students) 
Horseback Riding: 

Full-time Students (two hours a week) 55.00 

Special Students (one lesson a week) 50.00 

Special Students (two lessons a week) 70.00 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Graduation fee, including diploma $10.00 

Gymnasium costume (approximate cost) 12.00 

Late registration 5.00 

Late payment of regular and special fees 5.00 

Change of course 5.00 

Special examination 2.00 

Transcript of academic record (after first copy) 1.00 

X-ray in Infirmary 10.00 

Fluoroscope in Infirmary 5.00 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

For resident students: 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany each application of a new 
student. This fee is not refundable. 

(24) 



General iNFonMAxioN 25 

A room deposit of $25.00 for a student now in college who 
wishes to reserve a room for next session must be paid before 
March 1. This fee will be credited on the account of those stu- 
dents who re-enter. $15.00 will be refunded if the request is re- 
ceived by June 15. 

The balance is payable as follows: 

For new students, on or before April 1 (not 

refundable ) $ 75.00 

Old students on or before June 15 for the en- 
suing session (not refundable) S 50.00 

At the beginning of the First Semester $300.00 

On November 4 the balance of the amount for 
the first semester 

At the beginning of the Second Semester $375.00 

On March 23 the balance of the amount for the 
second semester 

For non-resident students: 

A fee of $10.00 must accompany each application 
of a new student. This fee is not refundable. 

At the beginning of each semester $200.00 

On November 4 the balance of the amount for the 
first semester will be due. On March 23 the bal- 
ance for the second semester will be due. 

The preceding statements as to charges and terms of payment 
are the equivalent of a contract between the College and its 
patrons. Neither the President nor the Business Manager is ex- 
pected to modify those regulations without specific authorization 
from the Board of Trustees. 

In view of the prevailing uncertainty as to cost of labor and 
materials, the College reserves the right to change its fees for 
room and board at the beginning of each semester if conditions 
make it necessary. Patrons will be given advance notice of any 
change to be made. 

A student is not officially registered or entitled to enroll in 
any class until satisfactory financial arrangements have been 
made with the Business Manager. Under no circumstances will 
a student be allowed to take semester examinations or receive 
a transcript of her record until her account has been paid in full. 

A deduction of ten per cent on all charges is allowed for each 
student when two or more come from the same family. 

Members of the junior and senior classes planning to be mis- 
sionaries will receive, on certification by their local churches, 
an allowance of $100 on their expenses for the year. 



26 Meredith College 

Students are not required to make a breakage deposit to cover 
unjustifiable damage to college property, but for such damage 
they will be expected to pay. 

Resident students are not charged for the ordinary services 
of the College physician and nurses, and for the use of the 
infirmary. For additional service in case of serious or prolonged 
illness, for all special medical prescriptions, x-ray, and fiuoro- 
scope, the patron is expected to pay. 

If a student vi^ithdraws or is dismissed from the institution 
before the end of a semester, no refund will be made for the 
half of the semester in which she leaves. Proportionate refund 
may be allowed on residence charges if a student is continuously 
absent for at least four weeks because of illness. 



SCHOLARSHIPS, LOAN FUNDS, SELF-HELP 

Freshman Scholarships. The Board of Trustees authorizes the 
annual award of fifty-five scholarships to resident members of the 
incoming freshman class. Fifteen of these scholarships are valued 
at $450.00 each; forty, at $250.00 each. Awards will be based on 
outstanding scholastic achievement and promise, qualities of 
social leadership, and financial need. A freshman applicant who 
feels qualified and desires to be considered as a scholarship re- 
cipient should address a request directly to President Carlyle 
Campbell, Meredith College. The application and supporting 
credentials should be submitted by February 15. 

Upper-Class Scholarships. Forty scholarships, valued at $250 
each, are awarded to resident members of the sophomore, junior, 
and senior classes on the basis stated above. Applications and 
supporting credentials should be submitted to the Dean by 
May 1. 

Endowed Scholarships. Friends of the College have established 
endowment funds for scholarship aid, the principal of which 
amounts to $41,050. These funds provide for seventeen scholar- 
ships, as indicated below. In some cases the donors have made 
specific restrictions affecting the award of the scholarships, but 
students interested may write the Px'esident of the College. 
Value, $120.00. 

The J. T. J. Battle Scholarships (four) 

The Z. M. Caveness Scholarship 

The Mr. and Mrs. John E. Efird Scholarships (two) 

The Myrtle Hart Farmer Scholarship 

The Hester Farrior Scholarship 

The Fuller B. Hamrick Scholarship 

The Ella G. Holcomb Scholarship 



General Information 27 

The Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Matthews Scholarship 
The Ida Poteat Scholarship 
The Thomas P. Pruitt Memorial Scholarship 
The Emma Barber Towler Scholarships (two) 
The Mollie B. Wyatt Scholarship 

The Helen Price Scholarship. The Kappa Nu Sigma Honor 
Society awards to the freshman who maintains the highest 
scholastic average during her first year in college a scholarship 
valued at $100. The Society reserves the right to withhold or 
to change the value of the award if circumstances require ad- 
justment. 

The Perry-Harris Scholarship. A $250 scholarship given by 
Dr. Julia Hamlet Harris in memory of her mother, Mrs. Ella 
Perry Harris, to a student who has completed one year of study 
at Meredith in the upper fifth of her class. Preference will be 
given to a student majoring or planning to major in English. 

Williams Scholarship Fund. Given by Duvall M. Williams of 
Wilmington, N. C, in memory of his parents, Mrs. Leah Koonce 
Williams and Mr. Robert E. Williams, Sr., this fund is established 
for the purpose of helping and encouraging some deserving 
students to pay their way through college. The students must 
intend to go into joreign missionary work (not in the continental 
U. S. or Canada) in, preferably though not restricted to, Latin 
America. The amount will be determined by the student's need. 

The Ruth Ann Hubhell Creative Writing Award. The interest 
on $500, the gift of Miss Hubbell, an alumna, will be given each 
year to that student whose work submitted in competition for 
the award gives best evidence of ability and sustained interest 
in creative writing. Details may be obtained from the Depart- 
ment of English. 

Lillie Grandy Scholarship Fund. Granted under the will of the 
late Miss Lillie Grandy of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, the 
income from this fund makes available eight $300.00 scholar- 
ships. Applicants must be residents of Camden County or Pas- 
quotank County, North Carolina, and must have completed the 
first year at Meredith College and "have proven to the faculty 
during their freshman year that they have intellectual ability 
and sterling character." These scholarships may be renewed 
during the junior and senior years if in the judgment of the 
faculty the recipients prove themselves worthy. Applications 
should be submitted to the Chairman of the Scholarship Com- 
mittee. 

College Loan Funds. Earnings from the funds listed arc avail- 
able for loan purposes to students in residence. Inquiries sliould 



28 Meredith College 

be addressed to Dr. George Silver, Business Manager and Treas- 
urer, Meredith College. 

The Elizabeth Avery Colton Loan Fund 
' The Louis M. Curtis Loan Fund 
The Dr. and Mrs. O. S. Goodwin Loan Fund 
The Mabel L. Haynes Loan Fund 
The John M. W. Hicks Loan Fund 

The Mr. and Mrs. John Billingsley Ingram Loan Fund 
The Henrietta S. Jarman Loan Fund 
The Edna Tyner Langston Loan Fund 
The Helen Josephine Neal Loan Fund 
The Olive Chapel Loan Fund 
The William H. Reddish Loan Fund 
The Dr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Stanback Loan Fund 
The W. A. Thomas Student Loan Fund 

The Natio7ial Defense Student Loan Program. The National 
Defense Education Act provides for the creation, at American 
Colleges and Universities, of loan funds for which needy students 
may borrow on reasonable terms for the purpose of completing 
their higher education. This act requires that special considera- 
tion be given to students with superior academic backgrounds 
who intend to teach in public elementary or secondary schools 
or those whose academic background indicates superior capacity 
or preparation in science, mathematics, or a modern foreign 
language. Students interested in knowing more about this loan 
program should consult Dr. George Silver, Business Manager 
and Treasurer, Meredith College. 

The Ida Potent Loan Fund. This fund has been provided for 
juniors and seniors through the alumnae of the College. Appli- 
cation blanks will be furnished upon request addressed to Mrs. 
Margaret Morris, Alumnae Secretary, Meredith College. 

Self-Help. Many students needing financial assistance reduce 
their expenses by part-time employment in the dining room, in 
the library and in various offices and academic departments of 
the college. Compensation varies with the character and amount 
of service rendered, but usually ranges from $125 to $250 for 
the year. Initial correspondence may be addressed to the Presi- 
dent or to the Business Manager. Available appointments will 
be made on the basis of apparent ability and need. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1965 

During the summer of 1965 the College will operate a six- 
week term beginning June 7 and ending July 17. Admission to 



General Information 29 

the summer session is on the same basis as in the regular year. 
Graduates of accredited high schools who are planning to enter 
college in September may begin some regular courses here in 
June. Attendance at the summer session will enable a student to 
complete her work in less than the usual time. The maximum 
amount of credit is seven semester hours for the summer session 
(i.e., three hours each for two courses meeting daily and one 
hour of applied music). 

Regular academic courses will be available in several fields 
of instruction, including music. Private lessons may be arranged 
in this field. 

Full information about the summer session may be obtained 
by writing to the Dean of the College. 



Admission 

Students may be admitted to Meredith College as candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts either as members of the 
freshman class or as students with advanced standing from other 
colleges. Before being accepted, candidates must present cre- 
dentials giving satisfactory evidence that in scholarship, health, 
and character they are qualified for the educational program 
and standards maintained in this institution. 

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

Communications with regard to entrance should be addressed 
to the President of the College, who, upon request, will maU an 
application for admission. Applications, with the appropriate 
fee, should be returned to the President. 

Arrangements should be made by the freshman applicant to 
take the Scholastic Aptitude Test and three Achievement Tests 
of the College Entrance Examination Board, details of which 
are given below. Not earlier than the close of the first semester 
for each freshman applicant the Dean will secure from the 
proper school official a certified academic record showing units, 
grades, and rank in graduating class. It is at this time that the 
student applying for advanced standing should request a com- 
plete transcript of her college work be sent to Meredith. 

Each student will be notified concerning her admission as 
promptly as possible after records have been evaluated, usually 
not later than March 30. When an applicant is notified that she 
qualifies academically for admission, she is then sent a medical 
form to be completed by her physician. A dormitory placement 
sheet is sent at that time to all resident students. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN 
Secondary School Work 

For admission to the freshman class, high school graduates 
must offer a minimum of sixteen units of credit accumulated in 
grades nine through twelve. A unit represents a year's study of 
a subject in a secondary school, and is estimated to be equivalent 
to one-fourth of a full year's work. 

Of the sixteen units the following are required: four units in 
English, the completion of the second year of algebra, one unit 
in geometry, and a minimum of two units in at least one foreign 
language. Additional academic units, to total at least thirteen, 
shall be chosen from language, history, social studies, mathe- 
matics and natural science. Three additional units may be 

(30) 



Admission 31 

chosen from the above subjects or from electives approved 
by Meredith College. 

Each student applying for admission from a secondary school 
must rank in the upper half of her graduating class. It is to 
be noted that 89 per cent of the freshmen entering in September 
ranked in the upper quarter of their graduating classes. 

College Board Examinations 

All freshman applicants are to take the following examina- 
tions of the College Entrance Examination Board: the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and three Achievement Tests which must include 
English Composition, a foreign language, and one other subject- 
matter test of the student's choice. Applicants to Meredith are 
urged to complete these tests in either December or January 
of the senior year, and it is recommended that the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test be taken in December and the Achievement Tests 
in January. If the foreign language or the optional subject is 
concluded in the junior year, the student may take the Achieve- 
ment Test in May or July. 

For 1965-66, the three-hour Scholastic Aptitude Test, ad- 
ministered at several centers in each state, will be given during 
the morning and the Achievement Tests during the afternoon 
on the following dates: 

Saturday, December 4, 1965 Saturday, March 5, 1966 

Saturday, January 8, 1966 Saturday, May 7, 1966 

Saturday, July 9, 1966 

The student should write as soon as possible directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N. J., 
and request a Bulletin of Information and descriptive booklets, 
all three publications obtainable without charge. (These publica- 
tions often may be obtained from high school officials.) The 
Bulletin gives detailed information about fees ($4.50 for the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test, $6.75 for the Achievement Tests); the 
cities where the examination centers are located; and the dates 
when applications are to be returned for each date listed above. 
The descriptive booklets, entitled A Description of the College 
Board Scholastic Aptitude Test and A Description of the Col- 
lege Board Achievement Tests, give a brief description of the 
tests and sample test questions. 

Each student considering Meredith should indicate on the 
test application card that she wishes the report of her scores 
sent to Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. 

EARLY DECISION PLAN 

For the unquestionably well-qualified student who definitely 
desires to enter Meredith College there is designed an Early 



32 Meredith College 

Decision Plan. Under this plan the applicant must take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and the English Composition Achieve- 
ment Test before her senior year in high school. If accepted 
under this plan she will then take the foreign language test and 
a third achievement test of her choice in December or January. 
If one of these, either the foreign language or the optional sub- 
ject, is concluded in the junior year, the student may take the 
Achievement Test in May or July. 

She should file application for admission to the College, with 
the appropriate fee, by September 15 of her senior year, re- 
questing in an accompanying letter that her application receive 
an "early decision" and certifying that she is, therefore, apply- 
ing only to Meredith. On the basis of junior year test scores, 
the applicant's three-year high school record, together with a 
notice of courses being pursued in the senior year and reconi- 
mendations from school officials, the admissions officer will 
accept the qualified applicant by October 15 of her senior year. 
Dormitory students will be requested to make an advance pay- 
ment of $75.00 by November 15. This advance payment is not 
refundable. 

If, however, credentials do not justify early acceptance, the 
applicant will be notified in the fall either that her application 
has been rejected or that action on the application will be de- 
ferred until the spring semester. In the latter case students will 
be asked to repeat the Scholastic Aptitude Test and to enroll 
for the Achievement Tests on the December or January testing 
date; and they will, of course, be free to file applications at 
other institutions if they desire. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED STANDING 

A student applying for advanced standing should present the 
following information: (a) an official transcript of her record, 
including a statement of honorable dismissal, from the institu- 
tion last attended; (b) details of the units offered for college 
entrance and the name of the high school from which the en- 
trance units were received; (c) satisfactory scores on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board; (d) satisfactory scores on the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board Achievement Tests in English Composition, and 
a foreign language if the Meredith requirement has not been met. 

Students who have completed two years of college work should 
indicate the major and other subjects which they expect to 
pursue. Students admitted from other colleges with fewer quality 
points than semester hours of credit must make up the deficiency 
at Meredith College. 

When the candidate comes from a college belonging to the 



Admission 33 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, or an association 
of related rank, she will be given credit for the courses acceptable 
toward a degree at Meredith College. 

Candidates from other colleges will be given provisional 
credits which must be validated by success in work undertaken 
at Meredith College, or by examinations. In order to validate 
the provisional credit allowed a student from a non-accredited 
institution, other than by examination, she must make a mini- 
mum of twenty-four semester hours and twenty-four quality 
points during her first two semesters at Meredith. A student 
who fails to reach this standard will have her provisional credits 
reduced in number by the deficiency in hours or quality points. 

The maximum credit accepted from a junior college is sixty- 
two semester hours. Not more than thirty-two semester hours 
will be accredited for the work of either year in a junior college. 

A student transferring to Meredith at the beginning of the 
junior year will be expected to take at Meredith at least twelve 
hours in the department in which she is a major. A student 
transferring at the beginning of the senior year will be ex- 
pected to take at Meredith at least nine hours in the department 
in which she is a major. 

RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student desiring to return to the College after an absence 
of more than a year should apply to the Dean for re-admission. 
Official transcripts of record at all other institutions should be 
submitted, together with a statement of honorable dismissal. 
Such a student will comply with the requirements either of the 
catalogue under which she is re-admitted, or of a subsequent 
catalogue. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Part-time students are understood to be those qualifying for 
a degree who enroll for not more than nine credit hours a 
semester. Such students will meet the entrance requirements 
outlined above. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

1. Students who have authorization for credit at Meredith from 
another college may register for courses with credit. 

2. College graduates who enter for credit to be applied toward 
public school certification requirements may enroll as special 
students. Evidence of such standing should be submitted in 
advance either by an official transcript, or by a covering letter 
from the institution granting the degree. 

3. A student of mature age who gives evidence of a serious pur- 



34 Meredith College 

pose and who is otherwise properly qualified is allowed to 
enter a special course without fulfilling the entrance require- 
ments. All such courses must be approved by the Dean and 
the instructor concerned, but will not receive college credit. 

ORIENTATION-REGISTRATION 

All students, upon arrival in the city, should enroll promptly 
at the office of the Dean of Students. Dormitories will be open 
to receive freshmen and transfer students at 11:00 a.m. on 
Wednesday, September 8. The orientation and registration pro- 
gram beings at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, September 9. Returning 
students should arrive in time to complete their registration by 
3:00 p.m. on Monday, September 13. All students who fail to 
complete registration on the date specified must pay a special 
fee of five dollars. 

All freshmen and all transfer students are expected to take 
part in the special program arranged for the opening week. In- 
cluded in this program will be a physical examination, instruc- 
tion in the use of the library, social activities, language place- 
ment tests, registration, and talks on various phases of college 
life. 



Academic Regulations 



Meredith College confers two degrees, that of Bachelor of Arts 
and that of Bachelor of Music. To be eligible for a degree, a stu- 
dent must meet the academic requirements for the degree and 
must be a person of unquestionably good character.^ 

The requirements for these degrees are based on the general 
principle of a broad distribution of studies among the representa- 
tive fields of human culture and a concentration of studies within 
a special field. The object of distribution is to give the student 
a general view of our cultural heritage and to broaden her out- 
look. The object of concentration is to aid the student in acquir- 
ing comprehensive knowledge and systematic training in a 
particular field of scholarly achievement. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Hours: A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must 
complete at least 120 semester hours of work. Each semester 
hour of credit is supposed to represent for the average student 
three hours of academic work a week, including preparation, 
classes and laboratories. 

Residence: Every candidate for the degree must attend Mere- 
dith College for one full year, with not less than thirty semester 
hours of credit. If she enters from a senior college not approved 
by the Southern Association or by an association of related rank, 
she must attend for at least two years. The last thirty semester 
hours must be taken at Meredith College, except that not more 
than six^ semester hours may be taken at another institution of 
approved standing.^ 

A student who completes the work required by the College for 
the Bachelor's degree will be granted the degree at the end of 
that session. 

Grades: The College requires that all students maintain at 
least an average grade of C in : 

1. All grades of courses offered for graduation. 

2. All grades of courses completed at Meredith. 

3. All grades of courses completed at Meredith in the field of 
concentration. 



' A student may elect to follow the degree requirements listed in any subsequent 
catalogue In force during her period of residence. 
•Sec exception. P. .19. 
■ These exceptions do not apply to senior transfer students. 

(35) 



36 Meredith College 

4. All grades of courses completed at Meredith in the major 
subject. 
■ 5. All grades of courses completed in the senior year. 

I. Prescribed Courses 

To be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, a 
candidate must have completed 52 to 63 hours from the pre- 
scribed courses listed below. These course requirements should 
be met by the end of the junior year. 

Semester 
Hours 

Art or Music. Art 231, 359, 360 or Music 101 and 102 or 226 3-6 

Those majoring in home economics may substitute Art 362. 
Students desiring an elementary education certificate may 
substitute six hours each in art and music: Art 243, 286 and 
Music 233, 286. 

English. English 101-102, English 221-222 12 

Foreign Language 6-12 

High School Units Offered College Requirements 

Two units in one language 12 hrs. in any language. 

Three units in one language 6 or 12 hrs. in thiat language 

depending on the results of 
proficiency tests. 
Two units in each of two 6 hrs. in one of these or 12 

languages hrs. in a third language. 

Four units in one language 6 hrs. in that language de- 
pending on the results of 
proficiency tests. 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences 12-14 

Biology 101-102; Chemistry 101-102; Mathematics 101, 102; 
Physics 221-222. 

Social Studies 12 

History 101-102 and six hours chosen from the following: 
Economics 221, 222; Geography 201, 202, 231, 302; Political 
Science 201, 202; Psychology 221; Sociology 221, 222. Trans- 
fer students entering with six semester hours in European or 
ancient history will have met the requirement in history. 
Majors in Home Economics may substitute Sociology 374 
for Sociology 222. Prospective teachers must select two sub- 
jects other than history. 

Religion. Religion 101, 102 6 

Health Education. Health Education 101 1 

Students transferring to Meredith College as juniors or 
seniors will be excused from this requirement. 

Physical Education 

Only one course in physical education will be required during any 
one semester except for the student who failed a course in physical 
education the previous semester. Students enrolled for Physical Edu- 
cation 386 may substitute this for an activity course for that semester. 



Academic Regulations 37 

Students entering Meredith must successfully complete physical 
education courses according to the following program — unless excused 
by the Dean. 

Those entering as first-year students — three years 
Those entering as second-year students — two years 
Those entering as third-year students — one year 

II. Field of Concentration 

Each student will select a field of concentration consisting of 
at least forty-two semester hours above the freshmen level 
distributed as follows: eighteen to twenty-four semester hours 
in a major subject and twenty-four to eighteen semester hours 
in one or two related subjects, with a minimum of six semester 
hours in a subject. The field of concentration may not include 
any courses open primarily to freshmen. Required courses not 
open primarily to freshmen may count as a part of the field of 
concentration. 

Concentration in a field of study is intended to be more than 
a series of unrelated courses listed in the catalogue under sev- 
eral departments. The work required of each student in a field 
of concentration should be planned by the major department 
as a unified, coherent whole, consisting of closely related courses. 
The requirements of a departmental major in a field of con- 
centration are listed under each department. Without consent 
of the administrative council, a student may not change her 
major subject after becoming a senior. 

Not later than the close of the sophomore year, a candidate 
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts shall select a departmental 
major. When this selection has been approved by the depart- 
ment concerned, the chairman of that department becomes the 
adviser of the student. The program of studies arranged by the 
chairman of the department and the student must receive the 
final approval of the dean. 

The major must be selected from the following list of subjects: 

Art History 

Biology Home Economics 

Business Mathematics 

Chemistry Music 

Economics Psychology and Philosophy 

English Religion 

Foreign Languages — French, Sociology 
Latin, Spanish 

The related subject or subjects may be selected either from 
the above list of major subjects or from the following list of 
subjects: 

Education Physics 

Geography Political Science 

German Speech 

Philosophy 



38 Meredith College 

III. Graduate Record Examinations 

The General Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion will be given on campus to all seniors beginning in 1965-66 
at the college expense. 

Students finishing their work in January will be given the test 
in the fall. Others may elect to take the test in the fall or during 
the second semester. Test dates will be announced in advance. 

Graduate Record subject-matter tests may be arranged by 
individual students at their own expense at regular test centers 
elsewhere. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Music will be granted to students 
who already hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science and meet the requirements as stated on page 73 of the 
catalogue. One additional year of study confined exclusively to 
music will usually be necessary to secure this degree. 

During their course of study, students will be expected to con- 
form to the regulations for seniors, including class attendance 
and scholastic attainment. 

THE FRESHMAN YEAR 

Usually freshmen register for the following courses: English, 
a foreign language, health education, physical education, and 
three courses chosen from history, mathematics, natural sciences, 
and religion. Some variation from this schedule may be neces- 
sary for students planning to major in art, home economics or 
music. 

The sixteen hours normally to be taken each semester should 
be chosen from the following courses: 

Art 101-102 History 101-102 

Biology 101-102 Home Economics 101, 104 

Chemistry 101-102 Latin 101-102; 221-222 

English 101-102 Mathematics 101, 102 

French 101-102; 221-222 Music (See Department) 

German 101-102; 221-222 Religion 101, 102 

Health Education 101 Spanish 101-102; 221-222 

REGULATIONS CONCERNING COURSES 

Registration and Withdrawal. As every student schedule must 
be approved by the Dean, a student may enter or withdraw from 
a course only on his authority. 

A student may be permitted by the Dean to drop a course 
during the first ten days of the semester with no grade recorded. 
Thereafter her record will show either "Withdrew Passing" or 



Academic Regulations 39 

"Withdrew Failing." Attention is called to the fee charged for 
any change of course after registration day. 

Amount of Work. No regular student is permitted to take 
fewer than fourteen semester hours of classwork a week without 
permission of the Dean, except that under the following con- 
ditions students may register for only twelve hours: seniors 
enrolled for the course in supervised teaching; a music major 
with a recital to prepare; a student in poor health or one en- 
gaged in outside work that demands much of her time. 

No student may register for more than sixteen hours if she 
failed to make an average grade above C for the preceding 
semester. 

The maximum number of credit hours allowed during any 
semester for any student taking physical education is eighteen; 
for other students the maximum is nineteen hours. 

Prescribed Courses. Prescribed courses take precedence over 
elective courses in the schedule of work for a semester. 

During her freshmen and sophomore years a student may not 
take concurrently two courses in the same department without 
the permission of the Dean. 

Required courses in English and foreign language must be 
continued each semester they are offered until the requirement 
has been met. 

Restricted Credit jor Juniors and Seniors. Twelve hours of 
credit in courses primarily for freshmen may be taken in the 
junior and senior years, not more than six hours of which may 
be taken during the senior year. 

Credit in Music. A maximum of twenty-four semester hours 
in music may be counted by students not majoring in music as 
elective credits towards the Bachelor of Arts degree. All such 
credit in applied music must be validated by equal credit (with 
a grade of C or better) in courses selected from Theory or History 
and Literature. 

A maximum credit of four semester hours is allowed all stu- 
dents in ensemble courses — chorus or orchestra. This credit need 
not be substantiated by work in theoretical music. 

Maximum Credit in a Subject. The maximum amount of work 
that a student may take in any one subject, other than the 
Department of Music, is forty hours. Students having a major 
in the Department of Music may take a maximum of sixty 
semester hours from the various subdivisions of that department. 

Repeating Courses. A course may be repeated only if the 
student registers for the course the next time it is offered ex- 



40 Meredith College 

cept by permission of the Dean and the chairman of the depart- 
ment in which the course is to be repeated. 

Correspondence Credit. A maximum credit of six semester 
hours may be allowed for correspondence courses ( with a grade 
of C or higher) after written permission has been obtained from 
the Dean. 

Deficiency in English. The Department of English may require 
special work in composition of a student who submits to any 
department a paper containing gross errors in English com- 
position. 

Final Work for a Degree. Not more than six semester hours of 
the last thirty may be taken in another institution of approved 
standing as the final work necessary for graduation, except in 
the case of four-hour courses, in which case eight hours of credit 
will be allowed. Such courses must be approved in advance by 
the Dean. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Students are expected to be regular and prompt in their at- 
tendance at all classes, conferences, and other academic appoint- 
ments. They must accept full responsibility for class presenta- 
tion, announcements, and assignments missed because of 
absence. Absences tend to affect the quality of a student's work 
and, therefore, may lower her standing in courses. 

The following regulations place on the student the responsi- 
bility for determining what constitutes good cause for absence 
from class: 

I. Freshmen and Sophomores 

A. The number of unexcused absences allowed each semester 
will be equal to the number of class meetings per week — not to 
exceed three. This ruling includes absences from classes, private 
lessons in music, and laboratory periods. 

B. Such an allowance of absences will cover all situations 
except excused illness and college representation. 

C. Any unexcused absence beyond the stated limit or any 
unexcused absence at the last class session before or the first 
session after a holiday — if these absences occur within two days 
before or after a holiday — will place the student on attendance 
probation in that course for the remainder of the semester. Any 
unexcused absence by a student on attendance probation will 
result in her being dropped from the course. 

D. Dean's List students will be governed by the class-attend- 
ance policy for juniors and seniors. 



Academic Regulations 41 

II. Juniors and Seniors 

A. Juniors and seniors on the Eligibility List will be granted 
optional class attendance except in the case of the last class 
session before or the first session after a holiday. 

B. Any unexcused absence at the last class session before or 
the first session after a holiday — if these absences occur within 
two days before or after a holiday — will place the student on 
attendance probation in that course for the remainder of the 
semester. Any unexcused absence by a student on attendance 
probation will result in her being dropped from the course. 

C. Juniors and seniors not on the Eligibility List will be 
governed by the class-attendance policy for freshmen and sopho- 
mores. 

III. Right of Appeal 

In exceptional cases an appeal concerning either attendance 
probation or being dropped from a course may be made to the 
Administrative Council. 

IV. Excused Absences 

A. Absences because of illness — in the infirmary, or off campus 
with a statement from a physician, parent or guardian — will be 
excused. For non-resident students such a statement on an 
official form should be filed in the Registrar's office on the day 
the student returns to classes. 

B. A student on the Eligibility List may have as many as three 
additional absences from each course, without penalty, to attend 
meetings of an officially recognized campus organization, to 
represent the College as a whole, or to participate in academic 
off-campus activities if approval for such absences is given in 
advance by the Dean. 

C. Students authorized in advance by the Department of Edu- 
cation to do substitute teaching in the city or county schools 
may be excused from classes on that day. 

V. Class Attendance in Activity Courses in Physical Education 
A student is required to attend during the semester at least 

80 per cent of the class sessions in an activity course in physical 
education in order to receive a passing grade in the course. 
Absences are thus provided for illness — except in the case of 
extended illness. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Each course receives one official semester grade, an evaluation 
of the entire work of the student during the semester. In spite 
of the fact that different disciplines demand different emphases, 



42 Meredith College 

that in certain areas special skills are necessarily involved, and 
that absolute uniformity in such interpretation would be im- 
possible and perhaps undesirable, effort has been made to formu- 
late some statement of interpretation of the letter grades. 

A=Sustained mastery of course content and consistent dem- 
onstration of individual initiative and insight beyond the 
fulfillment of course requirements. 

B=Work displaying accurate knowledge of course content 
and some ability to use this knowledge creatively. 

C=Work demonstrating familiarity with basic course con- 
cepts, related methods of study, and full participation in 
class work. 

D=Work below the minimum standard as defined above. 
Although falling below this minimum, it is considered of 
sufficient merit to be counted toward graduation if bal- 
anced by superior work in other courses. 

F=Failure which may not be made up by re-examination. 

Inc.=That the student's work is incomplete. If an Inc. is not 
completed during the next semester, it automatically be- 
comes an F. 

WF=That the student was not passing when she withdrew 
from the course. 

WP=That the student was passing when she withdrew from 
the course. 

QUALITY POINTS 

The minimum scholastic average of C, or a credit ratio of 1.0, 
required of a candidate for a degree, is determined by the quality 
points to which her course grades entitle her. Each semester 
hour with a grade of A carries three quality points; B, two; 
C, one; D, none. 



ELIGIBILITY LIST 

An Eligibility List is prepared at the beginning of each se- 
mester. The list includes the names of students who have main- 
tained during the previous semester the minimum academic 
standards for College representation or for student activities as 
indicated in the Student Handbook. Requirements for inclusion 
on the list are as follows: 

1. That a student should have been registered for at least 
twelve semester hours of credit; 



Academic Regulations 43 

2. That she should have completed and passed all courses with 
an overall average of C or better; 

3. That her conduct is approved by the Dean of Students. 

DEAN'S LIST 

At the end of each semester there is published a Dean's List 
of students who have attained high scholastic standing. In this 
list are names of students registered for at least twelve hours. 
They should have completed and passed all courses with a num- 
ber of quality points equal to twice the number of semester 
hours taken plus three. 

A student may be removed by the Dean from this list during 
the semester if her conduct or grades are such as to make re- 
moval advisable. 

GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts with distinction is conferred 
upon a student under the following conditions: 

(1) A student must have been in residence at Meredith Col- 
lege at least two years and must have earned a minimum 
of fifty-seven semester hours. 

(2) For the purpose of computing the standing of a student 
all semester hours taken for degree credit at Meredith 
College are counted. 

(3) Those whose average is two and two-tenths quality points 
per semester hour are graduated cum laude; those whose 
average is two and seven-tenths quality points per se- 
mester hour are graduated magna cum, laude; those whose 
average is two and nine-tenths quality points per semester 
hour are graduated sum,ma cum. laude. 

No student shall be graduated with distinction unless her 
grades on all her college work, including any taken at other 
colleges, meet the required standards set up for such honors. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Students are classified at the beginning of each semester. To 
be classified as a sophomore, a student must have at least twenty- 
three semester hours of credit and sixteen quality points; to be 
classified as a junior, at least fifty-six hours of credit and fifty 
quality points; to be classified as a senior, at least eighty-six 
hours of credit and eighty-four quality points. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Final examinations are held in all courses at the end of each 
semester. No credit should be expected for a course if the ex- 



44 Meredith College 

amination is not taken as scheduled, unless another date is 
authorized by the Dean and the instructor concerned. A special 
fee will be charged for individual examinations thus allowed. 

Seniors have examinations at the same time as other students, 
except that seniors who have examinations on the last Thursday 
and Friday of the second semester will take them on the pre- 
ceding Thursday and Friday. 

At the end of each semester a report is sent to the parent or 
guardian of a student, showing her grade of scholarship and ex- 
cessive absences from classes. 

RETENTION OF STUDENTS 

During each semester of her first college year a student must 
pass at least six semester hours. However, in order to continue 
beyond her first college year, a student must have passed a 
minimum of fifteen hours. She must, also, have passed enough 
additional hours, or have accumulated enough quality points, so 
that the total of semester hours and quality points is at least 
twenty-four. 

After the first year in college a student must pass a minimum 
of nine semester hours each semester. Unless she has also ac- 
cumulated nine quality points for the same semester, she will 
be placed on academic probation for the following semester. 
Probationary status will not be permitted for two successive 
semesters. A written notice of such probation will be sent to the 
parents and to the student. 

Before a student is permitted to register for her third college 
year she must have accumulated, during regular and summer 
sessions, a minimum of fifty semester hours and forty-four 
quality points. 

A student who does not meet these minimum requirements 
will be dropped from the College for one semester. She may 
apply for re-admission either by submitting a transcript of work 
completed at another approved institution or in some other 
way demonstrating to the College authorities that she is quali- 
fied to continue at Meredith. Summer school credits, while 
encouraged, will not be considered as the equivalent of one 
full semester of regular college work. 

The College reserves the right to exclude at any time a stu- 
dent whose academic standing or conduct it regards as unde- 
sirable, without the necessity of preferring specific charges 
against her. 

VOCATIONAL PREPARATION 

The College offers certain phases of vocational education on 
the college level and not in competition with the purely pro- 



Academic RECxn-ATioNs 45 

fessional and vocational schools. Students may enter, among 
others, the following fields: 

1. Art 6. Music 

2. Business 7. Religion 

3. Graduate Study 8. Social Welfare 

4. Library Work 9. Teaching 

5. Medicine, Medical a. Elementary 

Technology, Nursing b. Secondary 

The College offers courses of instruction leading to a major 
in Business. This course is not open to jreshmen. This training 
qualifies students to hold positions in the business world. Courses 
in shorthand and typewriting are also available (without credit) 
to prospective librarians, religious and social workers, teachers, 
or other students not majoring in business. 

Students planning to enter professional schools or to do grad- 
uate work after leaving Meredith should secure advance in- 
formation about the requirements which they must satisfy. The 
Dean of the College will be glad to assist the individual student, 
in keeping with the degree requirements of this institution, to 
plan her course of study with these aims in view. 

In the natural sciences, fully accredited pre-professional 
courses are offered for laboratory technicians, nurses, and stu- 
dents of medicine. 

The Department of Religion trains teachers of Bible and per- 
sonnel for association and local church work. 

Because of the increasing demand for various types of trained 
social workers, the curriculum has been expanded to include all 
prerequisites for professional training at accredited schools of 
social work. 

SUMMER SESSION CREDITS 

A student who plans to attend a summer session at another 
accredited college should make application for transfer credit 
through the Dean's office. She will also secure the written ap- 
proval of appropriate heads of departments for courses she plans 
to take. The maximum credit allowed for a summer term is on 
the basis of one semester hour per week. Eligibility status is 
not affected by summer session credits. 

WITHDRAWAL 

Official withdrawal of resident students is made in the office 
of the Dean of Students. Withdrawal of non-resident students 
is made in the office of the Dean of the College. 

Failure to make official withdrawal forfeits the right of honor- 
able dismissal. 



Courses of Instruction 



A course with an odd number is given tile first semester; a course 
with an even number, the second semester. If an S follows the odd 
number, the course is offered in the second semester; if an F follows 
the even number, the course is also offered in the first semester. 

A coui'se with two numbers continues throughout the year. If the 
numbers are connected with a hyphen, no permanent credit is allowed 
until the full year's work is completed. 

Courses are numbered as follows: the 100 courses for freshmen, the 
200 courses for sophomores, the 300 courses for juniors and seniors. 
The 400 courses are for seniors only except by special permission. 

Brackets enclosing the number and title of a course indicate that the 
course is not given for the current year. 

The College does not guarantee to offer any course listed below for 
which there is not a minimum registration of five students. 

A "block" course is taught for the first half of a semester, six days a 
week. Student teaching under supervision is scheduled for the second 
half of either semester. 

ART 

Leonard White, Associate Professor 

Arthur C. Dov^^ns, Assistant Professor 

Diana D. Harmon, Instructor 

Requirements for a major: a total of thirty hours in Art including 
101-102, 221, 222, 359, 360, and 498. 

101-102. BEGINNING DRAWING AND 

COMPOSITION Credit, Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
An introductory course in basic design. Emphasis is placed upon the 
elements and principles of design with particular attention to drawing 
and composition in the fall semester and to the use of color in the 
spring semester. Studio problems involve the use of a variety of ma- 
terials. Through group and individual criticism, the development of 
individual creative ability is encouraged. 

Prerequisite for Art 102: Art 101 or Art 243. 

Credit for Art 101 given upon completion of Art 102, Ed. 

386A or Art 362. Mr. White 

221, 222. CREATIVE DESIGN Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 
A course offering the student an opportunity to develop creativeness 
in two and three-dimensional design and technical ability in the use of 
various materials. Mr. White 

226. CERAMICS Credit, Three Hours 

An introductory course in ceramic processes and material. Projects 

in coil, slab, and wheel methods of construction. Experimentation with 

various types of decoration. 

Not open to freshmen except by special permission. Mr. White 

(46) 



Courses of Instruction 47 

229. ADVANCED DRAWING Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 

Problems in sketching, figure drawing, illustration and perspective 
drawing. Mr. Downs 

231, 231S. ART APPRECIATION Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to satisfy the need of students for a key to the 
enjoyment of art. Through illustrated lectures and class discussions, 
the art of past cultures and modern times is introduced to the student. 
Not open to art majors. Mr. Downs 

243. BEGINNING ART Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

A course in the fundamentals of art for others than art majors. Con- 
sideration of the elements and principles of design and their applica- 
tion in problems involving various art media. Miss Harmon 

258. ELEMENTARY SCULPTURE Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

An introductory course in modeling and construction of three- 
dimensional subjects. Emphasis is placed upon the creative phase of 
sculpturing and upon technical process and techniques. Mr. Downs 

Ed. 286A. METHODS IN THE TEACHING OF ART 

Credit, Three Hours 
(For Elementary School Teachers) 
Two lectures and four studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 101, or Art 243, or permission of the de- 
partment. 

A study of the aims of art in the school and its place in the integral 
program; practice in art problems for the classroom teacher, together 
with the selection and preparation of illustrative material to meet the 
needs of pupils of difTerent grade levels. Miss Harmon 

347, 348. BEGINNING PAINTING Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102 or by special permission. 

A studio cour.se in creative painting in various media including 
casein, watercolor, and oil. Mr. White or Miss Harmon 

359. HISTORY OF ANCIENT ART Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the significant art of the East and West from prehistoric 
times to the Renaissance. Mr. Downs 

360. HISTORY OF MODERN ART Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the principal trends of sculpture, painting and archi- 
tecture from the Renaissance of the present. Mr. Downs 

362. INTERIOR DECORATION Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
A course to familiarize the student with historical and contemporary 
home furnishing and decoration. Studio problems and interior design. 

Miss Harmon 



48 Meredith College 

Ed. 386A. METHODS IN THE TEACHING OF ART 

Credit, Three Hours 
(For Art Majors) 

Two lectures and four studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite: 12 hours of Art. 

A study of the aims of art in the school and its place in the integral 

program; practice in art problems for the classroom teacher, together 

with the selection and preparation of illustrative material to meet 

the needs of pupils of different grade levels. Miss Harmon 

453, 454. ADVANCED PAINTING Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 
Prerequisite: Art 347, 348. Mr. White 

465. COMMERCIAL ART Credit, Three Hours 

Six studio hours a week. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102. 

A course for the student interested in the nature and application of 

art materials for the commercial art field. Illustration, fashion drawing, 

window display, and advertising art are among the projects covered. 

Miss Harmon 

491. STUDIO PROBLEMS Credit, Three Hours 

A course designed to permit advanced practice and research by art 
majors in their fields of special interest. Painting, sculpture, design, 
interior decoration, or materials and methods of teaching art are sug- 
gested fields of study. These courses must be scheduled by special ar- 
rangement with the department head. Mr. White 

498. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

A study and review group meeting with the staff to consider cur- 
rent problems, advanced techniques, and other problems related to art. 
Required of all art majors in their senior year. Preparation for the 
exhibition required of all senior majors is made in this class. 

Mr. White 
BIOLOGY 

John A. Yarbrough, Professor 

James H. Eads, Assistant Professor 

Helen P. Kelman, Part-time Instructor 

Requirements for a major: twenty-seven semester hours, including 
Biology 101-102, 221, 222, 255, 351 and 364. Other requirements include 
Chemistry 101-102, 221, Mathematics 101, 102 or their equivalent. Ed. 
385 Sc. does not count toward the major. 

101-102. GENERAL BIOLOGY Credit, Six hours 

Two lectures, one conference and two laboratory hours a 
week. 
A course presenting the most important biological facts and prin- 
ciples, and so relating them that the student can apply them to the 
ordinary affairs of life. A study of protoplasm, the cell, the role of 
green plants, including simple experiments in plant physiology, the 
adjustment of organisms to their environment, and the structure and 
functions of vertebrates with special reference to man constitutes the 
work of the first semester. During the second semester a study of 
typical animal and plant forms is made as an introduction to these two 
kingdoms. Staff 



Courses of Instruction 49 

221. GENERAL BOTANY Credit. Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six lab- 
oratory or field-trip hours a week. 

A study of the morphological and physiological aspects of the seed 
plants followed by a survey of the major groups of the plant kingdom. 

Mr. Yarbrough 

222. GENERAL ZOOLOGY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six lab- 
oratory hours a week. 
A phylogenetic survey of the entire animal kingdom with weighted 
emphasis on invertebrates. Both type animals and transitional forms 
are studied as to life history, morphology, physiology and economic 
importance. Mr. Eads 

255. GENETICS Credit, Three or Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102 or its equivalent. 
Three lectures a week and one two hour laboratory (op- 
tional). 
Designed chiefly for a thorough presentation of modern genetic 
principles and with examples from plant and animal breeding. At- 
tempts are also made to apply such information in sociological and 
psychological considerations and in human well-being. The laboratory 
includes the actual experimental breeding of the fruit fly and the 
interpretation of data which demonstrates the classical, quantitative, 
and biochemical theories of genetics. 

[351. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE 

ANATOMY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102; Biology 222 recommended. 

Two lectures and six laboratory hours a week. 

A course dealing with the morphology, anatomy, and development of 

the various vertebrate organs and systems of organs. Various vertebrate 

types, including fish, amphibia, and mammals to be dissected in the 

laboratory. 

Alternates with 353 Mr. Eads 

353. VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102, Chemistry 101-102. Especially 
adapted to students preparing to study medicine or nursing, 
or to become technicians. Three lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory a week. 
Anatomy to be studied only so far as it is necessary to understand the 
functions of the dilTerent systems of the body. Laboratory work to in- 
clude study of muscles and nervous systems of other animals, and 
simple experiments. Mr. Eads 

Alternates with 351. 

[354. HISTOLOGY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102. Espe- 
cially adapted to students preparing to study medicine or 
nursing, or to become technicians. One lecture and six 
laboratory hours a week. 
The first half of the course is devoted to slide preparation, employ- 
ing plant and animal tissues. The paraffin method is emphasized, with 
some attention to the celloidin and freezing techniques. The second 



50 Meredith College 

half consists of a careful microscopic analysis of the common animal 
tissues. 

Alternates with 356. Mr. Yarbrough 

356. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. Two lectures and six labora- 
tory hours a week. 

Laboratory study of maturation, fertilization, segmentation, formation 
of germ layers, origin of characteristic vertebrate organs in represent- 
ative forms. Special emphasis placed on the chick and pig in labora- 
tory, and outside readings to show comparative stages in other verte- 

Alternates with 354. Mr. Eads 

[359. PLANT ANATOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102 and 221. One lecture and six 
laboratory hours a week. 

A study of cellular units of seed plants, including both woody and 
herbaceous types. Mr. Yarbrough 

364. MICROBIOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

Recommended for home economics majors. 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102 or 
their equivalents. One lecture and six laboratory hours a 
week. 

A general study of bacteria, yeasts, and molds, with emphasis on the 
application of the principles of bacteriology to everyday life. Lab- 
oratory work to include culture and staining techniques; principles of 
sterilization and disinfection; bacteriological examination of air, water, 
and milk, and experiments on fermentation. Mr. Yarbrough 

[366. PLANT TAXONOMY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. One lecture and six lab- 
oratory or field-trip hours a week. 
A study of the external morphology, identification, classification, and 
distribution of the seed plants in the vicinity. Mr. Yarbrough 

[Ed. 385 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit Three Hours] 
See page 55. Miss Yarbrough and Mr. Yarbrough 



BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Lois Frazier, Processor 

Evelyn P. Simmons, Instructor 

Ruth B. Robinson, Instructor 

The Department of Business and Economics offers a major in busi- 
ness and a major in economics. Students have a choice of counting 
certain designated courses for credit as either business or economics. 

Courses in this department are not open to freshmen. 



Courses of Instruction 51 

BUSINESS 

Requirements for a major in business: 24 hours exclusive of 231-232. 
The following courses are required: 353-354, 361, 362, 363, 473, and 
483. Business majors must take nine hours of economics, including 221 
and 222. 

In addition to these course requirements, each business major is 
expected to present evidence of having completed forty hours of ap- 
proved, paid work experience. 

Credit for Business 231-232 and 353-354 is restricted to business 
majors. 

231-232. TYPEWRITING Credit, Six Hovirs 

Development of typewriting skill and application to business letters, 
manuscripts, tabulation problems, and office forms. A rate of 50 words 
a minute is required. Students with previous tjTjewriting instruction 
may, upon request, take a placement test. If the results of this test 
indicate sufficient speed, accuracy, and production ability acceptable 
for second semester work, such students may be granted permission 
to enter Business 232. Mrs. Robinson 

353-354. ELEMENTARY SHORTHAND Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite or parallel: Business 231-232. 

Principles of Gregg Shorthand; development of skill to take dictation 

at 80 words a minute for five minutes on new material and produce 

acceptable transcripts. Mrs. Robinson 

361, 362. ACCOUNTING Credit, Six Hours 

Accounting for proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; clas- 
sification of accounts; analysis of financial statements; payroll and tax 
problems. Miss Frazier 

363. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION AND 

REPORTS Credit, Three Hours 

Effective written and oral communication in business; composition of 

adjustment, credit, collection, and sales letters; preparation of business 

reports. Miss Frazier 

375, 376. PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the history, policies, and methods of retail distribution; 

organization; store operation; control practices; personnel management; 

merchandising; advertising; and sales promotion. Miss Frazier 

377. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 

Fundamentals of statistics, covering sources, collection, analysis, and 

interpretation of data; probability and statistical inference; index 

numbers; time-series analysis; correlation techniques. Mrs. Simmons 

381. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to legal principles applied to contracts, negotiable 
instruments, bailments, sales, property, insurance, torts, and bank- 
ruptcy. Miss Frazier 

473, 474. ADVANCED SHORTHAND Credit. Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Business 353-354 or the equivalent. 
Review of shorthand theory, further development of dictation and 
transcription skill; special attention to mailable transcripts. 

Mrs. Robinson 



52 Meredith College 

483,484 OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND 

PRACTICE Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Business 231-232. 
Principles of management applied to offices. Filing and records man- 
agement; operation of transcribing machines, duplicating machines, 
adding machines, and calculators; office organization; personnel rela- 
tions; automation; and selection and proper use of office supplies and 
equipment. Miss Frazier 

(Block Course) 

Ed. 386 B. THE TEACHING OF BUSINESS Credit, Three Hours 
See page 57. 

492. WORK EXPERIENCE Credit, Three Hours 

Supervised experience in business offices two or three afternoons 
weekly. Conferences and remedial program for correction of de- 
ficiencies. For senior majors in business. Miss Frazier 



ECONOMICS 

Requirements for a major in economics: 24 hours in economics, in- 
cluding 221 and 222. Economics 221 is a prerequisite to all other courses 
in economics. 

221 and 221S. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the macroeconomic principles underlying the current 
American economic system, including organization for production, 
distribution of income, business cycles, national income determination, 
and monetary and fiscal policies. Mrs. Simmons 

222. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

A continuation of 221, with microeconomic emphasis to include an 
examination of the market, prices, costs, the production process, forms 
of competition in the theory of the firm, international trade, and 
economic growth. Mrs. Simmons 

355. ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the management of personal and family finances, con- 
sumer buying practices, tax problems, purchasing guides and protec- 
tions, and selling techniques (Offered even-numbered years only.) 

Mrs. Simmons 

365. LABOR ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 222. 

An analysis of American labor in a changing economic and social 

order; special emphasis upon trends in employment, labor organization, 

and standards in relation to technological change, state and federal 

labor legislation. (Offered odd-numbered years only) Mrs. Simmons 

366. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the development of international economic policies: geo- 
graphic, economic, social, and political factors underlying contem- 
porary international problems; foreign exchange and money flows; 
economic competition; and the economic and political methods em- 
ployed by the leading commercial nations. (Offered odd-numbered 
years only.) Mrs. Sinunons 



Courses of Instruction 53 

368. PUBLIC FINANCE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 222. 
A study of the sources of revenue and the principles and methods of 
taxation and financial administration; fiscal policy; debt management; 
and the principles governing expenditures. (Offered even-numbered 
years only.) Mrs. Simmons 

375 PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTION Credit, Three Hours 

(For description see Business 375. 
May count for business or economics.) 

377. STATISTICS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 
(For description see Business 377. 
May count for business or economics.) 

381. BUSINESS LAW Credit, Three Hours 

(For description see Business 381. 
May count for business or economics.) 

385. MONEY AND BANKING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 222. 
An examination of the value and purchasing power of money; the 
role of commercial banks; the central banking system and its monetary 
controls; and the relationship between prices, production, employment, 
and economic growth. Special attention paid to current problems. 

Mrs. Simmons 

388. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Credit, Three Hours 

A critical analysis of the development of economic ideas, their 
origins and institutional framework, with primary emphasis on an 
interpretative study of outstanding economists of the past whose con- 
tributions have significance for contemporary economic theory. 

Mrs. Simmons 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough, Projessor 
Helen Jo Collins, Assistant Professor 

Requirements for a major in Chemistry: twenty-four semester hours 
from courses in Chemistry exclusive of 101-102 and Ed. 385 Sc. or 386 
Sc. 

CHEMISTRY 

101-102. GENERAL CHEMISTRY Credit, Six Hours 

An introductory course in chemistry including qualitative 
analysis. Two class hours and three laboratory hours a week. 

Staff 

221,222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four or Eight Hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. Three class hours and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 



54 Meredith College 

351-352. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Credit, Eight Hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. Two class hours and two 
three-hour laboratory periods a week. Mrs. Collins 

354. BIOCHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 221. Three class hours and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Miss Yarbrough 

356. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 221. 222. Three class hours and one 
three-hour laboratory period a year. Miss Yarbrough 

[Ed. 385 Sc. or 386 Sc. THE TEACHING OF 

SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours] 

See page 58. Miss Yarbrough and Mr. Yarbrough 

491. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 351-352. Three class hours and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Mrs. Collins 

[494. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Credit, Four Hours] 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 221, 222; Chemistry 351, 352; 
Physics 221-222; Mathematics 232, 351. Two class hours and 
two three-hour laboratory periods a week. JVIrs. Collins 

498. SEMINAR Credit, One Hour 

Open only to majors in Chemistry. 



PHYSICS 

221-222. GENERAL PHYSICS Credit, Eight Hours 

Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory period a 
week. Miss Yarbrough 

[354 HOUSEHOLD PHYSICS Credit, Three Hours] 

Two class hours and one three-hour laboratory period a 
week. Miss Yarbrougli 



EDUCATION 

David R. Reveley, Professor 

Harry K. Dorsett, Associate Professor 

Lila Bell, Associate Professor 

Robert G. Fracker, Instructor 

All of the courses listed lierein are designed primarily to prepare 
students who wish to teach in the public schools of the State. Students 
intending to teach should confer with the Department of Education in 
their freshman or sophomore year and so plan their program of work as 
to be sure that they will meet the requirements for the State Class A 
certificate. All teaching programs must be approved by the head of the 
Department of Education. 

Mathematics is noio required of all obtaining new certificates. 



Courses of Instruction 55 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 
Students who expect to secure Class A certificates to teach in either 
the primary or the grammar grade level must meet the requirements 
listed below. 

I. Subject-Matter Courses 

Semester Hours 

Children's Literature^ 2 

American History 6 

Geography 201 and 202 6 

Political Science 2-3 

Art 6 

Music2 6 

Health Education 1-2 

Health Education Methods^ 2 

Physical Education Methods 2 

II. Proiessional Courses 
Area I — The Pupil 

Education 231 and 353 6 

Area II — The School 

Education 357 and a choice of 465, 

491, 492 6 

Area III — Teaching and Practicum 
Education 467 (4 hrs.) 

and 495 or 495S (6 hrs.) 10 



HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

Students who expect to secure State Class A certificates to teach in 
high school, must meet the requirements listed below. It is recom- 
mended that students be able to teach at least two subjects in the high 
school. Majors, related subjects, and electives may be used to this end, 
but it should be noted that the requirements for state certificates and 
the college req^iirements for majors do not always coincide. All teach- 
ing programs must be approved by the head of the Department of 
Education by the beginning of the junior year. 

Mathematics is now required of all obtaining new certificates. 

I. Subject-Matter Courses 

A major and related courses should be selected from the following 
fields (the number of semester hours required for a certificate is indi- 
cated in parenthesis) : 

Art (36), business education (36), English (36), French (30)>, Ger- 
man (30)', home economics (including certain sciences and other re- 
lated courses) — (48), mathematics (30), public school music (includ- 
ing six semester hours in voice) — (48), science (48), social studies; 
economics, history, sociology (42), Spanish (30)i. 

' The state Department of Public Instruction counts Children's Lltcrnture as EnK- 
llsh, not (IB Education. 

" Students who completed Music Theory 101-102 should add Ed. 38.') M. 

• The State Deportment recommends Biology 101-102 as a prerequisite. 

' The hours required in any foreign languayo are based upon two units of high 
■chool work in that language. 



56 Meredith College 

The following combinations are suggested: English-Latin, English- 
French-German, or Spanish, English-religion, history-mathematics, 
history-French-German, or Spanish, science-mathematics. 

11. Professional Courses 
Area I — The Pupil 

Education 231 and 456 6 semester hours 

Area II — The School 

Education 352 and choice of 465, 

491, 492 6 semester hours 

Area III — Teaching and Practicum 

Education 385 or 386, and 495 or 495S.... 9 semester hours 
Note: Students are advised to take these courses in the fol- 
lowing order: Education 231, 352, 385 or 386, 495. 



EDUCATION COURSES 

Education 231 is prerequisite to all Education courses except 342. 

231. 231S. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An intensive study of the psychology of learning. A course intended 

to be basic to the others in the various sequences which give direction 

to the professionally trained teacher. Mr. Reveley Mr. Fracker 

342F or 342. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

An intensive historical review of children's literature, both American 
and European. Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

352F or 352. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 357. 
The historical development, and a consideration of the place and 
fxmction of secondary education in our democracy; the organization and 
administration of the high school curriculum; methods of planning 
and teaching; qualifications of the high school teacher; student guid- 
ance; records and reports. 

Prerequisite to student teaching on the high school level. 

Mr. Dorsett Mr. Fracker 

353 or 353S. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite Ed. 231 or Psychology 221. 
A survey of the psychological development of the individual through 
childhood. Mr. Dorsett 

357, 357S. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Not open to students who take Ed. 352. 
The historical development of the elementary school; qualifications 
of the elementary teacher; the curriculum and co-curricular activities; 
organization and control; relation of teachers and pupils to one an- 
other; records and reports. Miss Bell 
[BLOCK COURSE] 



Courses of Instruction 57 

456F, 456. MEASURING AND GUIDING 

ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR Credit, Three Hours 

A consideration of child and adolescent intelligence, aptitude, 
achievement, interest and personality tests used in the public schools, 
together with elementary statistical techniques involved in their ap- 
plication. Mr. Dorsett 
[BLOCK COURSE] 

465. FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 

The movements of educational thought and institutions which gave 
rise to the American school systems. Mr. Reveley 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

467, 467S. ELEMENTARY METHODS Credit, Four Hours 

A study of materials and methods of teaching in all subjects at the 
elementary school level. Directed observation; units of work developed 
and evaluated. Miss Bell 

[BLOCK COURSE] 

491. SOCIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
Present-day confusion in education due to conflicting philosophies as 

to aims and objectives, curriculum content, methods of learning and 
teaching, and the range of formal education. The responsibility of the 
school in relation to guidance vocational interests, moral and char- 
acter education, family life, and religion. Mr. Reveley 

492. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Credit, Three Hours 
A study of the philosophical bases of modern education, with par- 
ticular reference to the philosophies of idealism, realism, and prag- 
matism. Mr. Reveley Mr. Fracker 
[BLOCK COURSE] 



SPECIAL METHODS COURSES 

Three semester hours of special methods in the field in which one 
is planning to teach are expected for a high school certificate; six 
semester hours may be taken by those who wish a certificate to teach 
in two fields. In special methods courses students are introduced to 
aims, objectives, materials, and techniques of the teaching fields and 
levels of the State Course of Study. Lesson planning, practical dem- 
onstration, and actual observation of teaching of the various phases 
of the programs in the Raleigh City Schools and Wake County consti- 
tute a part of the courses. 

Prerequisite to all special methods courses: Education 231. 

286A. THE TEACHING OF ART Credit, Three Hours 

(For Elementary School Teachers) Miss Harmon 

286 Mus. THE TEACHING OF MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

(For Elementary School Teachers) Miss Haeseler 

386A. THE TEACHING OF ART Credit, Three Hours 

(For description, see page 48) Miss Harmon 

386B. THE TEACHING OF BUSINESS Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Frazier 



58 Meredith College 

385E. THE TEACfflNG OF ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Rose 
386 M.L. THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN 

LANGUAGES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

385 H.Ed., 385S H.Ed. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH 

EDUCATION (Elementary) Credit Two Hours 

Mrs. Hood 

386 H.Ed. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH 

EDUCATION (Secondary) Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Hood 
386. H. Ec. THE TEACHING OF HOME 

ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Hanyen 

385M. THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Preston 

385, 386 Mus. THE TEACHING OF MUSIC Credit, Three or Six Hours 
Prerequisite: Theory 102. Required of juniors majoring in 
Public School Music. (For description see page 73) 

Miss Haeseler 
386F, P. Ed. 386 P. Ed. THE TEACHING OF 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Credit, Two Hours 

Mrs. Massey 

385 Sc. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Yarbrough and Mr. Yarbrough 

386 S.St. THE TEACHING OF HISTORY AND 

SOCIAL STUDIES Credit, Three Hours 

Open to juniors and seniors taking a major in economics, 
history or sociology. Miss Barrington 

OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING 

495, 495S. STUDENT TEACHING Credit, Six Hours (either semester) 
The purpose of this course is to give the student actual teaching ex- 
perience. All student-teaching is on the block. Student-teachers will 
take advanced courses in education for the first nine weeks of the se- 
mester; during the last eight weeks they will be in the classroom for 
the entire day. The student will not take courses other than her courses 
in education during her semester of student-teaching. All high school 
student-teachers must have taken Education 231, Education 352, and 
Education 385 or 386 before the semester in which they do their student- 
teaching. All elementary student-teachers must have taken Education 
231, Education 357, and Education 353 before the semester in which 
they do their student-teaching. The Department reserves the right to 
withhold the privilege of student-teaching if circumstances warrant. 
(Fee $40) Staff 



Courses of Instruction 59 

ENGLISH 

Mary Lynch Johnson, Professor 

Norma Rose, Professor 

lone Kemp Knight, Associate Professor 

Mamie Hafner, Assistant Professor 
Dorothy Pope Greenwood, Instructor 
Ruth Ann Baker, Instructor^ 
Nancy Hill Snow, Instructor- 
Elizabeth S. Chamberlain, Part-time Instructor 

English 101-102 prerequisite for English 221-222; English 221-222 
prerequisite for all other courses in English except 233, 358 and Speech 
221, 226. 

Requirements for a major: Thirty hours in English including English 
101-102; English 221-222; twelve hours from English 351, 352, 353, 354, 
355, 494, 498; and six additional hours from English courses numbered 
above 300. No credit in the Department of English given for Education 
385 E. History 340 (English history) recommended to English majors. 

101-102, lOlS. PRINCIPLES OF WRITING Credit, Six Hours^ 

Staff 
Correct and clear sentence structure and logical organization of sub- 
ject matter emphasized in 101 and continued in 102, together with the 
writing of a research paper. The literature studied in connection with 
the writing chosen both semesters from English writers of the niae- 
teenth century. 

221-222, 221S. DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH 

LITERATURE Credit, Six Hours 

Staff 
A survey of English literature from its beginning through the 
eighteenth century. 

233. CREATIVE WRITING Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Greenwood 

351. OLD ENGLISH Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Johnson 

352. CHAUCER Credit, Three Hours 

Prequisite: English 351. 
A study of Chaucer's poetry with a few selections from other Middle 

English writers. Miss Johnson 

353. 354. SHAKESPEARE Credit, Three or Six Hours 
A study of the English history plays and the "sunny comedies" (353) ; 

the tragedies, the "dark comedies," and the late romances (354). Sup- 
plementary reading in non-dramatic works of Shakespeare and a few 
major pieces of criticism. Miss Rose 

355. MILTON Credit, Three Hours 

A study of Milton's poetry, with selections from his prose writings. 

Miss Johnson 

> Second Semester 
• First Semester 

•During the fall semester one section will meet Ave times n week with three hours 
credit, to take care of the needs o( students deficient in fundamentals. 



60 



Meredith College 



357. AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE 

NINETEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

A study of romantic and early realistic literature of the nineteenth 

century with emphasis on the writings of major authors and selections 

from writings of others. Miss Hafner 



358. 



ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND 
COMPOSITION 



Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Knight 
362. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE VICTORIAN 

PERIOD Credit, Three Hours 

A study of Browning and Tennyson, with selections from Elizabeth 

Barrett Browning, Arnold, and Clough. Miss Johnson 

364. ENGLISH AND AMERICAN POETRY OF THE 

TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours 

Yeats, Eliot, and Frost to Jarrell and Robert Lowell, with each stu- 
dent concentrating upon a poet of her choice. Mrs. Greenwood 

365. ENGLISH POETRY OF THE 

ROMANTIC PERIOD Credit, Three Hours 

A study of Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats, with selections from 

other poets of the Romantic Period. Miss Knight 

368. ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hovu-s 

A study of major works of Swift, Pope, Boswell and Johnson with 

additional reading from other authors illustrating the age and significant 

literary forms. Miss Rose 

[370. ENGLISH AND AMERICAN PROSE OF 

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

Drama from Shaw to Miller and Albee; fiction from Joyce and Vir- 
ginia Woolf to contemporary novelists. Mrs. Greenwood 

Ed. 385 E. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH 

(See page 58.) 
[BLOCK COURSE] 

494. 



Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Rose 



THE TREATMENT OF LITERARY 
PROBLEMS 
Open only to majors in English 

498. SEMINAR 

Open only to majors in English. 



Credit, One Hour 
Miss Rose 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Johnson 



SPEECH 
221. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 

226. ORAL INTERPRETATION 

[351. RELIGIOUS DRAMA 

352. PLAY PRODUCTION 



Credit, Three Hours 
Mrs. Snow 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Baker 

Credit, Three Hours] 
Miss Baker 

Credit, Three Hours 
Miss Baker 



Courses of Instruction 61 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Quentin Oliver McAllister, Professor 

Susanne H. Freund, Associate Professor 

Mary Eleanor Krummel, Assistant Professor 

William R. Ledford, Assistant Professor 

P. A. Cline, Jr., Instructor 

Jacqueline B. Beza, Instructor 

Courses numbered 101-102 and 221-222, or their equivalent, are pre- 
requisite for any course of higher number. 

Requirements for a major in French, Latin or Spanish: Twenty-four 
hours above 101-102, or eighteen hours above 221-222, including 351- 
352. Majors in French or Spanish must include 357 and 358. Majors in 
Spanish must also include 353-354. Latin majors are required to take 
a course in Ancient History. Foreign Language majors are urged to 
include a second foreign language as a related field. 

In order to comply with new certification requirements, students who 
plan to teach French or Spanish must take the courses numbered 357 
and 358 in the language to be taught. Ed. 386 ML is required of stu- 
dents planning to teach a foreign language, and counts as Education. 

FRENCH 
101-102. ELEMENTARY FRENCH Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the French language through analysis, contact, and 
use. Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Credit, Six Hours 

Review of French grammar; introduction of more difficult aspects of 

the language; readings of appropriate difficulty; practice in the oral 

and aural skills. Staff 

351-352. FRENCH LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

A survey of the development of French literature and the main cur- 
rents of French thought from the beginnings to the contemporary 
period. Mr. McAllister 

[353. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

A literary study of the representatives of French classicism in re- 
ligious thought, philosophy, and drama, with some reference to their 
importance in tiie development of continental European civilization. 

Mrs. Freund 

[354. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Credit, Three Hours] 

The period of tlic decline of absolutism, the rise of the bourgeoisie, 

and the development of the rational spirit as shown in the literature 

of eighteenth-century France. Mrs. Freund 

355. FRENCH ROMANTICISM Credit. Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

356. FRENCH REALISM AND NATURALISM Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

357. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors in French. Sophomores admitted by permission 

only. Mr. McAllister 



62 Meredith College 

358. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors in French. Sophomores admitted by permission 

only. Mr. McAllister 

[361. MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE 

1880-1919 Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAllister 

[362. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE 

1919 TO THE PRESENT Credit, Three Hours] 

Mr. McAllister 

492. PROBLEMS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Credit, 1-2 Hours 

Mr. McAllister 

493. DEVELOPMENT AND STRUCTURE OF THE 

FRENCH LANGUAGE Credit, Three Hours 

A survey of the historical development of French from Latin. Read- 
ing of works in Old French. Some introduction, through French, to the 
general field of linguistics. 

Offered only when the demand is sufficient. Mr. McAllister 



GERMAN 

101-102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the German language through analysis, contact, and 

use. Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Mrs. Freund 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Credit, Six Hours 

Review of German grammar; introduction of more difficult aspects 

of the language; readings of appropriate difficulty; practice in the oral 

and aural skills. 

German 358 may be substituted for German 222. Mrs. Freund 

351-352. GERMAN LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the development of German Literature from the begin- 
nings to the contemporary period. Extensive and intensive reading of 
significant works. Lectures and reports in German. 

Offered only when the demand is sufficient. Mrs. Freund 

353, 354. FAUST; LYRIC POETRY OF THE 

19TH CENTURY Credit, One Hour Each Semester 

IVIrs. Freimd 

358. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN Credit, Three Hours 

Designed to meet the needs of students who are interested especially 

in scientific work. Offered only upon demand. Mrs. Freund 



LATIN 

101-102. ELEMENTARY LATIN Credit, Six Hours 

A course for beginners entailing the fundamentals of the language. 

Open to students who offer less than two imits for entrance. Mc. Cline 



Courses of Instruction 63 

221-222. VERGIL'S AENEID Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Two units of Latin for entrance or Latin 101- 

102. 

An intermediate course in Latin designed to prepare the student for 

work witli tiie more difficult authors. Primary considerations will be 

translation of the Aeneid and applied grammar and syntax. Mr. Cline 

351-352. ROMAN LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Four units of Latin and a satisfactory score at 
entrance, or Latin 221-222. 
A survey of Latin literature and civilization with emphasis on repre- 
sentative writers. Translation of the prose of Livy, Pliny, the poetry of 
Horace. Mr. Cline 

[363, 364. ROMAN COMEDY AND 

SATIRE Credit, Three or Six Hours] 

Prerequisite: Latin 351-352. 
Translation of the plays of Plautus and Terence and the satires of 
Juvenal and Horace. Mr. Cline 

365, 366. ROMAN HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL 

WORKS Credit, Three or Six Hours 

Prerequisite: Latin 351-352. 
Translation of selections from Tacitus, Cicero, Suetonius. Mr. Cline 



SPANISH 

101-102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH Credit, Six Hours 

Introduction to the Spanish language through analysis, contact, and 

use. Grammar, graded readings, and oral emphasis. Staff 

221-222. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Credit, Six Hours 

Review of Spanish grammar; introduction of more difficult aspects 

of the language; readings of appropriate difficulty; practice in the oral 

and aural skills. Staff 

351-352. SPANISH LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

A study of the more important works of Spanish literature, par- 
ticularly as they reflect Spanish life and culture. 

Alternates with Spanish 353-354. Miss Krummel 

[353-354. SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours] 

A study of representative works of Spanish-American literature, 
particularly as they reflect the history and civilization of the nations 
concerned. 

Alternates with Spanish 351-352. Mr. Ledford 

357. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION Credit. Three Hours 

Required of majors in Spanish. Sophomores admitted by permission 

only. Mr. Ledford 



64 Meredith College 

358. PHONETICS AND CONVERSATION Credit, Three Hours 

Required of majors in Spanish. Sophomores admitted by per- 
mission only. Mr. Ledford 

491. CERVANTES AND THE GOLDEN AGE 

OF SPAIN Credit, Three Hours 

Open to juniors by special permission. Mr. Ledford 

[492. MODERN SPANISH DRAMA Credit, Three Hours] 

Open to seniors, and to others by special permission. 
Alternates with Spanish 494. Mr. Ledford 

494. MODERN SPANISH NOVEL Credit, Three Hours 

The modern Spanish novel, beginning with Fernan Caballero. Open 
to seniors, and to others by special permission. 

Alternates with Spanish 492. Mr. Ledford 

Ed. 386 M.L. THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN 

LANGUAGES Credit, Three Hours 

(See page 58.) Mr. McAllister 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Jay D. Massey, Assistant Professor 

Helena W. Allen, Instructor 

Mary Mackay Edwards, Assistant in Equitation 

Virginia J. Hood, Instructor 

Frances W. Stevens, Part-time Instructor 

The program of the Department of Health and Physical Education 
is designed to meet the needs of each individual student with respect 
to such problems as: 

1. The development and maintenance of a high degree of physical 
efiSciency through a varied program of sports, rhythmic activities, and 
restricted physical education. 

2. The development of fundamental skills in those activities which 
will contribute to an intelligent use of leisure time. 

3. The provision of adequate opportunities for the development of 
qualities of leadership and cooperation through participation in the 
Intramural Program. 

4. The development of intelligent understanding of and a positive 
attitude toward personal health and hygiene in relation to daily living. 

All students enrolled in health and physical education are required 
to undergo physical examinations. Upon the basis of these examinations 
the College physician classifies each student for a physical education 
class in vigorous activity, semi-vigorous activity, or restricted physical 
education. During orientation week all freshmen are introduced to 
the facilities of the student health service by the College physician. 



Courses of Instruction 65 

HEALTH EDUCATION 
101,101s. PERSONAL HYGIENE Credit, One Hour either semester 
Two hours a week for one semester. Required of freshmen. 
A fundamental course in the principles and problems of personal 
hygiene. The course includes discussions based upon student health 
problems and interests, and instruction based upon health problems of 
college students. 

Ed. 385 H. Ed., Ed. 385S H. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS 

OF HEALTH EDUCATION FOR THE 

CLASSROOM TEACHER Credit, Two Hours 

Designed to furnish prospective elementary teachers with informa- 
tion and ideas to be of help in planning, carrying out and evaluating 
classroom health instruction. 

Ed. 386 H. Ed. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF 1 

HEALTH EDUCATION FOR THE 

SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

See page 58. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Students enrolled in activity courses in physical education are re- 
quired to have regulation gymnasium costumes for class. All freshmen 
and transfer students must purchase their uniforms during the first 
week of school from the Meredith Supply Store. 

First semester freshmen are limited to dance, team sports or equita- 
tion. Each semester thereafter students may choose from the variety 
of activities offered. 

111,111s. TEAM SPORTS: Beginning and Advanced Courses. 
Two hours a week for each semester. 
Basketball Softball 

Hockey Speedball 

Volleyball 

221,221s. RHYTHMIC ACTIVITIES: Beginning, Intermediate, and 
Advance Courses. 

Two hours a week for each semester. 
Modern Dance Folk and Square Dance 

223, 223S. RESTRICTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Two hours a week for each semester. 
Student classified for restricted physical education upon the recom- 
mendation of the College physician are enrolled in these courses. Each 
course is adapted to the needs of the individual student. In cases where 
student choices can be allowed, final selection will follow a conference 
with the head of the department. These activities are also open to stu- 
dents who are not on a restricted program. 
Archery Recreational Sports Slimnastics 



66 Meredith College 

251,2513 INDIVIDUAL SPORTS: Beginning, Intermediate, and Ad- 
vanced Courses. 
Two hours a week for each semester. 

Archery Life Saving 

Badminton Water Safety Instructor's Course 

Bowlingi Roller Skating 

Equitationi Swedish Gymnastics 

Golf! Tennis 

382. COMMUNITY RECREATION AND CAMP 

LEADERSHIP Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the concept and theory of recreation and camping; 
present-day trends in the light of their historical backgrounds; the 
organization of recreation centers, public and private camps; principles 
and methods of planning, conducting, and evaluating these two pro- 
grams. 

383,384. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION FOR THE SECONDARY 

SCHOOL Credit, Six Hours 

A survey of the history and principles of physical education as re- 
lated to a good program of physical education for the secondary school. 
A study of the activities as they relate to the needs of this age group, 
with experience in lesson planning and assisting with college classes. 

Ed. 386F P. Ed., Ed. 386 P. Ed. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE 
CLASSROOM TEACHER Credit, Two Hours 

Designed to help prospective elementary teachers to see and under- 
stand the place of physical education in the total educational system. 
Opportunities given for lesson planning and teaching the different types 
of activities for the various grade levels in elementary school. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Sarah McCulloh Lemmon, Professor 
Frank L. Grubbs, Jr., Assistant Projessor 
Thomas C. Parramore, Assistant Projessor 

Carolyn Barrington, Instructor 

Carolyn M. Happer, Instructor 

Requirements for a major: thirty semester hours in history includ- 
ing 101-102; 251, 252; 330; 480; and 491-492. It is recommended that 
students having a related field in history take either 330 or 480. 

History 400 is given in the fall of odd-numbered years. 

Ed. 386 S. St. coiints as Education. 

HISTORY 

101-102. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF MODERN 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Six Hours 

First semester: from prehistory to the French Revolution; second 
semester, from the French Revolution to the present. Introducing cul- 
tural and economic topics as well as historical. Staff 
Prerequisite to all other courses in history. 
' Special Fee. Paid at the time of registration for the class. 



Courses of Instruction 67 

251. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

TO 1865 Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Grubbs, Miss Lemmon 

252. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

SINCE 1865 Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Grubbs, Miss Lemmon 

[270. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH Credit, Three Hours] 

From colonial times to the present. 

301. ANCIENT HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From prehistoric times to the fall of Rome. Miss Harrington 

302. MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the fall of Rome to the opening of the 16th century. 

Miss Harrington 

330. DIRECTED READING AND RESEARCH IN 

EUROPEAN OR FAR EASTERN 

HISTORY Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: History 251, 252. Offered each semester. 
Required of all majors. Others admitted by special permis- 
sion. Broad reading on a selected topic culminating in a 
research paper on some phase of the topic. Staff 

340. HISTORY OF ENGLAND SINCE 1560 Credit, Three Hours 

Social, economic, and political studies. Mr. Parramore 

341. EARLY MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the Commercial Revolution to the Congress of Vienna. 

Mr. Parramore 

342. MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. 

Mr. Parramore 

343. RECENT EUROPEAN HISTORY Credit, Three Hours 

From the outbreak of World War I to the present. 

Mr. Parramore 
348F. FAR EASTERN POLITICS AND 

CIVILIZATION Credit, Two Hours 

Emphasis will be placed on India. Miss Harrington 

351. HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN COLONIES Credit, Three Hours 
Prerequisite: History 251. 

American colonial hi.slory from its European background to 
the Treaty of Paris, 1783. Mr. Grubbs 

360. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Hi.story 251, 252. 

An economic interpretation of American history from co- 
lonial times to the present. Special emphasis will be placed 
on mercantilism; American laissez-faire; and the Welfare 
State. Mr. Grubbs 



68 Meredith College 

Ed. 386 S. St. THE TEACHING OF HISTORY AND 

SOCIAL STUDIES Credit, Three Hours 

Miss Harrington 
390. HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN 

POLICY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 251, 252. Miss Lemmon 

400F. SUPERVISED TRAINING IN ARCHIVES Credit, Three Hours 
Open to juniors and seniors taking a major in history. Pro- 
fessional training in Archival Science, Museum Art, or Pub- 
lications under the joint supervision of the North Carolina 
Department of Archives and History and the Meredith Col- 
lege Department of History. Practicum required. 

444. CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL 

AFFAIRS Credit, One Hour 

Prerequisite: History 343 or 12 hours in history. 

Miss Harrington 

451. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES SINCE 1860 Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 252. Miss Lemmon 

452. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES BEFORE 1860 Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: History 251. Miss Lemmon 

480. DIRECTED READING AND RESEARCH 

IN AMERICAN HISTORY Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Nine hours of American history. Offered each 
semester. 

Required of all majors. Others admitted by special permission. 
Broad reading on a selected topic culminating in a researcli 
paper for which primary sources have been consulted. Staff 

491-492. THE LITERATURE OF HISTORY Credit, One Horn- 

Prerequisite: 18 hours of history. 

Required of all majors. Meets bi-weekly both semesters. A 
consideration of historiography and philosophies of history, 
both European and American. Staff 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

201. GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Grubbs 

202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN 

THE UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Mr. Grubbs 
301. POLITICAL PARTIES IN THE 

UNITED STATES Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Political Science 201 and History 252. 

Miss Lemmon 



Courses of Instruction 69 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Ellen Dozier Brewer, Professor 
Jennie M. Hanyen, Associate Professor 

Requirements for a major: Twenty-four semester hours of work in 
home economics above the freshman level. Students are advised to take 
Chemistry 101-102 in the freshman year. 

Ed. 386 H. E. counts as Education. 

101. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 

A study of clothing selection and appreciation. Elementary clothing 

construction. An analysis of fabrics to find the relation between cost 

and quality. Miss Hanyen 

104. FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 
Food selection and preparation. Miss Brewer 

223. FOODS AND COOKERY Credit, Three Hours 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 104, except by permission of 

the head of the department. 
A study of the principles and processes in the preparation and 
prei;crvation of food, and a consideration of the time and money values 
involved. Miss Brewer 

224. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 101. One lecture and five 
hours of laboratory. 
Advanced clothing construction. Continuation of fabric analysis. 

Miss Hanyen 

351. NUTRITION Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 223. and Chemistry 101-102. 
Two lectures and two hours of laboratory. Miss Brewer 

352. ADVANCED FOODS Credit. Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 223. Two lectures and four 

hours of laboratory. 

A course designed to apply the principles of nutrition and cookery to 

the plannin<?, preparation, and service of meals of various types and 

costs, with special emphasis on consumer buying practices and their 

relation to the food budget. Miss Brewer 

353. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 224. One lecture and five 
hours of laboratory. 
Tailoring. Use of foundation pattern in designing. Identification and 
practical testing of materials. Miss Hanyen 

354 TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit. Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 353. One lecture and five 
hours of laboratory. 
Alternates with 358. 
Applied costume designing. Problems draped on the dress form. 

Miss Hanyen 



70 Meredith College 

356. CHILD DEVELOPMENT Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the physical care and the development of the child from 

the pre-natal period through infancy. Miss Hanyen 

[358. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING Credit, Three Hours] 

Elective for juniors and seniors not majoring in home eco- 
nomics. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory. 
A survey of personal clothing problems to include the basic prin- 
ciples of selection, construction, and renovation of garments; the use 
of commercial patterns, and a knowledge of textiles from the stand- 
point of the consumer. 

Alternates with 354. Miss Hanyen 

359, 359S. FOOD SELECTION AND 

PREPARATION Credit, Three Hours 

Elective for juniors and seniors in all courses. Two lectures 

and four hours of laboratory. 

A brief course in food selection, preparation and service, planned 

for students majoring in other fields. Miss Brewer 

[362. DIET THERAPY Credit, Three Hours] 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 351 and Chemistry 221. Two 
lectures and two hours of laboratory. 
A continuation of Home Economics 351 with emphasis on special 

dietary problems. Miss Brewer 

[364. HOUSE PLANNING AND FURNISHING Credit, Three Hours] 
A study of the house plan from the standpoint of convenience and 
artistic effect. The selection of household furnishings and arrangements 
of interiors with special emphasis on economic factors. 

Alternates with Art 362. Miss Harmon 

Ed. 386 H. Ec. METHODS OF TEACHING HOME 

ECONOMICS Credit, Three Hours 

See page 58. 

389. HOME MANAGEMENT Credit, Three Hours 

The application of scientific principles to the problems of the modern 

homemaker; an evaluation of home equipment, its choice, care, and 

use. Miss Brewer 

491 ECONOMICS OF THE HOME Credit, One Horn- 

Open to seniors taking a major in home economics and to juniors by 
permission. Prerequisite or parallel: Home Economics 389. 

Miss Hanyen 
493 or 493S. ECONOMICS OF THE HOME- 
RESIDENCE Credit, Two Hours 
To be taken in connection with Home Economics 491. 
Residence for students in groups in the home management house. 

Miss Hanyen 



Courses of Instruction 71 

MATHEMATICS 

Ernest F. Canaday, Professor 

Dorothy K. Preston, Instructor 

Geneva L. Martin, Instructor 

Requirements for a major: Twenty-one semester hours above 101 
and 102. Ed. 385 M. counts as education. 

Topics recommended for teachers by the State Board of Education 
are incorporated into courses 101 and 102. 

101, lOlS. COLLEGE ALGEBRA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: two units in algebra. Staff 

102. TRIGONOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: two units in algebra and one in plane geometry. 

Staff 

221. PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 101 and 102. A few freshmen having three units 
in algebra and a course in trigonometry and scoring over 
550 on the College Board Mathematics test and making a 
good score on the test given at Meredith at the beginning of 
the year may be admitted without 101, 102. 

Mr. Canaday and Mrs. Preston 

222. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY OF SPACE Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 221. Mrs. Preston 

232. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 221. Mr. Canaday, Mrs. Preston 

351. INTEGRAL CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 232. Mr. Canaday, Mrs. Preston 

352. ADVANCED CALCULUS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 351. Mr. Canaday 

353. THEORY OF EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 221. Mr. Canaday 

356. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 232 and parallel with course 351. 

Mr. Canaday 

365. MODERN ALGEBRA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 101. Mrs. Preston 

366. LINEAR ALGEBRA Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 305. 

457. MODERN COLLEGE GEOMETRY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: 101 and 102. Mr. Canaday 

Ed. 385 M. METHODS OF TEACHING SECONDARY 

MATHEMATICS Credit, Three Hours 

Mrs. Preston 



72 Meredith College 

MUSIC 

Harry E. Cooper, Professor 

Stuart Pratt, Professor 

Beatrice Donley, Associate Professor 

Edwin K. Blanchard, Assistant Professor 

Phyllis Weyer Garriss, Assistant Professor 

James L. Clyburn, Assistant Professor 

Isabelle Haeseler, Instructor 

Stephen E. Young, Instructor 

The courses in the Department of Music fall into several principal 
groups, namely: courses in history and appreciation designed primarily 
as cultural courses for students not specializing in music; courses in 
teaching methods designed to prepare for work as a teacher of music 
(in the public schools or as a private teacher); courses in theory and 
composition designed to furnish a solid background for the under- 
standing and interpretation of the greatest music as well as to develop 
to the fullest the creative ability of the individual; courses in singing 
and playing leading to artistic performance; and courses leading to a 
major in church music. 

Students who wish to major in any branch of music must demon- 
strate to the satisfaction of the head of the department that their talent 
and previous training are such that they are qualified to carry on the 
work in a satisfactory manner. 

Students who cannot meet all the entrance requirements of the col- 
lege and the department may take work in applied music, but will not 
receive credit for such work. 

For Music majors applied music must be validated by equal credit 
(with C or better) in courses selected from the following: Theory, His- 
tory and Literature, Music Education and Ensemble, subject to quantita- 
tive restrictions stated elsewhere in the catalogue. 

MUSIC MAJORS MUST COMPLETE AT LEAST SIXTY 
SEMESTER HOURS IN NON-MUSIC SUBJECTS 

Major in Applied Music (piano, organ, violin, or voice) for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts: 

Applied music major 24 hours 

Electives in applied music and ensemble 6 horn's 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Electives in Theory, History and Literature, Music 

Education, and Ensemble 6 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Major in Music Education for the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Methods 385, 386i 6 hours 



• Six hours toward the certificate requirements (see p. 52). 



Courses of Instruction 73 

Wind Instruments 365, 366 2 hours 

String Instruments 367, 368 2 hours 

Orchestration 494 2 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Piano and voicei 

Major in Church Music for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts: 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

History of Music 363, 364 6 hours 

Church Music 387, 388 6 hours 

Field work in Church Music 493 3 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Chorus 2 hours 

Applied Music 24 hours 

Minimum of 6 hours each in piano, organ, and voice 
( 12 hours in one of these) 

Religion 247 or 369 3 hours 

Religion 351 or 356 3 hours 

Majors in church music, organ, public school music, violin, and 
voice must complete Piano 101 with a satisfactory grade. 

Majors in public school music and church music are expected to ap- 
pear in one public recital above the level of the student recital. 

Majors in organ should elect: Counterpoint, four semester hours 
(junior year); and Canon and Fugue, two semester hours (senior 
year ) . 

A senior recital and a partial junior recital is required of all majors 
in applied music. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 

OF MUSIC 

Students who hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science will be granted the degree of Bachelor of Music on meeting the 
following requirements: 

1. Present a total of 45 hours in applied music, at least 36 hours of 
which must be in one major field of applied music, and give a recital 
which, in the opinion of the faculty, is worthy of the degree. 

2. Complete all theory courses in the following list which have not 
already been completed: 

Theory 101, 102 6 hours 

Theory 221, 222 6 hours 

Music History 363, 364 6 hours 

Form and Analysis 353, 354 4 hours 

Counterpoint 351, 352 4 hours 

Canon and Fugue 498 2 hours 

Composition 491 3 hours 

Development of Symphony 401 2 hours 

Orchestration 494 2 hours 

Conducting 497 2 hours 

Survey of Chamber Music 402 2 hours 

> Piano and voice must be studied until, In the opinion of the faculty, a reasonable 
proflciency has been reached. 



74 Meredith College 

Students may elect additional courses in any department if time 
permits, but will not be required to carry more hours than necessary 
to meet these minimum requirements. 

EQUIPMENT 

Eight grand pianos, twenty-one upright pianos, a three-manual organ, 
two two-manual organs and numerous orchestral instruments furnish 
thorough equipment for effective teaching. 

STUDENT RECITALS 

Student recitals are held bi-weekly, at which all music students are 
required to be present, and in which they are required to take part 
when requested to do so by their teachers. 

Freshmen and sophomores majoring in piano, organ, voice, or violin 
will appear in recital at least once each semester, except that freshmen 
may be excused the first semester. Juniors will be heard at least twice 
each semester, and seniors at the discretion of their major professors. 

CONCERTS 

The College appropriates funds to provide opportunities for the stu- 
dents to hear good music. The Raleigh Concert Music Association 
brings a number of orchestras and artists to Raleigh each season. Con- 
certs given by the Raleigh Oratorio Society, the Cliamber Music Guild 
and other local organizations are also open to students. Members of 
the faculty of the Department of Music are active as recitalists, and 
the faculty concerts given throughout the year include works from 
all schools of composition. 

THEORY 
101, 102. THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

Each Semester 

Prerequisite: Theory 101 before 102. Required of freshmen 

majoring in music. 
Elementary introduction to the theory of music with emphasis upon 
the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of music and the de- 
velopment of musicianship. Miss Haeseler 

221, 222. THEORY Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 102 before 221 and Each Semester 

221 before 222. 

Required of sophomores majoring in music. 
A continuation of Theory 101, 102. Review of harmonic practice 
followed by a study of modulations, seventh chords, chromatic altera- 
tions as exemplified in the works of the major baroque, classic and 
romantic composers. Mr. Young 

233. MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS Credit, Three Hours 

The student will study pitch, scales, keys, and key signatures, rhythm 
and time signatures, rhythmic reading and elementary chords and their 
functions. There will be included melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dic- 
tation, and basic keyboard harmony. Not open to students who have 
completed Theory 101, 102. 
[BLOCK COURSE] Mr. Blanchard 



Courses of Instruction 75 

351,352. COUNTERPOINT Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 222 before 351 and Each Semester 

351 before 352. 

Required of juniors majoring in organ. 
Strict counterpoint in all five species and a study of the medieval 

modes. Mr. Young 

353, 354. FORM AND ANALYSIS Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 222 before 353 and Each Semester 

353 before 354. 

Required of juniors majoring in music. 
An explanation of design and structure in all types of homophonic 
music. The phrase, period, song-forms carried through to the sonata. 

Mr. Cooper 

491. COMPOSITION Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisites: Counterpoint 352, Form and Analysis 354. 
Composition in various forms for voice, chorus, individual instru- 
ments, and combinations of instruments, followed largely by the in- 
clination of the student. Mrs. Garriss 

494. ORCHESTRATION Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisites: Theory 222, Counterpoint 352. 
A study of the instruments of the orchestra. Arranging music for 
various groups of instruments and for full orchestras. Mrs. Garriss 

498. CANON AND FUGUE Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Counterpoint 352. 

Required of seniors majoring in organ. 
A course touching upon all the complex devices of involved poly- 
phonic music. Double, triple, and quadruple counterpoint. Mr. Cooper 



HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

226. APPRECIATION OF MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

A course adapted to the needs of the general college student who 
wishes to obtain an understanding of music as an element of liberal 
culture and to develop the power of listening intelligently. No technical 
knowledge required. Not open to music majors. Mrs. Garriss 

Mr. Blanchard 

363, 364. THE HISTORY OF MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

Each Semester 
Prerequisites: English 102, History 102, and Music Theory 
102. 

Required of students majoring in music. 
The development of musical art from ancient times to the present. 
The study of music as literature, through the analysis of masterworks. 

Mr. Young 

387,388. CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

Each Semester 
Prerequisite: Theory 101, 102. 
A course dealing with all phases of music in the Protestant church. 
Organization and administration of adult and children's choirs, with 



76 Meredith College 

extensive survey of anthems and other materials. Study of hymns and 
their use, and consideration of the ministry of music as an aid to 
worship. Mr. Young 

401. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYMPHONY Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Music History 364 or Music Appreciation 226. 
The history of the symphony with a detailed study of several works 
and sufficient hearing of about a dozen outstanding works so that the 
student becomes familiar with them. The styles of different composers 
and the development of orchestration emphasized. The writing of a 
research paper of small thesis proportions based primarily on the 
study of scores and recordings used in the course. Mrs. Garriss 

402. SURVEY OF CHAMBER MUSIC 

LITERATURE Credit, Two Hours 

Prerequisite: Music History 364 or Music Appreciation 226. 
The history of chamber music emphasizing the forms and styles of 
various periods and composers. Student-faculty performances of cham- 
ber works whenever possible. Score-study and recordings of about 
fifteen outstanding chamber works so that the student becomes very 
familiar with them. Mrs. Garriss 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Ed. 286 Mus. GRADED MATERIALS AND 

METHODS Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Music 233 or permission of the department. 
This course is recommended for all prospective teachers at the ele- 
mentary level, especially those preparing to teach in North Carolina. 
Designed to lead the primary education teacher toward an understand- 
ing of the presentation of singing, rhythmic, instrumental, listening, 
and creative activities to the child in grades one through six, the course 
is presented through a sequence of related activities. Not open to stu- 
dents who have completed Ed. 385 Mus. 
[BLOCK COURSE] Miss Haeseler 

357. THE TEACHING OF THE PIANO Credit, Three Hours 

Methods of teaching children notation, piano technique, elements of 
theory, rliythm, and ear training, with a systematic study of material 
suitable for beginners of all ages, as well as more advanced students. 
A survey of piano literature. Mr. Clyburn 

361. THE TEACHING OF STRING 

INSTRUMENTS Credit, Three Hours 

A short resume of the history of string instruments, their construc- 
tion and literature. Methods of teaching children notation, elements 
of theory, ear-training, left-hand technique, bowing technique; good 
tone production; systematic study of material for pupils of all grades 
of advancement. Mrs. Garriss 

365, 366. WIND AND PERCUSSION 

INSTRUMENTS Credit, One Hour 

Each Semester 
Required of majors in public school music. 
A practical study of the technique of two brass instruments, one 
woodwind, and one percussion instrument. Mrs. Garriss 



Courses of Instruction 77 

367, 368. STRING INSTRUMENTS Credit, One Hour 

Each Semester 
Required of majors in public school music. 

A practical study of string instruments with emphasis on violin. 

Mrs. Garriss 

Ed. 385 Mus. MATERIALS AND METHODS FOR 
TEACHING VOCAL MUSIC IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 102. Required of juniors majoring in 

public school music. 

Survey of the materials and methods for the presentation of singing, 

rhythmic, instrumental, creative, and listening activities to the child 

in grades one through six. Miss Haeseler 

Ed. 386 Mus. MATERIALS AND METHODS FOR 
TEACHING VOCAL MUSIC IN THE 

SECONDARY SCHOOL Credit, Three Hours 

Prerequisite: Theory 102. Required of juniors majoring in 

public school music. 

A study of the various singing texts available for use in the junior 

and senior high school. Miss Haeseler 

493. FIELD WORK IN CHURCH MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

495a. OBSERVATION AND DIRECTED TEACHING 

IN APPLIED MUSIC Credit, Three Hours 

The work to be done in connection with Theory 357 or 361, under 
the direction of the professor giving such course. In some cases a 
limited amount of this credit allowed toward the requirement in di- 
rected teaching for the certificate. 

Prerequisites: Education and Music 357. Mr. Clyburn 

497. CONDUCTING Credit, Two Hours 

Required of students majoring in public school music and 
church music. 

Class meets three times weekly. 
Essentials in conducting, baton technique. Practical experience in 

conducting in the college chorus. Mr. Blanchard 



ENSEMBLE 

369, 370. ENSEMBLE PLAYING Credit, Two Hours 

Each Semester 

A study of the standard ensemble literature; open to all qualified 

students by arrangement with members of the faculty. Staff 

CHORUS Credit, One Hour 

Each Semester 

Two semesters required for all students majoring in music. Non- 
majors admitted on basis of auditions held at beginning of each se- 
mester. The Chorus as a whole, and groups selected from it, provide 
music for various college functions and give concerts on and off the 
campus. Attendance at three one-hour rehearsals each week and at all 
performances required. Miss Donley 



78 Meredith College 

ORCHESTRA Credit, One-half Hour 

Each Semester 

An opportunity given to students to play in an orchestra, to hear 
their own arrangements performed, and to gain experience in conduct- 
ing. Mrs. Garriss 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Students in the music department who wish to take part in public 
programs should consult with their respective teachers and the head 
of the Department of Music in advance. 

All courses in applied music require three hours practice per week 
for each semester hour credit; for every three semester hours credit, or 
fraction thereof, a student must take not less than one lesson a week, 
of at least a half-hour duration, throughout the semester. No student 
is permitted to take more than eight semester hours of applied music 
in any one semester. The work in applied music is adjusted to suit the 
needs of each individual student, but in general follows the outline of 
the following courses: 

PIANO 

Mr. Pratt, Mr. Clyburn, Miss Haeseler 

The materials used for technical development are variable, depend- 
ing on the concepts of the teacher, and the individual needs of the 
pupil. A thorough knowledge of all scales and arpeggios should be 
established before a pupil enters Piano 101. 

100. PIANO BELOW THE LEVEL OF FRESHMAN PIANO 

A maximum of six semester hours of this work for credit permitted. 
To be validated by courses selected from Theory, History and Litera- 
ture, Music Education and Ensemble. 

101, 102. FRESHMAN PIANO 

Bach Inventions, Preludes, Suites; Sonatas of the difficulty of the 
Haydn in D major, Mozart F major (K. 332), and Beethoven Op. 14, 
No. 2; the easier Chopin Preludes, Valses, Mazurkas, Nocturnes; other 
classical, romantic, and contemporary composers. 

221,222. SOPHOMORE PIANO 

Bach Three-Part Inventions, Well-Tempered Clavier, Suites, Parti- 
tas; Mozart and Beethoven Sonatas; Chopin works of moderate diffi- 
culty; other classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary 
composers. 

351,352. JUNIOR PIANO 

Bach Well-Tempered Clavier, Toccatas, Partitas, etc.; Mozart and 
Beethoven Sonatas; Chopin Etudes, Impromptus, Scherzi; Ballades; 
etc.; other classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary com- 
posers. 

491,492. SENIOR PIANO 

Bach Well-Tempered Clavier, Chorale-Preludes, and larger works; 
Beethoven Sonatas of greater difficulty; Concerti; Schumann, Chopin, 
Liszt, Debussy, and Ravel works suitable for senior recital; other 
classical, romantic, impressionistic, and contemporary composers. 



Courses of Instruction 79 

ORGAN 

Mr. Cooper, Miss Haeseler, Mr. Young 

101, 102. FRESHMAN ORGAN 

Manual and pedal technique; Bach Eight Short Preludes and Fugues; 
short pieces involving the fundamentals of registration and use of the 
expression pedals; hymn playing. Students beginning organ usually 
take half their work in organ and half in piano. 

221, 222. SOPHOMORE ORGAN 

Bach Preludes and Fugues of the first master period. Choral Preludes; 
sonatas by Guilmant, Mendelssohn; simpler works of the modern 
schools; accompanying. 

351,352. JUNIOR ORGAN 

Bach, smaller works of the mature master period, selected move- 
ments from the Trio Sonatas and Concertos; sonatas by Guilmant, 
Mendelssohn, Rheinberger, and others; pieces by classic and modern 
composers; service playing. 

491,492. SENIOR ORGAN 

Bach, larger works of the mature master period; compositions of 
Franck; symphonies of Widor, Vierne; compositions of the modern 
French, English, German, and American Schools. 



VIOLIN 

Mrs. Garriss 
101, 102. FRESHMAN VIOLIN 

Thorough study of bowing and left-hand technique; Laoureux Etudes, 
Bk. II; Mazas Op. 36; concertos by Dc Beriot and Accolay; sonatinas 
by Schubert. 

221,222. SOPHOMORE VIOLIN 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves; Mazas Etudes Speciales, 
Kreutzer Etudes: sonatas of Corelli and Handel; concertos by Rode, 
Viotti, and Kreutzer. 

351,352. JUNIOR VIOLIN 

Technical work continued; etudes by Kreutzer and Fiorillo; sonatas 
by Mozart and Beethoven; concertos by Viotti, Kreutzer, and Mozart. 

491,492. SENIOR VIOLIN 

Scales in thirds and octaves; etudes by Rode and Gavinies; concertos 
by Vieuxtemps, Wieniawski, Godard, and others; sonatas by Bach, 
Tartini, and Beethoven. 



ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS 

Courses in viola, flute, and other orchestral instruments will in 
some cases be offered on request, when qualified instruction is avail- 
able by members of the departmental faculty. Credit will be given on 
the same basis as with other applied music. 



80 Meredith College 

VOICE 

Miss Donley, Mr. Blanchard 
101, 102. FRESHMAN VOICE 

Position and poise of the body, strengthening exercises for the vocal 
mechanism, supplemented by technical exercises with musical figures 
for the development of vocal freedom. Simpler songs from classical 
literature. English and Italian pronunciation. 

221,222. SOPHOMORE VOICE 

Technical work of the freshman year continued; scales and staccato 
exercises. Moderately difficult songs by composers of romantic, and 
contemporary literature. French and German pronunciation. 

351, 352. JUNIOR VOICE 

More advanced technique and vocalizations. Advanced literature. 
Introduction of oratorio and operatic repertoire. 

491,492. SENIOR VOICE 

Technical work continued, stressing flexibility. Total repertory should 
include four arias from operatic literature; four arias from oratorio 
literature; twenty songs from the classic and romantic literature; twenty 
songs from modern literature. 

PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

Ethel Tilley, Projessor 

Requirements for a major: Twenty-four hours in the department 
with at least eighteen hours in Psychology. 

PSYCHOLOGY 
Psychology 221 is a prerequisite for all other courses in Psychology. 

221. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 
An introduction to the methods of science and to psychology as a 

science of human behavior: heredity, environment; sensation, percep- 
tion; emotions, motives, adjustments to conflicts and frustrations; intel- 
ligence, learning, remembering and forgetting, thinking; observing and 
reporting; individual aptitudes. 

222. GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL 

PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

An introduction to the chief methods of laboratory psychology. In- 
dividual and group experiments in reflexes, animal and human learn- 
ing, remembering, emotions, sensation, perception, imagery, illusions, 
fatigue, observing and reporting, and development of individual and 
group attitudes. Two class hours and one three-hour laboratory period 
weekly. 

232. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT Credit, Three Hours 

(1) Personal adjustment of normal people; (2) mental health. Offered 
in alternate years. 

351. PSYCHOLOGY OF ABNORMAL 

BEHAVIOR Credit, Three Hours 

(1) A brief history of the treatment of the mentally ill; (2) mild 

mental disorders and slight maladjustments to social living; (3) syn- 

drones of psychoses as they are classified today; (4) modern methods 

in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. 



Courses of Instruction 81 

[355. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours] 

(1) Communication among human beings; (2) differences and like- 
nesses in social groups; (3) the individual as a member of groups; (4) 
meeting problems of social living, such as competition for material 
goods, war, prejudice, and changing customs in marriage and family 
life. Offered in alternate years. 

357. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY Credit, Three Hours 

A study of the practical applications of psychology in personal de- 
velopment and social relations; in business, industry, and professions; 
in clinics. Each student will add to her general study an individual 
investigation in a field of her interest. Offered in alternate years. 

[358. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY Credit, Three Hours] 

(1) The development and functioning of normal personality; (2) 
theories of defining, assessing, and interpreting personality. Offered in 
alternate years. 

408. DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY AND 

FIELDS OF PSYCHOLOGY Credit, One to Three Hours 
Offered on demand. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 223 or 224 is a prerequisite for all other courses in Phi- 
losophy, except by special permission. 

223. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Credit, Three Hours 
A student-developed course. The method differs from year to yea